Heart Matters

Heart Matters

Episodes

  • Heart Disease in Ancient Egyptians

    Jul 21, 2014 | 14 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Randall Thompson It's widely believed that modern behaviors of inactivity, stress and poor diet are primary causes of the development of cardiovascular disease, but history may suggest otherwise. What is new evidence from ancient Egyptian mummies teaching us about heart disease? Dr. Randy Thompson, cardiologist at St. Luke's Hospital Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Missouri, shares the exciting findings of his research team in Cairo that found calcification using CT scans to study ancient Egyptian mummies. How likely is it that these mummies died from cardiovascular causes? What do these findings suggest about the etiology of heart disease? Tune in ...
  • Future Cardiovascular Disease & the Big Impact of Small Salt Reductions

    Jul 14, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guests: Glenn Chertow, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo We are well aware that the overabundance of processed, frozen and fast foods contribute to many Americans exceeding the recommended daily allowance of sodium. But there are potentially enormous cardiovascular benefits to cutting down on salt intake by even a very modest amount. How can we quantify the actual clinical impact of salt reduction? Dr. Kirstin Bibbins-Domingo, associate professor of medicine and of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California San Francisco, and Dr. Glenn Chertow, professor of medicine and chief of the division of nephrology at Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford...
  • Glucose Control After Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Jul 7, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Mikhail Kosiborod Elevated blood sugar levels are quite common among even non-diabetic patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (or AMI). Does lowering a patient's glucose level actually improve outcomes, and if so, what glucose-control therapies are most effective for these patients? Dr. Mikhail Kosiborod, associate professor of medicine at the University of Missouri-Kansas City and cardiologist at St. Luke's Hospital Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Missouri, reviews recent findings about glucose control and AMI with host Dr. Janet Wright.  
  • Cardiac Care on Ice: Therapeutic Hypothermia for Cardiac Arrest

    Jun 23, 2014 | 14 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Michael Mooney Therapeutic hypothermia is a relatively new treatment option for patients who suffer cardiac arrest, that can significantly improve neurologic outcomes. What factors determine the success of cooling therapy for cardiac arrest, and what resources does the procedure require? Dr. Michael Mooney, Director of Interventional Cardiology, Minneapolis Cardiology Associates, at Minneapolis Heart Institute / Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minnesota, explores the indications for therapeutic hypothermia with host Dr. Janet Wright. Might therapeutic hypothermia be approached with a strategy similar to initiatives aimed at reducing door-to-balloon time for ST-...
  • As Prescribed: Meeting the Challenges of Medication Adherence

    Jun 16, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Michael Ho Medication adherence is a significant problem in the US. Patients with chronic conditions such as hypertension or high cholesterol can be particularly susceptible to non-adherence, because patients may not experience symptoms that would seem to justify taking medication, and thus may not notice any immediate benefits from their medications. What are some of the other barriers to medication adherence? Dr. Michael Ho, associate professor in the department of medicine at the University of Colorado, Denver, has examined the prevalence of non-adherence, and says that good communication and patient education can go a long way toward encouraging patients to...
  • The Hypertension Paradox: Better Treatment, Worse Outcomes

    Jun 9, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Aram Chobanian In recent years, we have developed a sufficient understanding of the mechanisms behind hypertension that has led to the evolution of numerous diagnostic and treatment options. Yet the prevalence of hypertension persists. Why does hypertension continue to disable and kill millions throughout the world, and what can we do to reduce the incidence of this chronic condition? Dr. Aram Chobanian, president emeritus of Boston University, who served as dean of the BU School of Medicine and provost of the BU Medical Campus, discusses the hypertension paradox and suggests more effective strategies for managing the condition. Dr. Janet Wright hosts.
  • The Scientific Pursuit of More Precise Care

