Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

It’s Black History delivered in short, lively, fact-packed stories accessible to people of all ages and education levels. It’s fast, accurate U.S. history available in free video podcast recordings describing major historical events and introducing less well-known experiences involving Black Americans.

Episodes

January 21, 2022 3 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

From the inception of the United States, Black soldiers have answered the call to serve on the front lines. And in 1944, the US government created the GI Bill, providing benefits and offerings like job training, loans for school and access to mortgages for soldiers who serve their country.

The bill should have changed the landscape for Black soldiers returning home. However, spe...

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Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

In 1730, Job Ben Solomon  — a Senegalese man and active slave trader — was captured during an excursion in the Gambian River region. Once stateside, he was imprisoned for attempting to escape from Maryland.

After writing a letter to his family back home, it was intercepted by a prominent US figure, James Oglethorpe, who arranged Job’s freedom and sent him to London. From there, ...

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Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

As Black families left the South, their migration allowed them to bring their religion and musical practices along with them. But it would be one man in particular, Thomas Dorsey, who would find himself in the middle of a Chicago community that was fertile with opportunities.

Dorsey recognized that at every corner sat either a blues spot, a jazz club, or a church. Submitting to ...

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December 17, 2021 2 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

As the US economy began to boom after World War II, so did the demand for alternate means of transportation. While personal car usage rose and the highway system was created, many Black people relied heavily on public transit as their primary mode of transportation day-to-day.

Jim Crow’s separate but equal not only impacted restaurants and schools, but it also led to the segrega...

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December 10, 2021 3 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

In 2019, researchers were able to properly authenticate the last known slave ship to enter the United States illegally. That ship, The Clotida, was found in the Mobile River in Southern Alabama.

A slave trader named Timothy Meaher arranged with a king in an African nation to purchase one hundred slaves and transport them to Alabama. With treacherous conditions and little food, t...

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December 3, 2021 3 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

The lynching of Emmett Till in 1955 became a pivotal point for race relations in the United States. Instead of sitting by silently, his mother, Mamie Till Mobley, opted to utilize the media in a way it had not been used before.

She decided to hold an open casket viewing, welcoming as many people as she could to view her son’s body, including Jet Magazine. With the gruesome image...

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November 19, 2021 3 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

Well before formal legislation was passed, promising freed slaves certain land rights, Black farmers traveled west, exploring, and developing heavily forested land. With tons of experience in their pockets, migrating west made sense and allowed Black farmers and their families a safe place to live and grow.

But like most of America’s history, White settlers began to impose new l...

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November 12, 2021 3 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

The 15th Amendment was a monumental piece of legislation that gave Black men the right to vote. As a result of it, over 2,000 African-American men would be elected to office at various levels of government.

But the amendment became more notable for what it didn’t say, versus what it did. Loopholes in the law allowed for voter suppression tactics to rise, which directly hindered ...

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October 19, 2021 3 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

Black soldiers have been an instrumental part of the armed forces since the Civil War. They put their lives on their line for their country and entered war to protect the very land that didn’t promise to protect them.

Despite experiencing inferior treatment while in combat, Black soldiers took the honor to serve seriously and accepted the call for battle no matter what was at st...

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Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

Transitioning from job to job as a teenager, Oscar Micheaux was able to write a story that was inspired by his experience on a farm. The novel, entitled The Homesteader, was published and later adapted into a silent motion picture. With this project, he became the first black filmmaker to independently produce and direct his own feature films.

Micheaux’s creative contributions d...

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Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

At the turn of the twentieth century, W. E. B. Du Bois curated an exhibit at the Paris Exposition in France entitled “The Exhibit of American Negroes.” The exhibition used photographs to disrupt the negative imagery that was used to depict black Americans at the time.

With over 45 million visiting the exhibit, Du Bois was able to put the dignified black person front and center o...

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December 11, 2020 2 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

The landmark case Brown v. Board of Education declared that racial segregation in public schools was unconstitutional. However, for most black and white families, the decision was met with resistance and a court mandate didn’t mean things were going to change.

Politicians and officials throughout the country found ways to ensure full-on school integration never happened. From pr...

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Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

With the formal ending of slavery in place, many freed black people saw this as an opportunity to start anew. But, for those in the south, things didn’t seem much different. The southern black experience saw more aggression, lynchings and segregation. As a result, the time to move was imminent.

World War I allowed black people to enter the factory workspace as they left the sout...

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November 27, 2020 2 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

The Underground Railroad for many of us symbolizes the journey African slaves went on in the name of freedom. But, contrary to popular belief, the first path wasn’t south to north. Instead, it was north to south.

Spanish Florida was an independent entity and many enslaved Africans in the Carolinas and Georgia knew that if they escaped, they’d be granted asylum, as well as their ...

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November 20, 2020 3 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

As the United States began to expand, the demand for cotton led to an increase of slave trades in the country. Eager to capitalize, slave owners sold slaves into the deep south and west in the name of expanding the economy.

Chained and shackled together, black families were uprooted, disrupted and forced to start again in the name of preparing for white civilization. The domesti...

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November 13, 2020 2 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

In the early 1500s, the transatlantic slave trade commenced. Europeans invaded west and central Africa, capturing free people, enslaving them, and placing them on ships as cargo. Conditions aboard these slave ships were horrendous, and the voyage was long and brutal.

As centuries passed, slave scientists developed ways to maximize the amount of people they could steal, all the w...

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November 6, 2020 3 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

In 1973, DJ Kool Herc set up his turntables and introduced a technique at a South Bronx house party that would change music as many people knew it. His ability to switch from record to record — as well as isolate and repeat music breaks — led to the discovery of the hip hop genre.

From school yards to gatherings, boomboxes housed the exhilarating sound that people couldn’t get e...

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October 30, 2020 4 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

During the 2004 Democratic National Convention, a first-term senator named Barack Obama from Illinois delivered a speech that exuded excitement, charisma and spark. Four years later, he found himself on that same platform as he launched his campaign to become the president of the United States.

The Obama vision was contagious and aspirational, although some considered him a long...

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Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

Marcus Garvey was born in Jamaica and experienced the impacts of colonization at the hands of the British. As a result, he developed a passion for improving race relations and launched a Black Nationalism movement that would seek to elevate black people throughout the world.

In 1914, Garvey created the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA). This revolutionary social mov...

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October 16, 2020 2 min
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

In 1915, D.W. Griffith, released a film that would go down as one of the most disturbing representations of black Americans ever, The Birth of a Nation. Released post-Civil War and Reconstruction Era, the film played on stereotypes abroad.

Griffith ignited a racist agenda and amplified the thoughts many white Americans had about free black people. Using white actors in blackface...

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