CJ Radio

CJ Radio

A weekly, hour-long newsmagazine on North Carolina, Carolina Journal Radio is hosted by Donna Martinez and Mitch Kokai and features a diverse mix of guests and topics. Education reform, tax policy, the state legislature, affirmative action, air pollution, freedom of the press and the courts – these are just a few of the subjects that Carolina Journal Radio has tackled since the program began production in 2003.

Episodes

February 1, 2021 47 min

If a state government agency wants to avoid complying with N.C. law, it might be able to accomplish its goal through a collusive lawsuit settlement. But state lawmakers could take steps this year to strike back against those settlements. Andy Jackson, director of the Civitas Center for Public Integrity at the John Locke Foundation, explains why the General Assembly should address the issue. The recent addition of Justice Amy Coney ...

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Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper and Republican Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson could present very different messages to N.C. voters and taxpayers in the years ahead. The two men previewed a divergent path during their public swearing-in ceremonies in Raleigh. While Cooper complained about the COVID-19 pandemic, racism, unaffordable health care, and unequal opportunity, Robinson emphasized the state’s successes. He pointed to his own story as Nor...

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From extended COVID-19 shutdowns to unexpected government fines, owners of alcohol-related businesses in North Carolina have faced special challenges in the past year. John Trump, Carolina Journal managing editor, recaps some of the industry’s key concerns. Bar owners and operators across North Carolina filed lawsuits just before the Christmas holiday. The suits challenge the executive orders Gov. Roy Cooper has used during the COV...

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After a month of uncertainty, Republican Paul Newby emerged as the eventual winner of the N.C. Supreme Court chief justice’s election, unseating incumbent Democrat Cheri Beasley. Rick Henderson, Carolina Journal editor-in-chief, assesses Newby’s likely impact as the leader of the state’s highest court and top officer in North Carolina’s judicial branch. American history has faced attacks in recent years. But a textbook titled Land ...

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The N.C. Association of Educators teachers union has been vocal about keeping brick-and-mortar schools closed to students during the COVID-19 pandemic. That’s despite the evidence of major learning loss. The union stance also ignores scientific arguments in favor of returning students to classrooms. Terry Stoops, John Locke Foundation vice president for research and director of education studies, explores NCAE’s opposition to resto...

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As we look forward to a new year, Carolina Journal Radio reviews some of the most interesting topics from 2020. Amy Coney Barrett has joined the U.S. Supreme Court as its 115th justice. She has said her judicial philosophy mirrors that of the late Justice Antonin Scalia, and supporters characterize her as an originalist. Jon Guze, John Locke Foundation director of legal studies, analyzes Barrett’s record. He discusses the new justi...

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The COVID-19 pandemic has produced both health and economic consequences. A new “misery index” attempts to document how those consequences have played out in states across the country. Joseph Coletti, John Locke Foundation senior fellow, explains why he developed the index. He explains how North Carolina compares to neighboring states and others throughout the United States. Gov. Roy Cooper set up a new bipartisan group to focus on...

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We still haven’t heard the final word on the 2020 election, but some observers are already looking ahead to North Carolina’s next big electoral contest. Voters will replace Republican Richard Burr in the U.S. Senate in 2022. Rick Henderson, Carolina Journal editor-in-chief, analyzes early announcements and speculation about a contest that could have a major impact on partisan control of Congress’ upper chamber. The federal governme...

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North Carolina welcomes a new state superintendent of public instruction in 2021. Republican Catherine Truitt will take the job after serving as leader of the online-only Western Governors University in this state. Truitt also served as former Republican Gov. Pat McCrory’s top education adviser. Terry Stoops, John Locke Foundation vice president for research and resident scholar, assesses Truitt’s top priorities in her job at the h...

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There’s an urgent need to return N.C. public school students to in-person instruction. That’s the message Terry Stoops hopes to send. The John Locke Foundation’s vice president for research and director of education studies explains why the science and data suggest that school kids face much more danger of long-lasting negative effects if they remain stuck in forced online learning. Republicans will maintain control of both chamber...

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Elections for president, U.S. Senate, and governor grabbed the headlines. But North Carolinians addressed many other items during the recent election, including local referendums on issues such as taxes, bonds, and alcohol. Joseph Coletti, John Locke Foundation senior fellow, analyzes the results of local referendum votes across the state. While Democrat Joe Biden has declared victory in the presidential race, President Trump appea...

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Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper will serve a second term as North Carolina state government’s chief executive officer. But voters have added three new Republicans to the group of elected executives making up the Council of State. Rick Henderson, Carolina Journal editor-in-chief, discusses Cooper’s re-election victory, the historic election of Mark Robinson as North Carolina’s first African-American lieutenant governor, and two other new...

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Amy Coney Barrett has joined the U.S. Supreme Court as its 115th justice. She has said her judicial philosophy mirrors that of the late Justice Antonin Scalia, and supporters characterize her as an originalist. Jon Guze, John Locke Foundation director legal studies, analyzes Barrett’s record. He discusses the new justice’s likely impact on the nation’s highest court. Those who want to reform higher education ought to look at govern...

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The races for president, governor, and U.S. Senate have been dominating N.C. headlines. But voters are making other important decisions in the next week. Rick Henderson, Carolina Journal editor-in-chief, assesses recent developments in races for offices such as lieutenant governor, superintendent of public instruction, state treasurer, and labor commissioner. North Carolina’s popular Opportunity Scholarship program faces a new lega...

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Debate about the COVID-19 pandemic has featured plenty of data involving case numbers, deaths, and hospitalizations. Dig into the details, and you learn that the numbers might not be as useful as they first appear. They might even portray a misleading picture. Jon Sanders, John Locke Foundation director of regulatory studies, discusses key aspects of his research into key COVID-19 numbers. Americans are paying much more attention t...

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Federal taxpayers cannot afford another bailout of state and local governments. Joseph Coletti, the John Locke Foundation’s senior fellow, explains why in a column he co-wrote for TheHill.com. Coletti contends most state governments have fared better than expected during the COVID-19 pandemic. Throwing more money at them now would lead to waste while continuing to drive up the multitrillion-dollar federal debt. High-profile Democra...

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Reaction to the nomination of federal Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court offers a reminder of progressives’ continuing attacks against the U.S. Constitution. Jon Guze, John Locke Foundation director of legal studies, analyzes Barrett’s nomination. He discusses the attacks Barrett faces because of her conservative jurisprudence. As the Supreme Court returns to action, Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute looks back at t...

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Gov. Roy Cooper and other advocates of Medicaid expansion in North Carolina argue consistently that expansion would not cost any state taxpayer dollars. A new analysis from the John Locke Foundation and the Ohio-based Buckeye Institute call that claim into question. A model based on enrollment estimates and Medicaid costs in expansion states suggests N.C. budget writers would face a gap of $119 million to $171 million to cover new ...

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The outcome of North Carolina’s U.S. Senate race could help determine which party controls the chamber for the next two years. Incumbent Republican Sen. Thom Tillis faces a tough challenge from Democrat Cal Cunningham. Carolina Journal Editor-in-Chief Rick Henderson analyzes recent developments in the hotly contested race. It’s safe to say N.C. colleges and universities did not reopen in the fall in the way they had expected. Some ...

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A Union County judge has approved a deal calling on the state of North Carolina to boost education spending by more than $400 million a year. It’s the first stage of a plan that would lead to billions of dollars of new spending. The money is tied to the long-running Leandro lawsuit. Terry Stoops, John Locke Foundation vice president for research and director of education studies, analyzes the latest developments in the quarter-cent...

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