Inspired to Act

Inspired to Act

Episodes

  • Misdiagnosis and Other 'Thinking Errors'

    Aug 25, 2014 | 13 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Jerome Groopman Is there any way for clinicians to avoid misdiagnosis and other 'thinking errors'? Host Dr. Martin Samuels discusses this important topic with researcher, physician, and author Dr. Jerome Groopman. Dr. Groopman explores some of the unintended consequences of targeted medical research and 'the Christopher Reeve effect.'
  • The Modern Doctor: Clinician or Technician?

    Aug 18, 2014 | 13 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Faith Fitzgerald Do physicians have time to be clinicians, or has their role shifted to that of technician? This far-ranging conversation between Inspired to Act host Dr. Martin A. Samuels and Dr. Faith Fitzgerald, noted internist, distinguished professor, and associate dean of humanities and bioethics at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, covers this topic and others, including simulated patients, medical errors and pay-for-performance.
  • US Medical Education and Healthcare: The View From Abroad

    Aug 11, 2014 | 13 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Jaime Toro Are there lessons to be learned about the US healthcare system — both in terms of patient care and medical education — from physicians practicing abroad? Joining host Dr. Martin Samuels to discuss this and other topics is noted neurologist and educator Dr. Jaime Toro.
  • Implanting the First Artificial Heart

    Aug 4, 2014 | 14 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Denton Cooley In April, 1969, the first artificial heart was implanted as a bridge until a human heart could be implanted. It was hailed as a milestone medical treatment, but the ethical implications were widely debated as well. The heart surgeon who performed this ground-breaking surgery, in addition to devising pioneering surgical treatments for infants and children and founding the Texas Heart Institute, Dr. Denton Cooley, is Dr. Martin Samuels' guest.
  • Can Medical Leadership Be Taught?

    Jul 28, 2014 | 14 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Joseph B. Martin Are great medical leaders made or born? Can great leadership be developed? What is it about certain personalities that brings people to collaborate while other personalities foster dissension? Joining host Dr. Martin Samuels to discuss these topics is the former dean of both the Harvard Medical school and the University of California, San Francisco, Dr. Joseph B. Martin.
  • Ask the Neurologist: Dr. Samuels Answers Your Questions

    Jul 21, 2014 | 13 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Host Dr. Martin A. Samuels, neurologist-in-chief and chairman of the department of neurology at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, answers your questions about promising therapies for ALS, the role of exercise for Parkinson's disease patients, sleep apnea, and more. If you are a healthcare professional and have a question you want to ask the neurologist, email it to inspired@reachmd.com.
  • Medical Journalism and Activism

    Jul 14, 2014 | 14 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Marcia Angell Dr. Marcia Angell moved into the field of medical journalism from a career in pathology. She was the first woman to serve as editor-in-chief of the New England Journal of Medicine, and since leaving that post, has written frequently in professional journals and public press on a wide range of topics. Outspoken and frequently controversial, Dr. Angell joins host Dr. Martin Samuels to discuss her career.
  • Making Clinical Trials More Relevant

    Jul 7, 2014 | 13 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Steven Nissen How can clinical trials be made above reproach? How can a healthcare professional best interpret the results of clinical trials? Dr. Steven Nissen, chairman of the department of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic and past-president of the American College of Cardiology, joins Host Dr. Martin A. Samuels to discuss these and other topics
  • Doctor-Patient Communications

    Jun 23, 2014 | 14 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: G. Timothy Johnson Communicating with our patients is one of the most crucial aspects of our work, and an area which is always evolving and we constantly work to improve. Joining host Dr. Martin Samuels in this conversation is Dr. Timothy Johnson, who, as medical editor and medical commentator on ABC News, arguably speaks to more patients per year than almost any other doctor in America.
  • Real Issues in End of Life Care

    Jun 16, 2014 | 13 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Ira Byock Does discussion of end-of-life issue have to devolve into questions about physician-assisted suicide or so-called death panels? Joining host Dr. Martin Samuels is Dr. Ira Byock, director of palliative medicine at Dartmouth-Hitchcok Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire. They discuss why this area of medicine is so important, how to better instruct medical students in the field, and the role of compassion in end-of-life care.
  • World Class: Sir Roger Bannister's Career in Sports & Neurology

    Jun 9, 2014 | 13 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Sir Roger Bannister Does overcoming defeat and reversal in sports lead to success in career? Joining host Dr. Martin Samuels is Sir Roger Bannister, who as a medical student in May, 1954, shattered a barrier in athletics that many believe stands as one of the greatest athletic accomplishments of the 20th century. But success did not come easily to Sir Roger. He and Dr. Samuels discuss breaking the record, and then choosing to retire as a running and begin his "real" career as a world class neurologist.
  • Teaching Wellness As a Way of Life

    Jun 2, 2014 | 2 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Michael Roizen You get to control how well and long you live. That is the assertion of Dr. Michael Roizen, chief wellness officer at the Cleveland Clinic. He discusses the topic of wellness with host Dr. Martin Samuels. They also discuss ways wellness re-invigorates primary care, how lifestyle re-education increases longevity, and how wellness and prevention need to be part of the future of medicine.
  • A Transplantation Pioneer Looks Forward

    May 26, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Thomas Starzl Now in his 80s, Dr. Thomas E. Starzl is actively pursing his latest research interests and gives no indication of slowing down. He is widely known as the father of transplantation. But what is not widely known is that his early work was in neurophysiology. What made him choose surgery? What was it like when he was doing his pioneering transplantation work? What is he researching now? Host Dr. Martin Samuels and Dr. Thomas Starzl discuss.
  • Ask the Neurologist: Dr. Samuels Answers Your Questions

    May 19, 2014 | 2 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Host Dr. Martin A. Samuels, neurologist-in-chief and chairman of the department of neurology at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, answers your questions about promising therapies for ALS, the role of exercise for Parkinson's disease patients, sleep apnea, and more. If you are a healthcare professional and have a question you want to ask the neurologist, email it to inspired@reachmd.com.
  • Time, Peace, and Healing

    May 12, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Bernard Lown How can a physician be an activist in his or her patient's healing? Can that same physician be an activist in society's healing? Joining host Dr. Martin Samuels is Nobel Peace Prize recipient, noted cardiologist and author Dr. Bernard Lown. Among other topics, they discuss how time is critical in understanding the ailments of the patient, and individual physician's responsibility to society.
  • Stigmatized Medicine and the Physician-Patient Relationship

    May 5, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Abraham Verghese What does treating a patient with a stigmatized illness teach a physician about treating all illness? Dr. Abraham Verghese, professor for the theory and practice of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, joins host Dr. Martin Samuels to discuss the effects of stigmatized medicine on the physician-patient relationship, and other topics.
  • Innovations in Distance Learning and CME Around the World

    Apr 28, 2014 | 15 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Sanjiv Chopra How can American learning institutions effectively disseminate medical knowledge around the world? What are some of the attributes of Continuing Medical Education that make it improve patient outcomes? Dr. Sanjiv Chopra, dean for continuing medical education at Harvard Medical School, discusses these topics and others with host Dr. Martin Samuels.
  • Ask the Neurologist

    Apr 21, 2014 | 2 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Host Dr. Martin A. Samuels, neurologist-in-chief and chairman of the department of neurology at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, answers listeners' emailed questions. 
  • Balancing Clinical Work and Research in a Surgical Career

    Apr 7, 2014 | 2 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Patricia Donahoe How does one go about crafting a pioneering medical career in practice as well as in research? Joining host Dr. Martin Samuels to discuss these themes in her own career is Dr. Patricia Donahoe, director of Massachusetts General Hospital's pediatric surgical research laboratories and chief emerita of pediatric surgical services.
  • How Neurologists See the World

    Mar 31, 2014 | 2 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Thomas Swift Is there a way that neurologists view the world that is different from other MDs? Are there lessons for all doctors based on this perspective? Host Dr. Martin Samuels talks with Dr. Thomas R. Swift, past-president of the American Academy of Neurology, about these and other topics.
  • Looking Back at the First Successful Human Organ Transplant

    Mar 17, 2014 | 14 min
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Joseph Murray Nobel Prize winner Dr. Joseph E. Murray discusses performing the first successful human kidney transplant, the value of teamwork, the future of the physician-scientist, and the patient side of the equation, in this far-ranging conversation led by host Dr. Martin Samuels.
  • Misdiagnosis and Other 'Thinking Errors'

    Mar 10, 2014 |
    Hosted by: Martin Samuels Guest: Jerome Groopman Is there any way for clinicians to avoid misdiagnosis and other 'thinking errors'? Host Dr. Martin Samuels discusses this important topic with researcher, physician, and author Dr. Jerome Groopman. Dr. Groopman explores some of the unintended consequences of targeted medical research and 'the Christopher Reeve effect.'
  • Making Clinical Trials More Relevant

    Dec 12, 2013 | 14 min
    How can clinical trials be made above reproach? How can a healthcare professional best interpret the results of clinical trials? Dr. Steven Nissen, chairman of the department of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic and past-president of the American College of Cardiology, joins Host Dr. Martin A. Samuels to discuss these and other topics.
  • Implanting the First Artificial Heart

    Dec 12, 2013 | 14 min
    In April, 1969, the first artificial heart was implanted as a bridge until a human heart could be implanted. It was hailed as a milestone medical treatment, but the ethical implications were widely debated as well. The heart surgeon who performed this ground-breaking surgery, in addition to devising pioneering surgical treatments for infants and children and founding the Texas Heart Institute, Dr. Denton Cooley, is Dr. Martin Samuels' guest.
  • Ask the Neurologist: Dr. Samuels Answers Your Questions

    Dec 12, 2013 | 13 min
    Host Dr. Martin A. Samuels, neurologist-in-chief and chairman of the department of neurology at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, answers your questions about promising therapies for ALS, the role of exercise for Parkinson's disease patients, sleep apnea, and more.
  • Traditional Values in Medicine: Do They Still Exist?

    Dec 12, 2013 | 13 min
    Do 'traditional values' still exist in the practice of medicine? Did they ever? Is medicine a calling? And what is the role of the individual physician in the greater profession? Dr. Allan Ropper, clinical neurologist, executive vice-chair of the department of neurology at Brigham and Women's Hospital, professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, and associate editor of the New England Journal of Medicine joins host Dr. Martin Samuels, to discuss these and other topics.
  • Time, Peace, and Healing

    Nov 25, 2013 | 13 min
    How can a physician be an activist in his or her patient's healing? Can that same physician be an activist in society's healing? Joining host Dr. Martin Samuels is a Nobel Peace Prize recipient, noted cardiologist and author Dr. Bernard Lown. Among other topics, they discuss how time is critical in understanding the ailments of the patient, and individual physician's responsibility to society.
  • Innovations in Distance Learning and CME Around the World

    Nov 11, 2013 | 15 min
    How can American learning institutions effectively disseminate medical knowledge around the world? What are some of the attributes of Continuing Medical Education that make it improve patient outcomes? Dr. Sanjiv Chopra, dean for continuing medical education at Harvard Medical School, discusses these topics and others with host Dr. Martin Samuels.
  • Misdiagnosis and Other ‘Thinking Errors’

    Sep 23, 2013 | 13 min
    Is there any way for clinicians to avoid misdiagnosis and other 'thinking errors'? Host Dr. Martin Samuels discusses this important topic with researcher, physician, and author Dr. Jerome Groopman. Dr. Groopman explores some of the unintended consequences of targeted medical research and 'the Christopher Reeve effect.'
  • Doctor-Patient Communications

    Jul 29, 2013 | 14 min
    Communicating with our patients is one of the most crucial aspects of our work, and an area which is always evolving and we constantly work to improve. Joining host Dr. Martin Samuels in this conversation is Dr. Timothy Johnson, who, as medical editor and medical commentator on ABC News, arguably speaks to more patients per year than almost any other doctor in America.
  • World Class: Sir Roger Bannister's Career in Sports & Neurology

    Jul 15, 2013 | 13 min
    Does overcoming defeat and reversal in sports lead to success in career? Joining host Dr. Martin Samuels is Sir Roger Bannister, who as a medical student in May, 1954, shattered a barrier in athletics that many believe stands as one of the greatest athletic accomplishments of the 20th century. But success did not come easily to Sir Roger. He and Dr. Samuels discuss breaking the record, and then choosing to retire as a running and begin his "real" career as a world class neurologist.
  • A Transplantation Pioneer Looks Forward

    Jun 24, 2013 | 13 min
    Now in his 80s, Dr. Thomas E. Starzl is actively pursing his latest research interests and gives no indication of slowing down. He is widely known as the father of transplantation. But what is not widely known is that his early work was in neurophysiology. What made him choose surgery? What was it like when he was doing his pioneering transplantation work? What is he researching now? Host Dr. Martin Samuels and Dr. Thomas Starzl discuss.

Chat About This Show