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June 6, 2024 38 mins
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(00:00):
So poor old Jerry Dyer. GavinNewsom just seems like he's not keeping his
promises. It's good, old Jerry. He told the City of Fresno in
twenty twenty two, in the bumperdays of twenty twenty two, we're gonna
give two hundred and fifty million dollarsof state funding to the City of Fresno.
It's gonna help support all this downtowndevelopment and infrastructure stuff, so that

(00:23):
maybe we could have ten thousand morepeople living in downtown, the grand downtown
revitalization that we've been talking about herein Fresno for the last twenty plus years.
So in twenty twenty two, weget that first fifty million flush with
all this COVID money in the statecoffers. We're feeling good making all these

(00:45):
grand promises. And then what happensnext year. Well, the next batch
of money, one hundred million dollarsthat was supposed to come to fresnoe in
twenty twenty three, well we don'tgot it, sorry, Jerry. So
we're gonna bump it off. We'regoing to bump it back by one year,
no problem. Jerry Dyer puts abrave face on it. Politicians and

(01:07):
Fresno put a brave face on it. They say, that's that's fine,
that's fine, We're okay, youknow, we can still do our planning.
Well, twenty twenty four comes aroundand we are now bumped by two
years. And here's the thing.Gavin Newsom is making a lot of people

(01:30):
upset with this kind of activity becausehe got everyone used to, a lot
of supporters, used to a certainkind of financial picture that was actually,
I think anomalous. And now thenorm, the norm that we are going

(01:51):
to the norm that we're going toface here in California. The guys who
host this Old House on PBS,one of them is named Norm and they
all have Boston accent. So Norm. Ever, every time I say the
word norm in front of my wife, we both go norm. The norm
in California politics, I think,is going to be one of scarcity.

(02:15):
The budget that we have built upand that we got used to through COVID
when we were getting all this federalmoney is not a budget we can sustain
in a post COVID world where wedon't have all that federal assistance, because
the revenue we're getting from taxpayers inCalifornia just is not enough. The revenue

(02:38):
we're getting from the most heavily taxedpopulation in the country is not enough.
And now Newsom's got the problem thatthere are people who are more of a
political threat to him getting angry athim than Jerry Dyer. So there's this

(02:58):
piece in The Americans Spectator written byEllie Guardie Holmes. Gavin Newsom is not
having a good time. Progressives areturning against him. California has reached a
point, she writes, where itis on a fundamental level, fiscally unsound.
The budget deficit, which by oneestimate amounts to seventy three billion dollars,

(03:21):
is not the result of an offyear that happened to generate lower revenues.
No, this is a structural problem. The disparity between tax revenues and
spending is so vast that the entiresystem, celebrated by liberals as a model
of progressive governance, is a houseof cards. And it was all built
by Governor Gavin Newsom, who choseextravagant progressive policies over maintaining a sustainable budget.

(03:45):
The insane overspending began the day Newsomtook office on January seventh, twenty
nineteen. At the time, radicalsat the state capitol were eager to create
the progressive utopia they had long envisionedbut had been unable to achieve under former
Governor Jerry Brown, who prioritized fissrestraint. In his inaugural address, Newsom
made it clear he would depart fromBrown's approach and pursue the realization of the

(04:06):
progressive vision. We will be prudentstewards of taxpayer dollars, pay down debts,
and meet our future obligations, hesaid. But let me be clear,
we will be bold, we willaim high, and we will work
like hell to get there. Ashis governorship began, Newsom revealed just how
bold he would be. Leading upto his inaugural address, Newsom promised he
would provide all Californians with two freeyears of college and toss a couple billion

(04:30):
extra toward early childhood programs. Then, in his first policy move, Newsom
announced he would extend free health carecoverage to illegal immigrants until they reached the
age of twenty six. In asign of how far to the left Democrats
were on the issue of immigration atthe time, Newsom pledged in his address
to make California a sanctuary to allwho seek it. Later, Newsom would
extend free health care coverage to allillegal immigrants. That's medical medical coverage totally,

