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June 9, 2024 68 mins
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(00:00):
Dave Navity here, Producer Bill inthe studio, mister Peter Brown. He's
on the road doing video stuff someplaceacross the country, like he does real
pro on that. So anyway,it's Bill and me this morning. Good
morning Bill, Good morning Dave.How are you good? Good to have
you here. I you know,I have been pondering how to honor properly

(00:24):
the eightieth anniversary of D Day.And I wish I was a better student
of history when it comes to WorldWar Two. I understand you know quite
a bit about it. So thisis going to be kind of fun.
But I what I'm gonna do,folks today this first segment is open up
the phones, and if you've gota story about D Day, a family

(00:46):
story, something that speaks about whatyour family went through, or you know,
you're any any anything that would beinteresting that you think we ought to
hear about. I want you tocall in four h two, five,
five, eight, eleven ten.But what I want to do is just
kind of go through some of thespecifics. You know, June sixth,

(01:07):
nineteen forty four. It all startsnow that was fourteen years before I was
born. So I was born innineteen fifty eight, and when I when
I think about you know, Igrew up in kind of la la land,
in the middle class family in theBenson area, and my parents were,
you know, just classy, hardworking folks, and I just had

(01:32):
a normal childhood. And you know, you hear about, you hear about
World War Two, but then youhear about the Korean War and then the
Vietnam War and all those kinds ofthings. But to think that fourteen years
before I was born, there waswhat one hundred and fifty thousand soldiers between
the air land and sea folks.Does that sound about right? Bill?

(01:56):
It sounds about right. And therewere quite a few people there, I
mean soldiers. But what people don'trealize too is it's not just fighting man,
it's also logistics people as well.Great point, you know, that's
a great point. Takes a lotto do, takes a lot to feed,
clothe, train and make sure thatthe army has what it needs in
order to win a war or winany sort of conflict. That's something that

(02:16):
people should remember. They went,they went to five beach heads. I
forget the number of ships. Doyou remember? The num was the one
thing I wanted to get the counton I don't remember the exact count,
but it was definitely it was definitelyin the hundreds. I mean I thought
it was almost in the thousands.Probably was more to one thousands if you
include the landing craft and whatnot.There are lots of lots and lots of

(02:38):
ships. There absolutely eighteen thousand paratroopersand so one of the fascinating things about
all this is the area and navalbombardments failed to knock out the strong defense
points that the Germans had there forwhatever reason. Well, wait before I
get to that, we were runninga whole de koi fake operation that we

(03:02):
were talking the Germans into believing wewere going to come from that area as
opposed to where they actually they did. That was called the first United States
Army Group, Operation Fortitude South orOperation Quicksilver. It was in southeast England,
and George Patten was the general there. Kind of putting it all together.

(03:25):
They had dummy landing craft, dummyvehicles, all kinds of fake radio
traffic going on, and the doubleagents were doing their jobs putting out all
the fake information. What were yousaying about Hollywood? And Yeah, at
that time when a lot of peoplemay not know about that operation was there
was a lot of people from Hollywoodin the nineteen thirties and forties who were

(03:47):
also in the service, but theywere also credited with making sure that they
made decoy tanks made out of likerubber air balloons, making sure that they
came up with ideas for fake radiotransmission that actually sounded like real transmissions in
German No less, definitely. Youknow, there was a lot of British
There was a lot of British intelligencethat was working with those same people to

(04:09):
make sure that this operation went withoutany sort of hitch. So that's something
that a lot of people may notknow, but it was one of the
key successes of D Day and ofthe Normandy landings to make sure that they
pulled enough forces away, namely theSS Panzer divisions that were stationed near the
Potti Kalay that we're going to gointo Normandy, but Hitler decided to keep
them there because he thought the realinvasion was coming from the Potti Kalay and

(04:31):
from that southeast coast of England insteadof from the Normandy beaches. So so
had that group moved to where theywere, there's no way we would have
been able to break through well withthe Panser group would have been down there
with what ifs, I mean,you never know, but it would have
definitely been a lot harder for ourtroops to break through, especially when you

(04:55):
have panther tanks and tiger tanks andPanser force coming down that way. You
have to remember that while tanks werevery good at what they did, it
was very hard for those tanks toget off the beaches because the tracks and
would get stuck in the sand.They actually made a couple of what they
call Donald Duck tanks that they wouldhave rubber skirting on the tank's sides on

(05:15):
the hull. Well. Unfortunately,some of those failed and a lot of
those tanks didn't make it to shore. As soon as they came right off
the landing craft. Most of thosetanks sank right to the bottom, and
sadly those crews lost their lives.Oh, for goodness sakes, I didn't
know that, so I guess therewas thirteen thousand bombs Drommed dropped by plane

(05:35):
that missed their targets. Thirteen thousandbombs and four hundred and twenty six men
died to push the to push theGermans East On one day, twenty five
hundred died on Omaha Beach. Youthink about that when I when I look

(06:01):
at this, it took till Augusttwenty fifth before we were able to liberate
Paris, so a little over sixtydays. Yep, took quite a while.
And I just you know, Ikeep in my mind, I keep
trying to think, what is that? What does a person like Hitler?
How does a person that runs onecountry in the world think that that one

(06:29):
country can defeat the rest of theworld. What is it that makes a
guy think that? I mean,just when you think about natural resources,
manufacturing, just the bodies that ittakes, like you're talking about logistics.
How does a guy like Hitler thinkhe can take on the whole stinking world.
Well, that's something that's a questionthey've been asking since the time of
antiquity. Why did Napoleon think hecould take over the world. Why did

(06:54):
the Japanese army think they could takeover the world? Why did you know
throughout history? Why did the monkJoleans think they could take over the world?
Pride, arrogance, military acumen,which definitely played a part in those
times, self deception, self deception. Did I mention ego? That's another
one. But here's the thing,it's because of that belief. And this

(07:16):
is something that people don't like tothink about, is a lot of it
was because they could and they hadthat belief in themselves do it. Do
it, as misguided and as badas they were. But what they never
count on, and what Hitler didnot count on was a lot of people,
including those right here in the UnitedStates and Great Britain and Poland and
other places, that were going tostand up to him. And then eventually,

(07:40):
just like a lot of other militaryconflicts in history, they overextend themselves
and then I mean, that's myI guess that's my point. Now you
think about China, for example,how densely populated China is, but their
populations getting older and older and older, and they don't have the young coming
in behind him. That could beyou know, they might right now have

(08:03):
be at the peak of what they'vegot for a military fighting force. Their
one child policy has come back asthe chickens come home to roost for them.
Yeah, So do they think theycould take on the world. I
you know, they might be arrogantenough to it. I don't think Putin
wants to take on the world,and I don't think he even remotely expects

(08:26):
a country his size of population andthe economic resources they have, they can't
possibly think they could even succeed atsomething like that. Well, I think
Ukraine has been a humbling for Russiaas a whole and especially for Vladimir Putin.
But now he's so far deep inthe Ukrainian conflict. If he were
to basically quit right now, wellhe probably wouldn't be living very long.

(08:48):
Well, most of the generals thatI listened to that I respect say the
war is already won, and Putinis just running the long game on this
and to make sure he doesn't destroyinfrastructure and those sorts of things, because
he's going to end up being therein the parts that he's taken over.
But I don't know. If yousaw Biden. You know he's over there

(09:15):
commemorating the eightieth anniversary, and firstthing he does out of his mouth is
he starts lipping off about Vladimir Putinbeing a tyrant and we've got to save
democracy. He says, we gotto save democracy, and he forgets to
mention that the Soviet Union was ahuge part of the Ally force with the

(09:37):
Axis powers and totally, you know, disrespected the fact that the Russians came
in and saved us on the eastside. But he jumps right to Ukraine
has been invaded by a tyrant benton domination. He said the Ukrainians had
inflicted staggering losses on Russia, addingnearly one million people I've left Russia because

(10:01):
they can no longer see a futurein Russia. We will now walk away
because if we do, it willnot end there. All of Europe will
be threatened to surrender to bullies,to bow down the dictators as simply unthinkable.
So Biden's taking advantage of using thisD Day speech to poke Putin in

(10:26):
the eye and disrespect the fact thatthe Russians were one of the key reasons
why we won that. So I'mgoing to take a break right now.
When we come back, I wantto talk a little bit about how how
this is playing out from a politicalstandpoint. But I'd like to I'd like
to if you have a D Daystory of some type, I'd like you

(10:48):
to give me a call four htwo, five, five, eight,
eleven ten and share something personal that'simportant. I think you know, this
is something I do think we reallydo need to respect an honor. Today.
We'll be right back. Welcome everybodyback to eleven ten kfab Dave n
Abney here, so you know wehave D day. Biden goes over there

(11:11):
to give a commemorative speech. Firstthing he starts doing is shooting his mouth
off about how terrible Russia he iswhen he could have shown some respect to
him for what they did to helpus win World War Two, and the
you know it gets me going.You guys have heard me go off on
this a little bit more. Butthe chances are that the pipeline that got

(11:37):
blown up to prevent the patrol humor natural gas or whatever it was it
was coming through the pipeline from gettingto Europe, chances are pretty good we
did it. We blew the pipelineup. I can't imagine anybody else doing
it. And the Ukraine and certainlydid not have the navy and the talent

(12:05):
the Navy type seals that could godown that far and blow up a pipeline.
So our fingerprints are most likely onblowing up the pipeline. Then we
provide missiles and we tell the Ukraineit's okay to shoot them off inside of
Russia. And then you look atevery time we turn around, we're poking

(12:28):
Putin in the eye, talking aboutwhat an evil dictator he is and how
he's going to try to conquer theworld. And then you add to the
fact that Biden says we got tosave democracy when you see how the Biden

(12:52):
administration and the Justice Department combine tosue Trump and then manipulate courts, manipulate
judges, do all that stuff tohave thirty four verdicts of guilty against a
political opponent. What do you supposeVladimir Putin is thinking when he's sitting over

(13:13):
there watching this kangaroo court activity goingon. And then Biden has the nerve
to say we have to save democracywhen he's actually destroyed it in the United
States of America. What do youthink of my opinion? Hey, My
point is he's provoking, provoking,provoking, provoking every time you turn around.

(13:35):
If we didn't have the corruption overthere in the Ukraine, that the
Bidens have their fingerprints on, andthen if Biden hadn't let NATO creep in
on the Ukrainian territory, at whichPutin said, over and over again.
Don't you bring NATO on my doorstep. Don't you bring NATO on my doorstep.
And then the Ukrainians were persecuting theRussian speaking people on the eastern part

(13:56):
of the country and they were beggingPutin to come in and save them.
And so now you got all ofthat going on, that's be being completely
overlooked. And then we're spending allthis money. I believe the Russians have
won this war a long time ago, and they're just playing the slow game.
We're throwing money, bad, good, money after bad. We're allowing

(14:18):
them to go in and blow upparts inside of Russia with our equipment,
which means that our people are trainingthem on how to use it. And
then he shoots his mouth off atD Day. To me, Biden is
so stupid. He's provoking Pooting intodoing things that maybe otherwise wouldn't do.
What do you think about that?Four h two five, five, eight

(14:41):
eleven ten. Let's go to Genie. Genie's got a thought on D Day.
Welcome to the show, Jeanie,Hello, good morning, good morning.
I enjoy your program, and thisis a very special time for me.
My brother was a scout in thecavalry and he was in D Day

(15:09):
And what I remember most is mymother sitting on the porch swing crying because
she was so afraid she would loseher sing. Luckily he didn't come home,

(15:35):
but he never talked about those years. No Caro Pat was his general.
Wow, Hey, Geenie, canyou please turn your radio down behind
you? Because it's sure that's comingin behind us and it's delayed a little
bit. So there we go.Yeah, that's a whole lot better.

(16:00):
So your brother, how old doyou suppose he was when he was over
there? He was twenty years old? And how old were you at the
time? Probably ten? How oldare you now? How old are you
now? Ninety? Oh, I'mso blessed you called. You know that,

(16:22):
I really am. So. Whenhe came home, he couldn't speak
about what he witnessed, basically thatpride, and he wouldn't talk about it.
There was one experience that he didhave there was they were packing up

(16:45):
German show soldiers and putting them onup on trains and this German also sir,
came up to Jerry and ask himif he would take his dog so

(17:10):
nothing would happen. Feeling so Jerrytook the dog and kept him while he
was over in France, and that'ssomething. We have a picture of him

(17:33):
and his dog, and we're justthankful that he got to come home.
No kidding. Wow, I sureappreciate you calling. Thank you. I'm
glad you're a regular listener of theshow. Oh I am all right.
Good. Well, I'm glad youdon't turn me off when I come on,

(17:55):
So I appreciate it. No,I wouldn't do that, Okay.
I bless you, my love youbet bye bye. You know the one
thing too that kind of gets overlooked. And by the way, if you
have if you got a story orsomething four oh two, five, five,
eight eleven ten, you think aboutthe humanity of people on both sides

(18:17):
of that conflict. You got ayou got a group of people up at
the top that get power and controland then they start driving the agenda,
and then the people down below justgot to go along with it. And
here it is a she's talking abouta German shoulder soldier that you know,
cared so much about his dog.Did he wanted to make sure nothing happened
to his dog? Bill? Isuppose you you know, story after story

(18:38):
of those sorts of things. Wherewasn't there even a time where there was
a ceasefire where the soldiers uh kindof coordinated together a minute? Where was
that? Where's that story? Themost famous instance of soldier fratnization was during
the First World War, during theChristmas Truth between the British and between the

(18:59):
British French. No, actually itwas just a British excuse me, the
British and the German armies during WorldWar One. As far as truce is
and as frantization, I mean,I don't know of any off the time.
Maybe that's what I'm thinking of.It's probably World War One. We're
probably what you're thinking of. Yeah, And I don't know if I saw
that in the movies or what,but it it was. It just showed

(19:19):
you how people on both sides ofthe conflicts are human and and it's it's
important to think about that as wego four oh two, five, five,
eight eleven. We got a littlebit more time. But my,
my, big, my big concernis you got a guy like Biden who

(19:41):
just pulls out of Afghanistan, immediatelyleaves all this equipment there. The rest
of the world leaders are looking himlike, like, you idiot, what
kind of an idiot are you thatyou would do something that's stupid? And
then he allows our borders to becompletely old, and so our nation isn't
going to be a sovereign nation anymore. We're going to be controlled and taken

(20:03):
over by these other these other peoplegroups. And then he's putting more and
more money into the Ukraine. AndI think the reason he's doing it is
because the Ukrainians. The Ukrainians haveall kinds of goods on Hunter and Biden

(20:25):
himself that if it came out,he would not only get impeached, but
maybe thrown in jail, So thathe's trying to protect being caught because of
all the corruption that they did throughthe Ukraine with the Ukrainians, even to
the point where the CIA used themto spy on Trump. And of course

(20:45):
we're going to protect democracy with theBidens. Well, anyway, I'm worried
that they're he's going to provoke Putinfrom getting into the war. All right,
let's go to Kevin. Kevin,thanks so much for calling the show.
Thanks a lot. I appreciate theprogram this morning. My dad served
in World War Two as a staffsergeant out of the Iowa National Guard,

(21:08):
was sent down six months before PearlHarbor to Camp Poke Louisiana to playing with
Patten and the Third Army, andwas sent over to England and then on
into the Battle of the Balls.And at the end of the Battle of
the Balls and he did reconnaissance work. He was, you know, in

(21:30):
the armored division of Patten's Third Army. But he did the constance work for
Patten. But at the end ofthe war he was sent in and his
group was sent into Mouta Housen concentrationcamp to free the prisoners. And he
has many, many pictures. Eisenhowertold all those soldiers to take as many

(21:52):
pictures as you can so that theworld will never forget what you've gone through
and have experienced, and modhaus andconcentration camps. There were something like it's
up in my head. I'm thinkingthree and forty five thousand prisoners who were
executed by the Nazis and their boxcars are dead Jews, you know,

(22:17):
from bottom to top. And thisis something we should never forget. Remember
for our own country and apply toprinciples so that we never fall into what
Nazi Germany fell. Well, theincompetence and ego and lust for power drives
all this stuff. And I'm afraidthe bidens are right on the precipice of

(22:41):
all of that. But Kevin,thank you for calling. We got to
take a break. Eric, stayon the line. I'll make sure I
get to you when we come backfrom the break. Anybody else have any
thoughts about all this, please feelfree to call four two five five eight,
eleven ten. We'll be right back. Welcome back, eleven ten,
kfab Dave Namity here. Bill ison the controls this morning. We're talking

(23:02):
about D Day and trying to sowsome respect of what took place there.
I get this. I get thisnotice from a buddy on Facebook says,
in the nineteen forties, males fakedtheir age to fight in World War Two.
In twenty twenty four, males pretendto be females to win in sports

(23:23):
Boy. What a contrast, uh, And let's make sure that we just
pave the way for that sort ofmindset in our own military as well.
All Right, we're taking some callsfrom people that have something to say about
D Day. Let's go to Eric. Eric, thanks for calling the show.

(23:45):
Good morning, morning, Dave,Hey, I don't have a lot
of stories, but I can tellyou that my grandfather, he was a
jeweler in Omaha, and he camehome from work one day and told my
grandmother that's when my mom and myuncle were just a little kids, that
gert I signed up. Her namewas Gertrude gert I signed up, I'm
heading off to the army. Andhe wound up under patent and they were

(24:10):
in France. They got they gotseparated from the rest of the their platoon,
and they were wandering through France andthey were out of rations, and
they came upon a deserted farm andthere was a skinny cow up the pasture,
and and they shot it and madeit because they were so hungry.
But they got reunited with her withtheir group, and he wound up in

(24:33):
the Battle of the Bulge and theirtank was taken out, and he's the
only one that crawled out alive.So he was he was flown out of
there and then wound up back inthe States. But are you are you
telling me you would You wouldn't evenbe on the planet if he didn't survive
that tank attack. That is correct. I've got his uniform and purple heart.

(25:02):
Wow. Well listen, I appreciateyou calling Eric, And did he
have a German? Did he havea German last name? Hosted? That's
what I thought, Yeah, becauseyou told me that, I was wondering
if he was a hosteed or that. Can you imagine in the hosted or
fighting other Germans over there. Yeah. My wife's man name is hosseoffel Oh

(25:26):
and her her dad served in theNavy. So wow, yeah, all
right, Eric, thank you forColin. Let's go to lawson. Lawson,
thanks for calling the show. Goodmorning, Lawson, Good morning.
How are you doing good? Hey, you wanted some stories. Yes,
I'll start with my father. Hewas assigned to the hundred and first.

(25:49):
He was a forward Navy gunfire hofficer. He was assigned to the Nevada
and he went in the day before, the night before, and there is
a monument behind Utah Beach. Hisplane was shot down and he is listed

(26:15):
as chilled in action, which didn'thappen, but he would talk about,
you know, the plane was shotdown and he was the only one.
He was one of five. Hethought the god out alive. He's the
only one he knew that got outalive. But he, uh, you're
telling me. And he was onan airplane that flew in before the night

(26:40):
before, and so he was aparatrooper. They were trying to get him
deep inside the territory. The planegets shot down, he gets out along
with some other people and he survives. So he was the only one that
survived. He's the only one thatsurvived. And then he made his way
to Saint Mary's Deglee, which washis assigned spot, and and actually met

(27:04):
up with his radio operator who wasin the same situation. Uh, And
they were able then to put togethera get the radio together, and then
he was he was bringing in navalgunfire support from the Nevada and he was

(27:27):
actually the first radio contact that theyhad from the inland. Isn't that fascinating?
And he made it home alive.You take a lot of those guys
the v Elkinawa. Oh no kidding, ante, wait a minute, time

(27:53):
out. Now you think about whata champion that guy was, because not
only did he get disoriented when hehad to hop out of the plane,
he catches up with he gets tothe right spot anyway, and then they
do the radio stuff that calls inall the shots. They make it out
to go do something else. That'spretty that's pretty incredible. Yeah, he's

(28:17):
written it down. It's quite astory. And that you keep talking about
what our great president was doing onthe beach in Normandy. If you go
to Normandy and you look at themonuments on the beach, there's nothing about
democracy. It is about freedom.It is about freedom and and and just

(28:40):
to deside, our progressive liberal democracyis what the problem is because they are
a liberal by part of the democracyis tyrannical. And we're in Ukraine claiming

(29:02):
to be supporting democracy, which weare supporting a tyranny that has nothing to
do It has nothing to do withfreedom. Why doesn't Why doesn't Why don't
hold on a second law? Sowhy don't more of our politicians recognize that?
Even Don Bacon and and these guys, they're are all nuts about supporting

(29:26):
them, because if they are progressives, they are not constitutional patriots. They
are all about aggressive dominance. Allright, listen, I appreciate your calling
loss and that was a good report. All right, when we take a
break, I hate to do this, folks, but I got to.

(29:49):
I got to talk about the HunterBiden trial. I know, vomit,
I know, I know, Idon't want to talk about it, but
I feel like i've got to.So I've got some video for you to
listen to that I think is prettygood, and then I'm going to ask
you a big question when that's allsaid and done, so we'll be right

(30:11):
back if you. If you watchthe news, it's just been NonStop Hunter
Biden, this, Hunter Biden,that, this trial, of that trial,
and the what they're trying to gethim on is he had a gun
when he was a drug addict.And I'm looking at that, and I'm

(30:33):
saying, are you kidding me?We're not looking into how he got money
from the Ukrainians, We're not lookinginto how he got money from the Chinese.
We're not looking at at at coordinatingwith Jim and coordinating with his dad
and all the stuff they were doingto manipulate their positions of power to get

(30:56):
money from foreign actors. We're nottalking about that. But we're talking about
him owning a gun when he wasa drug addict. And by the way,
now, the laptop that all theother media organizations talked about is being
a Russia collusion problem, and theyall bragged and carried on like it was

(31:19):
a Russia problem. They're using thatlaptop now in their prosecution as being authentic.
What's the irony of that, folks? Anyway, James Comer, who
is on the House Oversight Committee,he's the chairman there. He was on
Fox News. I want to playa little bit of what he had to

(31:41):
say. So I listened to allthat, folks, and then I think
about, we got this big trialagainst Hunter Biden that he had a gun
when he was a drug addict.Now on a scale of one to ten,
but Comer was talking about to tenthis gun thing. Is it a

(32:07):
three? Is it a four?I mean it's we're we're missing the we're
missing the massive problem that's just underthe water line, and we're looking at
just a little bit that is aboveground. And this is our justice system

(32:27):
in this country today is absolutely patheticand we should all be ashamed of ourselves,
especially when you see what they didto Trump. They made that that
was the big issue and all thisother stuff. Ah, nothing to see
here, all right, We're gonnatake a break. When we come back.
I got a dear friend from Indiathat's going to join us. You're

(32:50):
gonna learn a lot about what it'slike to live in India and the challenges
that they're having. So don't goaway, folks, We'll be right back
after the break. I have aspecial guest in the studio. His name
is David Desapatula. Good morning,David, good morning. Good to have
you on here this morning. Soyou are from Visaka. I can't speak

(33:17):
Indian at all. Visit say thename of your city. It's called Putnam,
Vaishaka Putnam and Putnam in city VaishakaPutnam. Yeah, see, I
can speak Indian. Two point fourmillion people. Yes, okay. You're
with a ministry called Universal Church Ministries, and I'm a part of a national

(33:43):
network of pastors, Harvest Network.And I met your dad, Santos.
Santos is my age. You're HOWLDthirty seven okay, and you're traveling the
United States now, just kind ofconnecting with some of the contacts your dad
had. Then you've got some familyover here. Yes, let's start by

(34:05):
talking about what what your city's like. Now. You know, I asked
you on the way here, doyou have homes like this? And give
everybody your answer. What what yourliving situation is like in terms of the
city, It's like mostly densely populated, and because of that, we have

(34:27):
high rise buildings apartments of five floorsmostly and then each floor may have like
four to ten houses like on eachfloor, and it's density, so there's
ten houses inside the five story Yeah, so it's like the total fifty houses
sometimes in one apartment building and thenyou have several apartments because it is densely

(34:47):
populated and land is expensive, andthen the house that expense you, so
you you virtually have no trees correctin the city is mostly like the land
is expensive, so now people cutshot on trees and we have places where
we have trees, but the parksin the cities, like we have less
trees because the buildings are up.And you basically said it's all concrete.

(35:10):
Yeah, mostly they called concrete citiesbecause everything is concrete, the roads,
the buildings, the pavements and everythingis concrete. And your city's on the
southeast part of India. Yeah,mostly we call it South Indian. But
we're on the east coast of India. So the ocean there is the Indian
Ocean. It should be like beilBengal the other side of the Indian Ocean.

(35:34):
Okay, so i guess the thingthat I wanted that people get a
sense of the Indian people are veryfamily oriented, right, Yes, they
have mostly family. Okay, sowhen I think of family in the United
States, I'm thinking, Okay,I'm gonna go outside and throw the ball
with my kid on my lawn.We're gonna ride bikes in the neighborhood.

(35:55):
We're gonna, you know, goplay baseball football at a park some place,
and all that kind of stuff.How do you do that when you
guys just live on concrete. Wehave places where we can go and play.
And the parents didn't. They donot play with the kids as like
you do here. But the parentsdon't play with the kids. Yeah,

(36:16):
yeah, adult kids because the parentsare busy and the kids are busy.
The kids may play with the otherfriends they have, and they have occasions
where they go out for picnics ormaybe to a tourist sports with the family,
but most of the time they're insidebuildings. Yeah, for most of
the party inside the house. Andis that because of the heat because it

(36:37):
gets so hot outside. It's alsobecause of that. And then they mostly
come out of the evenings because whenthe temperate is down and then everybody's coming
home, so that's when they goout of the house. How bad does
it get in the summertime? Hot? Why heat? In terms of celsius,
I should like go like forty five. And in terms of you faaradheit,
it should be like one ten.You get to one ten, one

(37:00):
ten in terms of mostly in summer. So now summers ended in India,
like this week we have we're havingrains, so it goes unto one ten
the heat because we have a heatwave that comes and think about think about
bill, take about one ten andall that concrete. That's a lot of
heat for me. And then sometimeswe have people die because of the sun's

(37:22):
stroke because people go out for workand they find some people work outside houses
and all those things. So yougot people have to repair, right contractors,
construction people. Yeah, so andthey they get the heat stroke.
And then we have so people dyingbecause of the heat stroke. But the
government advises them to not to goin this heat of the day because to

(37:43):
prevent them. And we have alot of people who volunteerily help giving like
liquids. They are they hand outfluid sometimes or h every party or even
an givos. They have the watersystems outside of the liquid systems outside the
city, so everybody can have afree drink or free How clean is the

(38:05):
city? It should be fifty fifty, Like fifty percent is clean and fifty
it is really bad. Yeah,what's the crime like, uh, it's
it's not much. But how howstrict are the rules as far as if
you get caught stealing or something thatyou do, they throw your right in

(38:27):
prison. Are they tough on crime? Yes, they're very tough on crime.
They have the stat of data andeverything, so they go right in
and then they do that. Dothey chop off heads or arms or limbs
or anything like that. No,India is a merciful country. So no
death penalty as of now. Nodeath penalty. Yeah, even though there's
it's high crime, but still commentshave a mercy. So the government you

(38:50):
said, the government has mercy.Yeah, so even until the terrorists.
So they have then in the jailfor long, but they don't and sometimes
in the government the person thinks heis not guilty, he can apply to
Present of India to come out ofthe prison. So we have to get
a pardon of some type. Okay, So talk to me about you're part

(39:14):
of a ministry that covers nine statesin India. There's ninety churches. Three
states. I'm sorry, yeah,three states. Ninety churches. Yes,
yes, So you've got ninety buildingsbasically that are a part of your ministry,
and you've got nine thousand people betweenall the different organizations that probably attend

(39:35):
on a regular basis. Tell mefrom a religious you're a Christian. From
a religious standpoint, what is thelandscape like between you got Hindus, you
got Muslims, you got Sikhs.Tell me, you know, we got
a lot of people listening here thatdon't have any idea what's going on over

(39:55):
there religiously. What would you say? Yeah, this is a very important
question. And India is religious.Everybody has the fear of God, even
though he's not a everybody's got afear of God. Yeah, even though
he says I'm atheist, but stillhe has fear of God. That's the
culture of India. And then theyhave the fear of that and most of

(40:16):
the people are really they might bereligious in terms of religious but they have
fear that God is listening and Godis seeing that. And then they didn't
offend people like bad motives. Soeverybody's afraid of God. That's so.
But you're saying everybody, whether you'reHindu or you're afraid of God of God

(40:37):
or the people. Like in theBible, you see there is a judge
who is he doesn't he doesn't afraidGod and is not afraid of the people.
And but India we have people thatare afraid of the people. They're
afraid of the people and God ofGod. Because we have the concept of
karma. I think, yeah,what's karma? What is that? It's
like, if you do something bad, it comes back to you. If

(40:59):
you do something good, it comesback to you. So whether you're what,
no matter what religion is, youjust have this the sense of there
you're going to be accountable. Ifyou do something bad, it's going to
come back to So the people whenmost the judge they judge someone, they
say that, oh the koma hitback him because he did something before that,
and then that's what is hitting back. So it is like the Bible,

(41:21):
you see when you reap, yousaw it, you reap what you
saw. Yeah, yeah, sothat's what the concept of that. That's
the basic thing. So most okay, but I okay, but I'm told
that the Hindu are especially aggressive atpersecuting Christians. Yeah, now it is
the point like that. So wehave some some states in India they're trying

(41:44):
to bring something called anti conversion laws, anti conversion laws, so it's basically
targeting Christians. But they say inthe sufficient level that it's for every religion,
so you cannot bring someone forcefully intoit forceful any other religion. