ReachMD Book Club

ReachMD Book Club

Episodes

  • The Diabetes Breakthrough: Dr. Osama Hamdy on his 12-week plan

    Sep 1, 2014 | 16 min
    Hosted by: Maurice Pickard Obesity and sedentary activities have contributed to an epidemic of diabetes mellitus in the US. Is there an answer that is not simply a "fad" diet? Joining host Dr. Maurice Pickard to address this important question is Dr. Osama Hamdy, Medical Director of the Weight Management Program at Joslin Diabetes Center and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Hamdy is co-author of Diabetes Breakthrough: Better Health in Just 12 Weeks.   
  • Strange Medicine: A Shocking History of Real Medical Practices Through the Ages

    Aug 18, 2014 | 17 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell Strange Medicine is an account of the practice of medicine throughout the ages that highlights the most bizarre treatments, medical blunders, and odd medical behavior that seem to do more harm than good. Author Nathan Belofsky joins host Dr. John Russell to discuss a variety of medical oddities across the timeline of history.
  • Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital, Part 2

    Aug 11, 2014 | 20 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell A New Orleans hospital, after Hurricane Katrina, was surrounded on all sides by several feet of water. The power was out, and as time went on without restoration of basic operations, rumors began circulating of the hospital being overrun by looters. It was a period of total chaos with breakdowns in institutional leadership, compromises in patient care, and in some cases, clinical decisions with deadly consequences. Dr. Sheri Fink, author of Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital, takes us on a tour of the aftermath of these events, and the public outcries that both villified and defended the healthcare workers involved. Click here for Par...
  • Knocking on Heaven's Door: The Path to a Better Way of Death

    Aug 4, 2014 | 16 min
    Hosted by: Maurice Pickard Host Dr. Maurice Pickard welcomes award-winning journalist Katy Butler. In her book, Knocking on Heaven's Door, she speaks for the twenty-four million Americans who are helping their parents through their final years. Ms. Butler's memoir and investigation reports on the modern complications of technology, medicine, and business toward the process of dying. Knocking on Heaven's Door helps encourage readers to have the difficult conversations with loved ones that are needed in order to discover paths toward a better way of death. Download and listen today!  
  • The Witch in the Waiting Room: A Physician Investigates Paranormal Phenomena in Medicine

    Jul 28, 2014 | 16 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell Have your patients shared with you paranormal experiences? Have there been unexplained medical mysteries resolved? Sharing case studies and analyses from respected medical journals, Dr. Robert Bobrow researches various instances that do not fit into the normal lexicon of medical diagnoses. He encourages health care providers to be aware of unexplainable phenomena in order to experience opportunities to advance science. Tune in to listen to host Dr. John Russell reviewing Dr. Bobrow's book, The Witch in the Waiting Room: A Physician Investigates Paranormal Phenomena in Medicine. Dr. Bobrow has practiced general medicine for over thirty years and is currently a clini...
  • The Remedy: Robert Koch, Arthur Conan Doyle, and the Quest to Cure Tuberculosis

    Jul 21, 2014 | 16 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell Host Dr. John Russell chats with author Thomas Goetz about his recent book, The Remedy: Robert Koch, Arthur Conan Doyle, and the Quest To Cure Tuberculosis. The book chronicles the lives of two men: Robert Koch, great German scientist, who convinced the world of the germ theory of disease; and Arthur Conan Doyle, trained physician and author of Sherlock Holmes stories. The Remedy traces the history of tuberculosis, the people who brought its diagnosis, etiology, and treatment approaches to light, and ways in which scientific discoveries evolved into everyday realities. Mr. Goetz is a writer, entrepreneur and health care innovator.  
  • The Panic Virus: The True Story Behind the Vaccine-Autism Controversy

    Jul 14, 2014 | 17 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell In 1998 Andrew Wakefield, a British gastroenterologist with a history of self-promotion, published a paper with a shocking allegation: the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine might cause autism. The media seized hold of the story and, in the process, helped to launch one of the most devastating health scares ever. Yet despite the numerous studies that failed to find any link between childhood vaccines and autism, it has since been popularized by media personalities, and declining vaccination rates have led to outbreaks of deadly illnesses like Hib, measles, and whooping cough. In The Panic Virus: The True Story Behind the Vaccine-Autism Controversy, author Seth Mnookin d...
  • Born To Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen

    Jul 7, 2014 | 16 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell Author Christopher McDougall's book, Born To Run, is an epic adventure that began with one simple question: Why does my foot hurt? Isolated by Mexico's deadly Copper Canyons, the blissful Tarahumara Indians have honed the ability to run hundreds of miles without rest or injury. Mr. McDougall set out to discover their secrets. In the process, he has journied from science labs at Harvard to the sun-baked valleys and freezing peaks across North America, where ever-growing numbers of ultra-runners are pushing their bodies to the limit, and, finally, to a climactic race in the Copper Canyons that pits America's best ultra-runners against the tribe.
  • The Wild Life of Our Bodies: Predators, Parasites, and Partners That Shape Who We Are Today

    Jun 30, 2014 | 16 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell In his book, The Wildlife of Our Bodies, biologist Rob Dunn from the Department of Biology at North Carolina State University opines that while "clean living" has benefited us in some ways, it has also made us sicker in others. We are trapped in bodies that evolved to deal with the dependable presence of hundreds of other species. As Dunn reveals, our modern disconnect from the web of life has resulted in unprecedented effects that immunologists, evolutionary biologists, psychologists, and other scientists are only beginning to understand.
  • Ha! The Science of When We Laugh and Why

    Jun 9, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Maurice Pickard Ha! The Science of When We Laugh and Why wirtten by Scott Weems, PhD examines the internal process of how the brain and the mind operate in interpreting humor. Dr. Weems will also review humor as an exercise for the brain, the psychological and intellectual benefits of humor and what happens physiologically. Dr. Weems' career began as an officer in the U.S. Coast Guard, where he served as communications officer in Kodiak, Alaska. His travels then took him to New Orleans, Boston, Los Angeles, Annapolis, and Little Rock, where he earned graduate degrees in psychology, education, creative writing, and a Ph.D. in cognitive neuroscience from UCLA along the way. Download...
  • Rabid: A Cultural History of the World's Most Diabolical Virus

    Jun 2, 2014 | 20 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell A maddened creature, frothing at the mouth, lunges at an innocent victim and, with a bite, transforms its prey into another raving monster. It's a scenario that underlies our darkest tales of supernatural horror, but its power derives from a very real virus, a deadly scourge known to mankind from our earliest days. In this fascinating exploration, journalist Bill Wasik and veterinarian Monica Murphy speak with host Dr. John Russell about the history, science, and cultural mythology of rabies as described in their book "Rabid."
  • On the Art of Caring

    May 26, 2014 | 20 min
    Hosted by: Maurice Pickard Host Dr. Maurice Pickard welcomes author, Richard Colgan, MD, Professor of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. In this second interview, Dr. Colgan highlights the importance of developing the personal skill sets beyond the technical skills taught in medical school and residency, such as communicating with patients, having empathy, and being respectful. Download and listen today!
  • Advice to the Healer: On the Art of Caring

    May 19, 2014 | 21 min
    Hosted by: Maurice Pickard The healing professions have an ancient and venerable tradition of service, honor, and humanism that is often communicated from teacher to student in anecdotes and bits of wisdom told quickly in passing. In his book, Advice to the Healer: On the Art of Caring, Dr. Richard Colgan, Professor of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, expertly gathers together this type of valuable information in one place. Joining host Dr. Maurice Pickard, this discussion features biographies of historical luminaries in medicine, tales from everyday practice, inspirational quotes, and advice for new and veteran healers alike. 
  • Asleep: The Forgotten Epidemic that Remains One of Medicine's Greatest Mysteries

    May 12, 2014 | 21 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell Author and journalist Molly Caldwell Crosby joins host Dr. John Russell to discuss her second book, Asleep: The Forgotten Epidemic that Remains One of Medicine's Greatest Mysteries. Asleep is another fascnating look into medical history.  In the 1920s and '30s, a team of neurologists investigated a rare but disturbing group of patients spread across various hospitals and insane asylums to try to solve the worldwide epidemic of encephalitis lethargica, or sleeping sickness. Tune in and listen today!
  • The American Plague: The Untold Story of Yellow Fever, the Epidemic that Shaped Our History

    May 5, 2014 | 21 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell Host Dr. John Russell welcomes author and journalist Molly Caldwell Crosby to discuss her first book, THE AMERICAN PLAGUE: The Untold Story of Yellow Fever, the Epidemic That Shaped Our History. The discussion focuses on one of history's most controversial human studies - the story of yellow fever and how it overshadowed this country, and in Africa, where even today it strikes thousands every year. Download and listen today!
  • Final Exam: A Surgeon's Reflections on Mortality