(04:57):
does not matter what your legal immigrationstatuses or lack thereof. Lavish spending
might have initially pleased Newsom's constituencies andendeared him to radical California Democrats, but
it has led him to a dayof reckoning. Those who once loved him
because he rained money on them arenow turning against him as he implements cuts

(05:17):
to their programs. The rift wasmade evident in May when the California Teachers
Association, a stalwart Newsom ally thathas benefited handsomely from his tight relationship from
its tight relationship with the governor,released an advertisement that bordered on an attack
against him. Tell lawmakers and GavinNewsom to pass a state budget that protects

(05:39):
public schools for our students and communities, said the ad. The union invested
an unknown amount to broadcast these adson television in California. Additionally, the
group's president, David Goldberg, publiclyopposed Newsom's plan to use an accounting maneuver
to maintain school budgets, a tacticthat would nullify Newsom's guarantees on education funding

(05:59):
and fear years. It was ashocking turn of events as the union has
donated hundreds of thousands to Newsom.In this case, the harsh tactics proved
successful. Politico reported last week theNewsom and the Teachers Association that come to
an agreement that would guarantee additional billionsin education spending increases in coming years.
Now, even Planned Parenthood, whohas also benefited enormously under Newsom's governorship,

(06:23):
has turned. The president of PlannedParent Affiliates of California, Jody Hicks,
blasted Newsom in a series of postson x last month over healthcare funding decreases.
The governor announced in his May revisalof the state budget. Planned Parenthood
in California is deeply disappointed by theproposal and the California Governors may revise that
will jeopardize access to not just sexualand reproductive care, but quality, affordable

(06:47):
healthcare across the board for the nearlyfifteen million Californians who rely on medical said
Hicks. Such comments are far removedfrom the tight relationship the abortion group previously
had with Newsom, who in twentynineteen doubled the states spending on quote,
reproductive health from fifty million to onehundred million, a significant amount of which

(07:08):
went to Planned Parenthood. So wecan go on. But basically Newsome is
starting to anger some of the keycornerstones of his existing constituency. Why because

(07:28):
he got them used to you know, caviare bonbonds and you know prime grade
steak, And now all of asudden he realizes he can't afford anything more
than hamburger. And let's understand thetwo groups that they mention here, teachers'

(07:50):
unions and Planned Parenthood. These arerepresentative of the two most powerful forces in
state government. Labor unions in Californiarule the roost. They run California politics.
How thoroughly do they run California politics, you may ask. The labor

(08:13):
unions don't even bother anymore with thenormal thing of just giving campaign donations to
a politician and then that politician votesthe way they want. They've gone to
the level of just run labor unionexecutives for seats in the state Assembly in
the state Senate. Just cut outthe middleman, get the seat yourself,

(08:39):
all right. Some of you mightremember Lorena Gonzalez she was a State Assembly
member from the San Diego area formany many years. She was the chair
basically of the She was chair ofthe Assembly Appropriations Committee. So that's one
of the most powerful positions in thewhole in the entire of California government,

(09:01):
the chairs of the Senate and theAssembly appropriations committees. Why because basically they
give the up or down vote.They give the thumbs up or the thumbs
down for any bill that's gonna spendmoney in California. So it's an incredibly
powerful position. She's the gal whoauthored AB five that reclassified all kinds of

(09:22):
different workers from independent contractors to parttime employees, which was a massive boon
for the labor unions. She wasa labor union official before she ran for
the Assembly, and she's right backas a labor union executive now now that
she's term limited out of the Assembly. So that's the kind of people who

(09:46):
are running the legislature. And thereare several other members of the state legislature
who that was their former job beinglabor union officials. So the teachers you
unions, which is the most powerfulgroup of unions, public sector unions,
they have tons of members, theyhave tons of money. They give tons

