The J Word: A Podcast by Journalism Practice

The J Word: A Podcast by Journalism Practice

What is journalism? How can we make it better? What does "better" look like? We talk about some of these questions -- and answer them -- in our discussions with academics and professionals who've published recently in Journalism Practice. We focus on meanings of advancing digital technologies in journalism, social issues and conditions that journalists (need to) cover, and the future of the field. Articles featured in the episodes are temporarily made free access for citizens, journalists, scholars, and students. While the discussions are rooted in research, they are approached to influence practice. The podcast is hosted and produced by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr., a former journalist, Associate Editor at Journalism Practice, and an Associate Professor (Senior Lecturer) in Critical Digital Media Practice at Lancaster University in the U.K. Follow him on Twitter @RobertGutscheJr and the podcast @JournPractice or email us with ideas and feedback at jwordpodcast@gmail.com.

Episodes

November 23, 2021 46 min

Artificial intelligence, “robot journalism,” augmented and virtual realities. Journalism is always looking for the “next thing” in innovation to build audiences, trust, and sustainable futures. A lot of the innovation comes in the form of technology, but there are also adaptations that only humans can make. So, what’s the future for humans in journalism?

Samuel Danzon-Chambaud is a researcher with Dublin City University’s Institute ...

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Journalism sometimes gets a bad rap for its role in marginalizing voices – especially because journalism is supposed to be about tackling power structures. Guests in this episode provide their takes on sourcing the vulnerable and try to flip the script by providing some ways journalism can protect the marginalized and ignored.

Mi Rosie Jahng, Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at Wayne State University in the U.S...

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Journalists use social media to predict – and to respond – to audiences’ interests and needs. But how is this kind of engagement reshaping news and its processes for the future? Can we use our predictive methods of social media use, such as metrics, to also speculate about how journalists can use social media of the future? 

In this episode, Constanza Gajardo León, a Ph.D. candidate at Vrije Universiteit in The Netherlands and coaut...

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Our episodes often discuss marginalization and inequalities as a byproduct of journalism. Today, we try to find some solutions to those issues – naming the missing voices in financial crises, in transgender scenes, and in addressing voices of asylum seekers. 

Danford Zirugo is a doctoral student at Hubbard School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Minnesota in the U.S. His paper, “Negative memory mobilization”...

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We talk a lot about audiences as a way to understand what’s "good" and "bad" journalism in the world. Journalists guess what audiences want. And they try to deliver. But when we dig deeper into the needs of audiences – and the needs of journalism, itself – what contestation and challenges and celebrations do we really find? Today, we discuss the challenges and celebrations of various types of journalism – and variou...

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September 14, 2021 53 min

What are the forces on local news, and how do they operate in a global, digital world with its  influences and changes? This episode discusses the connections between ideologies and practices, interactions, and diversions in understanding normative and social understandings of journalistic complexities in local news. 

Hélder Prior is Professor at Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul in Brazil and speaks to one of the most loca...

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Sports journalism. It’s certainly more than box scores. What does it tell us about the world and our places in it? 

This episode focuses on the role of sports journalism in shaping social interpretations of gender, place, and the meanings of winning, losing, and leaving it all on the field. In this episode, Patrick Ferrucci, Associate Professor and Associate Chair for Graduate Studies in the Department of Journalism at University of...

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News agendas are often seen as how journalist cover a news issue or event. For some, the idea of a news agenda is also related to beliefs that journalistic outlets have a political agenda in how and what they cover. In this episode, we complicate the idea of agendas by looking at the silencing of journalists’ own agendas to question the powerful under the threat of violence in Colombia, how the use of “expert sources” influences a ...

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It might seem strange to celebrate what we have learned from and about journalism during the COVID-19 pandemic, but our guests in this episode take an approach that what we know about journalism, or what we think we know about journalism, has been challenged and changed, as with much of other parts of life, since early 2020. Our guests include Teri Finneman and Rebecca Nee from the U.S. and T.J. Thomson from Australia. We discuss p...