    Jun 2, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Geoffrey Ginsburg Patient-centered care is a hot topic in health care these days, though usually when we think of patient-centeredness, our thinking tilts toward aspects of policymaking or system delivery. Host Dr. Janet Wright takes a look at the science side of patient-centered care — the more precise tailoring of therapy known as personalized medicine — with Dr. Geoffrey Ginsburg, founding director of the Center for Genomic Medicine at the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy and professor of medicine and pathology at Duke University School of Medicine. Dr. Ginsburg also shares what he considers to be the top priorities of this field, forging a path...
  • The Clinically Broken Heart: Stress-Induced Cardiomyopathy

    May 26, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Scott Sharkey Takotsubo, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy (also known as 'broken heart syndrome'), was first recognized in Japan in the 1990s. Acute emotional or physical stress trigger the condition, which mimics the symptoms of a myocardial infarction (or MI). How can physicians differentiate between stress-induced cardiomyopathy and a more conventional MI, and how is stress-induced cardiomyopathy treated? What characteristics might make a patient more susceptible to developing this condition? Our guest is Dr. Scott Sharkey, senior consulting cardiologist at Minneapolis Heart Institute and director of the Takotsubo cardiomyopathy research program at the Minne...
  • Cardiac Care for a Young, At-Risk Population in Saudi Arabia

    May 26, 2014 | 16 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Mostafa Youssef This week on Heart Matters, we'll explore the terrain of cardiovascular care in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with one of the country's leading experts, Dr. Mostafa Youssef, founding director of the Prince Salman Heart Center at King Fahad Medical City in Riyadh. It is a country with vast cultural differences compared to the Western world, and yet we find physicians in Saudi Arabia treating many of the same cardiac conditions that we see in the United States. Host Dr. Janet Wright talks with Dr. Youssef about the challenges of treating a very young population with a high incidence of risk factors and distinctive pathologies, efforts parallel to th...
  • Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Diagnosis and Treatment

    May 19, 2014 | 1 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Theodore Abraham It is a condition that most commonly affects our young athletes, but many of the symptoms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) do not manifest until it is too late. How are we improving our techniques and strategies for preventing, identifying and addressing HCM before it leads to tragedy? Dr. Theodore Abraham, associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and associate director of the echocardiography laboratory at Johns Hopkins Hospital, joins host Dr. Janet Wright to talk over key issues in our understanding of HCM, including his advice for patients with phenotypically mild disease progression.
  • Cardiac Care for a Young, At-Risk Population in Saudi Arabia

    May 19, 2014 |
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Mostafa Youssef This week on Heart Matters, we'll explore the terrain of cardiovascular care in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with one of the country's leading experts, Dr. Mostafa Youssef, founding director of the Prince Salman Heart Center at King Fahad Medical City in Riyadh. It is a country with vast cultural differences compared to the Western world, and yet we find physicians in Saudi Arabia treating many of the same cardiac conditions that we see in the United States. Host Dr. Janet Wright talks with Dr. Youssef about the challenges of treating a very young population with a high incidence of risk factors and distinctive pathologies, efforts parallel to th...
  • Revising CPR to Improve Cardiac Arrest Outcomes Outside the Hospital

    May 12, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Peter Nagele Time is of the essence after cardiac arrest; action must be taken within five minutes. Survival rates for patients who arrest outside the hospital are disappointing. How do we help patients who arrest in public or (statistically more likely) in the home, where there is no access to medical equipment and medication? Host Dr. Janet Wright talks with Dr. Peter Nagele, chief of the section of trauma anesthesiology in the department of anesthesiology at Washington University in St. Louis, about revised CPR methods without mouth-to-mouth, and what recent research tells us about the potential for these methods to improve outcomes. And what are plans for t...
  • Identifying Unstable Coronary Plaques

    May 5, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Gary Mintz Acute coronary syndromes in patients who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention is the subject of the conversation between guest Dr. Gary Mintz, chief medical officer of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, an independent, academically focused nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the survival and quality of life for people with cardiovascular disease through research and education,  and host Dr. Janet Wright. How often do patients who have an acute coronary syndrome have a recurrent event? Their discussion includes protocols, paramaters and outcomes of the PROSPECT trial. The use of ultrasound as well as angiography are also di...
  • Simple Screening for Older Patients Considering Cardiac Surgery