    Apr 28, 2014 | 20 min
    Hosted by: Maurice Pickard When Dr. Pauline Chen began medical school, she dreamed of saving lives. What she could not predict was how much death would be a part of her work. Almost immediately, she found herself wrestling with medicine's most profound paradox-that a profession premised on caring for the ill also systematically depersonalizes dying. Drawing from her authored work, Final Exam, Dr. Chen describes the course of her education and practice as she struggled to reconcile the lessons of her training with her innate sense of empathy and humanity. Hosted by Dr. Maurice Pickard.
  • Surgeon in Blue: Jonathan Letterman, the Civil War Doctor Who Pioneered Battlefield Care

    Apr 7, 2014 | 20 min
    Hosted by: Maurice Pickard Dr. Maurice Pickard welcomes author Scott McGaugh to discuss the subject of his book "Surgeon in Blue: Jonathan Letterman, the Civil War Doctor Who Pioneered Battlefield Care." Through their discussion, listeners will discover how one lone surgeon, Jonathan Letterman, reshaped military medicine over the course of four major Civil War battles and a single year. Letterman, confronted by thousands of wounded lying abandoned on the battlefield, a sickly and malnourished Union army, and obscenely filthy military camps, took steps that make battlefield survival possible for our soldiers today.
  • Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital

    Mar 24, 2014 | 21 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell In her book, Five Days at Memorial, physician and reporter Sheri Fink reconstructs 5 days at Memorial Medical Center and draws the reader into the lives of those who struggled mightily to survive and to maintain life amid chaos. Drawing from a culmination of six years of reporting, Dr. Fink unspools the mystery of what happened in those days, bringing listeners into a hospital fighting for its life and into a conversation about the most terrifying form of health care rationing.  
  • League of Denial: The NFL, Concussions and the Battle for Truth

    Mar 17, 2014 | 21 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell In December 2005, the National Football League produced a scientific paper concluding that "professional football players do not sustain frequent repetive blows to the brain on a regular basis." That judgment, implausible even to a casual fan, also contradicted the opinion of a growing cadre of neuroscientists who worked in vain to convince the NFL that it was facing a deadly new scourge: a chronic brain disease that was driving an alarming number of players -- including some of the all-time greats -- to madness. In this conversation with Mark Fainaru-Wada, author of League of Denial, the NFL's apparent efforts to cover up and deny mounting evidence of the connecti...
  • Scurvy: How a Surgeon, a Mariner, and a Gentlemen Solved the Greatest Medical Mystery of the Age of Sail

    Mar 10, 2014 | 20 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell From the 15th to the mid-19th centuries, scurvy caused more deaths at sea than storms, shipwrecks, combat and all other diseases combined, according to author Stephen Bown. In this remarkable discussion, Bown talks about the harrowing path toward the cure for scurvy. While ranking among the greatest of human accomplishments, its impact on history has, until now, been largely ignored.
  • Pox Americana: The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82

    Mar 3, 2014 | 16 min
    Hosted by: John J. Russell A horrifying epidemic of smallpox was sweeping across North America when the War of Independence began, and until now we have known almost nothing about it. Author Elizabeth A. Fenn is the first historian to reveal how deeply Variola affected the outcome of the war in every colony and the lives of everyone on the continent. Join Dr. John Russell in exploring Fenn's innovative work, which brings to light how this megatragedy was met and what its consequences were for the young republic.
  • The Power of Habit

    Dec 16, 2013 | 15 min
    One of the age-old questions on human behavior is why we do the things we do. Are our habits ingrained, and if so, how do we break the behavioral cycles they produce? Investigating these and other questions is Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit, whose work takes readers to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. Hosted by Dr. John Russell.
  • The Panic Virus: The True Story Behind the Vaccine-Autism Controversy

    Nov 25, 2013 | 17 min
    In 1998 Andrew Wakefield, a British gastroenterologist with a history of self-promotion, published a paper with a shocking allegation: the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine might cause autism. The media seized hold of the story and, in the process, helped to launch one of the most devastating health scares ever. Yet despite the numerous studies that failed to find any link between childhood vaccines and autism, it has since been popularized by media personalities, and declining vaccination rates have led to outbreaks of deadly illnesses like Hib, measles, and whooping cough. In The Panic Virus: The True Story Behind the Vaccine-Autism Controversy, author Seth Mnookin draws on interviews with par...
  • Flu: The Story Of The Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus that Caused It