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What have and can journalists learn about successful podcasts, such as Serial? What about how journalists use acronyms and abbreviations? And what do viewers really think about local TV journalists’ mistakes? Today, we focus on scholarship surrounding news presentation, from podcasts to parlance and to seeking pardons for journalistic slip-ups. Our discussion provides insights on cultural meanings and practices that can improve jou...

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Cellphones and citizenship. Today, they go hand in hand. And journalists know it. And journalists are well aware of the things people do with their phones, too – from using them for social media to clicking stills – and that this content is ripe for engaging as and with journalism. Today’s episode features journalists’ use of cell phone footage to share stories about police shootings, the balancing of advocacy journalism and conven...

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Innovation in digital longform journalism, inclusivity and engagement in freedom of information requests and reporting, and balancing entrepreneurship with conventional journalism. We hit these three topics with three world-leading scholars, discussing the dynamics of journalists working in groups, doing digital design, and engaging citizens in accessing and interpreting public records that then contribute to participatory reportin...

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Advancements in consumer digital camera and editing software has made us more visual. Before, we would covet our friends’ fancy Canons and Kodaks strapped around their necks. Now we boast about which version of a new phone we have. A focus on filters, AR, editing, and sharing functions of our phones have replaced our old-school focus on megapixels. We are now all photographers and videographers. But is that a good thing, and what d...

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In this episode, Mohamad Elmasry from the Doha Institute for Graduate Studies in Qatar talks with us about his coauthored piece from Journalism Practice that examines news speculation about suspects in the 2017 Las Vegas mass shooting and the mass shooting that occurred in Orlando, Florida, in 2016.  And from the Department of Media Studies at Stockholm University in Sweden, Maria Nilsson focuses on coverage from a 2017 terrorist a...

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What are the secrets to – and of – today’s social media sourcing? Who are our sources? Are they diversifying because of social media? And, what if our sources spew hate. We cover these questions in this episode by speaking with Claudia Mellado about her work on social media diversification in Chile, Gregory Perreault, who studied journalists that covered white nationalist groups in the U.S., and Manuel Goyanes, who worked on the in...

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February 24, 2021 53 min

What news trends are going to emerge in 2021? What ones matter? Associate Editors of Journalism Practice, Zahera Harb and Jaume Suau, talk about the force of amplified media voices and hate speech, digital trends and technologies in news, and journalistic practices from across the world that have impact across cultures. From challenges with an infodemic to ideological explorations of news storytelling in Spain and in the Arab World...

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One of the ways journalists engage audiences online is also one of the things we hate about the internet – clickbait, headlines that draw us in but that often undersell the story. But is it possible clickbait could actually be a good thing? We connect this discussion to other forms of engagement through tech, including news aggregation and VR to understand the changing roles of editing old and new forms of media. And, in the end, t...

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This episode is NOT about Donald Trump and the 2020 U.S. presidential election. It is, however, about how journalists across the globe cover elections. Here, we ask, "What is it that makes an election cycle in almost each spot we will be talking about today – Norway, the US, and Nigeria – ripe for horse-race attention and serve as a kind of sport?" And, moreover, "What are the challenges journalists face in covering ele...

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How should journalists and scholars think differently about digital journalism? Isn't everything journalism digital today? Professors Steen Steensen (also an Associate Editor of Journalism Practice) and Oscar Westlund (Editor-in-Chief of Digital Journalism) talk through their new open access book, What is Digital Journalism Studies?  Listeners will walk away from this conversation seeing how this new field of study expands noti...

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This episode focuses on how and why journalists leave the field. This is not an episode to shame people who left, or who may, and it is also not one meant to keep people in jobs that might be abusive or harmful, but it is one that takes the reasons people stay or leave seriously. From Mexico, Víctor Hugo Reyna looks at the role of “job control” as an influence in people deciding if the job is right for them, while Halliki Harro-Loi...

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