    Apr 28, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Joseph Cleveland Cardiac surgery can improve quality of life, but it also poses risks for patients over the age of 65. Can a screening test as simple as walking speed predict the outcomes of cardiac surgery for our older patients? Dr. Janet Wright hosts this discussion.
  • Genetic Testing for Long QT Syndrome

    Apr 21, 2014 | 16 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Dan Roden Long QT syndrome can be a silent threat. Although not all patients with congenital long QT syndrome develop symptoms, there is potential for dangerous arrhythmia that can cause sudden cardiac death. Can and should genetic testing guide clinicians in diagnosing and treating this condition? Dr. Dan Roden, professor of medicine and pharmacology and assistant vice-chancellor for personalized medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, says the concept of personalized medicine goes beyond genetics; it is also about meeting a patient's goals and individual needs. How can genetic testing help physicians decide which medical therapy might be most ap...
  • The Obesity Epidemic in Mississippi: A Mirror for the Nation

    Apr 7, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Thad Waites Obesity is a nationwide epidemic, but this is nowhere more apparent than in Mississippi, which was ranked as the state with the highest obesity rate in 2009 by the Centers for Disease Control. How does the obesity issue in Mississippi mirror that of the rest of the nation, and what efforts are underway to address this public health problem? Dr. Thad Waites, director of the cardiac catheterization lab at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, and interventional cardiologist at the Hattiesburg Clinic, talks about how each player in the healthcare community can target the obesity epidemic. What initiatives and projects are demonstrating ...
  • Could Silkworms Help Repair Clogged Arteries?

    Mar 24, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: David Kaplan Although most bypass grafts are sourced from other parts of a patient's body, bioengineers are examining new materials that might be used for bypass grafts to reduce the risk of second-site complications. Silk has been a standard material in sutures for decades, and is now showing promise as a biomaterial in bypass grafts. Might silkworms help repair clogged arteries? Dr. David Kaplan, endowed chair, the Stern Family Professor of Engineering, and professor & chair of the department of biomedical engineering at Tufts University, discusses the advantages of silk protein as a biomaterial and related applications to cardiology. When might this new tech...
  • Genetic Clues to Heart Health

    Mar 17, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Christopher O'Donnell We know that genes play a role in cardiovascular health, but new research has identified specific DNA regions that are associated with risk factors for coronary heart disease. It's estimated that 30-50% of cardiovascular health is influenced by family history or genetics, while the rest is influenced by other environmental factors, diet and exercise. How might these new genetic discoveries lead to new treatment options? Dr. Christopher O'Donnell, associate director and scientific director of the SHARe Project of the Framingham Heart Study at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, and associate clinical professor of medicine at Harva...
  • The Complexity of Medication Management for Older Patients with Heart Failure

    Mar 3, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Michael Steinman One of the characteristics of our older patients with heart failure is that they often have other conditions and therefore take multiple medications. How can we reduce the risk of adverse drug events among patients with heart failure and other comorbidities? Dr. Michael Steinman, associate professor of medicine at the University of California-San Francisco and the San Francisco VA Medical Center discusses the challenge of managing medications for older patients with heart failure and offers his ideas on how to reduce drug interactions and encourage adherence. How can we better coordinate care between physicians to optimize care for patients wit...
  • Evaluation of Second Generation Drug-Eluting Stents

    Feb 24, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Janet Wright Guest: Richard Lange First generation drug-eluting stents offer many advantages over bare metal stents, the most significant of which is their efficacy in reducing the rate of restenosis. Now second generation drug-eluting stents are proving to be even more beneficial. How are these second generation drug-eluting stents further reducing the risk of late stent thrombosis, myocardial infarction and repeat revascularization? Dr. Richard Lange, professor and executive vice chairman of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center, in San Antonio, Texas, discusses the structural and molecular differences between first and second generation drug-eluting stents. ...

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