    Nov 18, 2013 | 12 min
    500,000 Americans died over a 6 week period; is this the latest thriller from Hollywood, or a piece of American history? Joining host Dr. John Russell to elaborate is Gina Kolata, acclaimed reporter for The New York Times and author of Flu: The Story Of The Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus that Caused It. In Flu, Ms. Kolata unravels the mystery of this lethal virus. From Alaska to Norway, from the streets of Hong Kong to the corridors of the White House, Kolata tracks the race to recover the live pathogen and probes the fear that has impelled government policy ever since. A gripping work of science writing, Flu addresses the prospects for a great epidemic's recur...
  • Final Exam: A Surgeon's Reflections on Mortality

    Nov 18, 2013 | 15 min
    When Dr. Pauline Chen began medical school, she dreamed of saving lives. What she could not predict was how much death would be a part of her work. Almost immediately, she found herself wrestling with medicine's most profound paradox-that a profession premised on caring for the ill also systematically depersonalizes dying. Drawing from her authored work, Final Exam, Dr. Chen describes the course of her education and practice as she struggled to reconcile the lessons of her training with her innate sense of empathy and humanity. Hosted by Dr. Maurice Pickard.
  • Surgeon in Blue: Jonathan Letterman, the Civil War Doctor Who Pioneered Battlefield Care

    Aug 26, 2013 | 19 min
    Dr. Maurice Pickard welcomes author Scott McGaugh to discuss the subject of his book "Surgeon in Blue: Jonathan Letterman, the Civil War Doctor Who Pioneered Battlefield Care." Through their discussion, listeners will discover how one lone surgeon, Jonathan Letterman, reshaped military medicine over the course of four major Civil War battles and a single year. Letterman, confronted by thousands of wounded lying abandoned on the battlefield, a sickly and malnourished Union army, and obscenely filthy military camps, took steps that make battlefield survival possible for our soldiers today.
  • God's Hotel: a Doctor, a Hospital, and a Pilgrimage to the Heart of Medicine

    Aug 5, 2013 | 16 min
    San Francisco's Laguna Honda Hospital is the last almshouse in the country, a descendant of the Hotel-Dieu (God's Hotel) that cared for the sick in the Middle Ages. Ballet dancers and rock musicians, professors and thieves - "anyone who had fallen, or, often, leapt, onto hard times" and needed extended medical care - ended up there. Dr. Victoria Sweet ended up there herself, as a physician. And though she came for only a two-month stay, she remained for twenty years. God's Hotel tells the story of a hospital, which - as efficiency experts, politicians, and architects descended, determined to turn it into a modern "health care facility" - revealed its truths about the cost and value of caring...
  • Rabid: A Cultural History of the World's Most Diabolical Virus

    Jul 29, 2013 | 15 min
    A maddened creature, frothing at the mouth, lunges at an innocent victim and, with a bite, transforms its prey into another raving monster. It's a scenario that underlies our darkest tales of supernatural horror, but its power derives from a very real virus, a deadly scourge known to mankind from our earliest days. In this fascinating exploration, journalist Bill Wasik and veterinarian Monica Murphy speak with host Dr. John Russell about the history, science, and cultural mythology of rabies as described in their book "Rabid."
  • The Road Back: A Journey of Grace and Grit

    Jul 22, 2013 | 18 min
    Matthew Miller had just pedaled up a mountain pass. He was 20, a member of the University of Virginia triathlon club, so fit his resting pulse was 42! He was on top of the world in so many ways, in love, with dreams of attending medical school. And then, cycling along the Blue Ridge Parkway in Virginia, tragedy struck. The real story is not what happened, but what happened after. Host Dr. John Russell is joined by Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Michael Vitez to share the humbling story of Matt's survival and recovery. The author first chronicled Matt Miller's story for his newspaper, The Philadelphia Inquirer. The response from readers was so overwhelming - and Matt's continued recovery s...
  • Revolution In Mind: Freud's Beginnings and the Creation of Psychoanalysis

    Feb 18, 2013 | 13 min
    Sex, conflict, ids and egos - our guest today has authored "The Revolution in Mind: The Creation of Psychoanalysis" which instructs us in the history of this movement and how innovators like Freud and Jung can be viewed through the lens of their cultural times. Host Dr. Leslie Lundt welcomes the Director of the Institute for the History of Psychiatry at Cornell Weill Medical College, George Makari, MD to discuss his latest book.

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