(10:07):
of money. They have given tonsof money to Newsom. You've got the
teachers' unions, and then you've gotPlanned Parenthood. Now it's not that Planned
Parenthood itself is so big, orso wealthy or so powerful, but they're
the leading edge for social liberalism inCalifornia. And if they're upset at Gavin

(10:37):
Newsom, and they are. Andit's also this, Sometimes groups are angry,
and what Gavin Newsom is fearful ofis not the group itself, it's
the donors who fund that group.Nobody's really afraid. I think of the

(11:00):
Sierra Club. They're afraid of thegazillionaire donors who fund the Sierra Club.
Nobody's afraid of Planned Parenthood, makingplanned parenthood mad. They're afraid of the
big time donors who politically support plannedparenthood. That's what they're afraid of.

(11:26):
So is Gavin Newsom nervous about aboutall of this? I think we're gonna
find out a lot in the nextfew months, well probably post November,
we're gonna know. I think GavinNewsom doesn't really have a ton to worry
about from ticking off all of thesepeople. Why Well, because the audience

(11:50):
he's playing for is still pretty small, and it's also a little different.
Gavin Newsom's eye is on the presidencynow, it's not really on California.
I'll talk about this more when wereturn. This is the John Girardi Show

(12:11):
on Power Talk. Big story inthe American Spectator about how Gavin Newsom is
ticking off some of the most importantallies and backers he has in California,
namely Planned Parenthood representing all the socialliberals who back him, and the California

(12:31):
Teachers Association representing organized labor. They'reboth mad at him, and that's not
usually. That's not a great placeto be in if you're a California politician,
if you're a Democrat and you wantto win in California, what do
you need. Well, you needto have your social liberal bona fidez proved,
and you need the backing of organizedlabor because organized labor runs California.

(12:56):
But is that really what Gavin Newsomcares about? First of all, from
Newsom's perspective, like what do thesepeople want from him? The state is
facing the deficit that it faces,and this is a problem the Democrat governors

(13:18):
of California have always sort of hadto deal with, is that the buck
really does stop with them when itcomes to spending, Like you have to
balance the budget or come close.You cannot just spend in the red forever.
If you're a state government, youjust can't spend in the red forever.
And individual assembly members introducing and votingon bills for spending or voting on

(13:43):
a budget, they don't care.It's not you know, it's not their
rear end on the line. They'renot the final decision maker. They're just
one of a group of eighty orfor the state Senate, a group of
forty, so they don't care.The governor has to come up with something
thing, He has to come upwith something that gets somewhere close to being

(14:07):
a balanced budget. So the youknow, so what do these people want
from him? Like he has tocut something. He has to cut something
to get from a seventy three billiondollar deficit or whatever the number is.
And different people give you different numbersbased on how they you know, how
much they squint. And Newsom's numberdoesn't sound as disastrous as that seventy three

(14:28):
billion, But he's got to cutsomething. There's no other way. So
on the one hand, I thinkNewsom can come back to these groups and
say, hey, listen, Igotta do something here. I gave you

(14:48):
so much more money, like you'reand you're coming at me like this,
like come on, let's work together. And and Newsom has enough of a
relationship in history with these groups thathe can sit down and work with them,
and maybe he just gives away thestore at the end of the day.
Maybe maybe he doesn't feel the samekind of responsibility for physical responsibility you
know that Jerry Brown felt back inthe day. But here's the thing,

(15:11):
I just don't know that Gavin Newsomreally is afraid anymore of what the Teachers'
Union necessarily thinks about him, orwhat even like California Planned Parenthood thinks about
him. Gavin Newsom is playing fora very small select audience of about I

(15:35):
don't know, three hundred people,give or take literally about three hundred give
or take ultra wealthy people, andprobably the number smaller than that. Even
California is the home to a lotof the United States big money political donor

(15:58):
class on the right end on theleft, Okay, you go to Orange
County for some of these political thingsconservative political things that happen down there.
There's a ton of big time nationalGOP fundraising that happens down in Orange County.
There are even one or two peopleup here in Fresno. Okay,

(16:19):
the California GOP can't do jack squat, and I think a lot of those
big time donors are tired of youknow, they're they're not funding a bunch
of people in California too much,but they are funding national Republican causes anyway.
Similarly with Democrats, Okay, thebig time national Democrat money, a

(16:45):
lot of it is based here.It's in Silicon Valley, and it's with
these old money types in San Francisco. Like it's no surprise that Nancy Pelosi
was the Speaker of the House forso long, or the Democrat leader slash
Democrat Speaker of the House for solong. Why because a lot of them
lived right in her district and shecould bump over to Marin County. Anyway,

(17:11):
Look at all the major Look lookat the swathe of major Democrat powerbrokers
in California. They're all San Franciscopeople, Nancy Pelosi, Gavin Newsom,
Kamala Harris. This is where allthe big money in Democrat politics is and

(17:33):
it's that money that Newsom has reliedon for his whole career, his entire
his pre political career. Even so, all the wine shops and the businesses
that Newsom had before he entered politics, you know who was a big investor
in almost all of them was GordonGetty. The Getty family, like the

(17:56):
Getty Museum, Getty's, the GettyOil Company, Getty's. Okay. Newsom's
dad was an attorney for the Gettyfamily. Gavin Newsom grew up with Gordon
Getty. They're lifelong friends. Gordoninvested in all of Newsom's businesses. Gordon
was part of the Willie Brown magiccircle of elite San Francisco political donors.

(18:19):
And that's how Gavin Newsom got intopolitics via Gordon Getty, via Willy Brown.
Willy Brown appoints him to be acounty supervisor, basically for City of
San Francisco, which is kind ofits own county, and from there Newsom's
career took off. Newsom knows thiscrowd depends on this crowd, relies on

(18:45):
this crowd, and this is thecrowd that he needs to placate between now
and twenty twenty eight. So forthe next four years, his chief job
is to keep this crowd of peoplehappy, if not sooner, if not
sooner than twenty twenty eight, maybetwenty twenty four, maybe a few months

(19:07):
from now. I think that's unlikelyfor a lot of reasons. But I
don't think it's out of the realmof the It's not out of the realm
of the possible. But that's thecrowd Newsom has to please. Newsom does
not give a flying rats. Youknow what if he breaks a promise to

(19:32):
Jerry Dyer, I guarantee you thatGavin Newsom loses zero sleep over. Oh
sorry, Jerry Dyer. That twohundred million dollars the city of Fresno was
supposed to get, you know,in twenty three and twenty four, looks
like maybe you'll get it in twentyfive and twenty six. Maybe I don't
think we're ever going to get it. We're not gonna get the whole thing,

(19:55):
that's for darn sure. I mean, there's just some fundamental math that
does not work with letting Fresno gettwo hundred million more dollars. There's just
some fundamental political and math realities thatI think do not add up. So

(20:19):
does is Newsom scared about ticking offthe teachers Association? I mean, clearly
he kind of jumped when they saidto because I think, you know,
he still needs to kind of keephim in his fold for the next couple
of years as he's finishing up histerm as governor. But I don't think
he's as scared of them anymore.In the same way on the national stage,

(20:41):
the California Teachers Association, how muchdo they matter? How much does
organized labor really matter? On thenational Democrat level. It's still significant,
It's still important. It's not Idon't think he can antagonize them. But
the main people that Newsom has tokeep happy, I think he is keeping

(21:02):
quite happy. I think he hasknown these people and cultivated relationships with these
people for years, and that's thecrowd that he's responsive to. I just
don't think, you know, wecan point out how Planned Parenthood of California
is mad at him for you know, cutting some different various healthcare things.

(21:22):
I there's no way Planned Parenthood couldbe really that discontented with Gavin Newsom.
No one has been a better friendto Planned Parenthood than he has. This
is posturing on their part. They'rejust trying to ring every single dollar they
can out of the state. Theboons that Newsom has done for the California

(21:44):
Teachers Association. I mean, theyare trying again to ring every single dollar
they can out of the state.That's all this is. I don't think
Newsom is afraid and again these arenot. This is not the crowd.
Newsom needs to kind of play casethem to keep the last years of his
governorship kind of smooth through twenty twentysix. But this is not the crowd

(22:08):
that he needs to keep happy.The crowd he needs to keep happy are
again, it's maybe three hundred people. It's all these people who you know
would go to fancy outdoor garden partieswith Nancy Pelosi. That's the crowd.
That's the crowd he needs to keephappy, and he's doing that. When

(22:30):
we return, a sudden uptick intalk about Joe Biden's age and do we
believe the polls next on the JohnGirardi Show. So we're all of a
sudden starting to get some rumblings aboutBiden's mental state and mental sharpness. I

(22:51):
Mean, people talk about it alot because it's impossible to hide, and
especially after the release of the transcriptsfrom his interview last year with Special Counsel
her who's investigating him for keeping documentsat his house. Which the more I
think about that whole episode, themore unsatisfied I feel with it. It's
like, yes, we obviously uncoveredevidence that he very deliberately did this.

(23:17):
He obviously knew that what he wasdoing was wrong. We have all this
evidence pointing to it, but we'rejust not going to prosecute him because a
jury would probably think that he's asweet, nice, senile old man and
that he's senile now, so thereforewe shouldn't prosecute him for stuff he did
then when he probably still knew whathe was doing. The fact that Biden

(23:44):
is not getting prosecuted, or thatthe Justice Department didn't recommend at the very
least, the Justice Department didn't sayBiden is probably worthy of being prosecuted at
this point, but we face theburden of he's the sitting president of the
United States and whether the sitting presidentof the United States is subject to prosecution

(24:06):
or whether he has immunity. Like, the more and more I think about
that whole thing, the more unsatisfiedI feel with it. Anyway, we're
starting to have another little bit ofa spike in talk about Biden's lack of
mental sharpness. So the Wall StreetJournal was able to run a piece.

(24:26):
They got some sources to talk.Here's their description, and this drives with,
you know, the stuff that KevinMcCarthy has said, actually publicly since
Kevin McCarthy left a speaker, hewas very openly saying, yeah, it's
ridiculous when President This from the WallStreet Journal. When President Biden met with

(24:47):
congressional leaders in the West Wing inJanuary to negotiate a Ukraine funding deal,
he spoke so softly at times thatsome participants struggled to hear him. According
to five people familiar with the meeting, he read from notes to make obvious
points, paused for extended periods,and sometimes closed his eyes for so long

(25:07):
that some of the room wondered whetherhe had tuned out. In a February
one on one chat in the Ovaloffice with House Speaker Mike Johnson, the
President said a recent policy changed byhis administration that jeopardizes some big energy projects
was just a study. According tosix people told at the time, about
what Johnson said had happened. Johnsonworried the president's memory had slipped about the

(25:32):
details of his own policy. Lastyear, when Biden was negotiating with House
Republicans to lift the death ceiling,his demeanor and command of the details seemed
to shift from one day to thenext. According to then how Speaker Kevin
McCarthy and two others familiar with thetalks, on some days he had loose
and spontaneous exchanges with Republicans, andon others he mumbled and appeared to rely

(25:53):
on notes. I used to meetwith him when he was vice president.
I'd go to his house, McCarthysaid in an interview, He's not the
same person now. Why is therethis uptick? And I think it ties

(26:15):
in a conversation with my mom aboutthis the other day where and I think
my mom is reflective of the concernsof a lot of conservatives. Biden doesn't
seem worried about his poll numbers.Biden doesn't seem particularly concerned that the only

(26:37):
Democrats who seem really concerned about itare people on the outside, So chattering
heads on the outside, like theJames Carrvills of the world. Now I
think I would. You know,I don't like James Carville by any stretch,
but I feel like I would trusthis political instincts. You know,
if there's one thing the guy's goodat, it's having people be elected president

(26:59):
and or you know, a primeminister of Israel. James Carville is good
at politics. Okay with say whatyou will about him personally or anything else.
Do you think about him? JamesCarrville is really good at politics,
and if he's really concerned about Biden, it's probably a decent reason to be
concerned. But at the same time, Carville's not in it. He's not

(27:22):
actively working for the Biden campaign.He's not seeing all the numbers that the
Biden camp is seeing, and theBiden camp is sort of doesn't seem too
worried, and the President doesn't seemtoo worried. There's reporting that the President
is actually fairly closely monitoring polls andhe's trying to tell people both publicly and

(27:45):
privately, that the polls are justnot reflective of where the country really is
right now. And there's some sortof sense that the groups that are disaffected
with Biden right now and who areresulting in him bleeding support young people,
Latino voters, African American voters,that those voters are going to come back

(28:10):
home, or as some conservative suspective, this is the suspicion of other conservatives,
and frankly, after the Trump trial, I guess I don't know why
we shouldn't exclude it from the realmof possibility. After all, through the
Trump trial you see Democrats willing todo any kind of dirty Shenanigan possible to

(28:30):
get Trump. Is the fix in? Somehow do they think that, you
know, the kinds of networks ofwhether flat out illegal things or just legal
ways in which they can shift thevote on election day? Do they have
enough of a fix in that they'rejust not afraid of Biden really losing?

(28:56):
Well, I guess I'm just I'mnot sure if it's a thing of Democrats
are really not that concerned, orthe Democrats who are running this are delusional.

(29:17):
Clearly Biden is and the fact thatthis man is still being allowed by
his family to run for president isrevolting. Makes you really kind of raise
your eyebrows about Jill Biden and herinvolvement in all of this, Like,

(29:38):
how is it that I just cannotfathom being the spouse of someone who is
obviously in this kind of a conditionand saying, yes, continue to be
president of the United States for anotherfour years. This is definitely good for
you and for everybody else. No, it like he's he's so obviously not

(30:02):
well. So maybe it's just athing of So you've got two problems.
Biden is not well. On theone hand, the alternative to Biden is
also terrible. The alternative to Bidenis Kamala Harris, and I think that

(30:25):
people she is such a terrible alternativethat that's why nobody is pulling the trigger
on getting rid of Biden or sayingthat Biden should be got rid of.
She's a disaster. If it's herversus Trump, Trump will clean her clock
seven days a week and twice onSundays. So I so you've got Biden

(30:52):
is already there, and he's notso far gone mentally that I think the
cabinet does and feel like they couldtrigger a twenty fifth Amendment thing against him.
In fairness, I think that wouldbe a really destabilizing thing for any
cabinet to trigger a twenty fifth Amendmentremoval of a president. Ever, so

(31:15):
they can't force Biden out. Theylet him in. They let him stay
in for the primaries. He's alreadywon all these seats. If you get
rid of him at the convention,you have to put in Harris. Why
do I say that just given theracial politics and the youth politics within the

(31:36):
Democratic Party, they're bleeding African Americanand Latino and young people's support as it
is. Do you really think thatthose African American voters are going to come
back into the fold, which iswhat they need to win? Do you
really think those African American voters aregoing to come back in if you pass
over a black woman in fame,you pass over a black woman to pick

(32:04):
Gavit Newsom or Pete Boodagic, becausethose are the options pretty much well,
once you get past Harris, thosetwo guys are probably your best bets.
How do you think if you've alreadygot African American voters disaffected with Joe Biden,
how do you think they're going tofeel about a Democrat ticket that passes

(32:25):
over Kamala Harris? How do youthink they're going to feel about a Democratic
ticket? And not just African Americanvoters, but also these young voters who
are so angry at Biden over Palestine. These people are all super into intersectional
politics, and they are the peoplefor whom you were, the people you

(32:47):
were placating by saying, I willonly pick an African American woman to be
my vice president, I will onlypick an African American woman to be my
Supreme Court justice. You pass overan African American woman for a white guy,
good luck, good luck getting thosepeople back, especially for someone like

(33:07):
Gavin Newsom, who is hardly aBernie sanderste Okay. He is not some
kind of socialist. He is asquarely in the Bidens sort of camp as
far as how he views corporate Americaand Texas and stuff. He's not gonna
appeal to the AOC types. SoI think Biden in his camp knows one

(33:32):
that the Democrats are stuck with him. They don't have any other options.
If you go to Harris, it'sa disaster. If you pass over Harris,
it's also a disaster. And Ithink what they're waiting on, and
I think the reason why they're notscared is the Trump conviction only happened like

(33:53):
six days ago. Trump's conviction andthe distinct possibility that he could go to
jail. Are the wild cards thatwe have no idea how they're going to
play out, And I think alot of people in the Biden camp are
probably just thinking there's no point agitatingover these polls. Right now. Trump

(34:17):
has been convicted of a felony.I think it was a bogus felony.
And the Democrats, I think theirwhole campaign was premised around that, around
successfully getting home a conviction against DonaldTrump before the election. When we return
how that plan was supposed to happenand where it's going next on the John

(34:37):
Girardi Show. So the whole Democratstrategy for this election was fairly transparent.
Trump did stuff at various points thatDemocrats thought could be grounds for criminal prosecution.

(34:58):
He had his Stormy dan Ks thingthat various prosecutors in New York were
looking at. Both. You hadthe Southern District of New York, the
federal prosecutors looked at it. Youhad the Manhattan DA's office looking at it.
You had his conduct surrounding January sixth. Was there something there that they
could cook up that they could turninto a crime that you have his conduct

(35:22):
in Georgia surrounding the events after theelection. Was he unduly trying to pressure
the governor or the attorney general orthe Secretary of State of Georgia in ways
that were inappropriate? Was the wayhe was setting up a possible alternate slate
of electors? Was there something fraudulentthere that they could cook up? And
then the mar A Lago documents thing. What a gift to Democrats that was

(35:47):
perfectly just dropped into their lap thathe's got all these classified documents that he's
probably not supposed to have in hishouse just sitting in boxes. Okay,
So the Democrats strategy was, webring these indictments around the start of the
Republican primary process because we know howthe Republican base will react to it.
The Republican base will get mad andthey will get defensive towards their guy because

(36:13):
they will think this is wildly inappropriate, which it was for pretty much all
those cases, I think, otherthan the other than the mar A Lago
documents case, which is only anappropriate insofar as they didn't also charge Biden
with the exact same thing anyway,So they knew the Republican base would get
angry at it. And note howthese indictments against Trump. They dropped like

(36:39):
very shortly after Ron De Santis enteredthe race, completely took the wins out
of ron De Santis, the sales. No one else even had a shot.
Nikki Haley never had a shot.Trump wins the Republican primary easily.
So the plan is they bring anindictment when the primary starts, and maybe

(37:01):
they get a conviction in twenty twentyfour. So basically from now until election
day, Joe Biden will be ableto talk about Donald Trump as convicted fellon
Donald Trump, convicted fellon Donald Trump, and not only talk about him as
convicted fellon Donald Trump. There's thedistinct possibility that Trump could go to jail,

(37:23):
that he could be incarcerated for muchof the remainder of the campaign,
if not for a long span oftime to come. So I think that's
why Biden isn't very scared right now, or he's talking a very big game.

(37:49):
There's so what do you do witha presidential nominee? Are people still
going to vote for a presidential nomineewho's in jail? Are they going to
vote for whoever his vice presidential pickis while he's sitting in jail. I
don't know. I don't think theywill, and I think that's the source
of Biden's confidence. That'll do it. John Jarroady Show, See you next

(38:09):
time on Power Talk
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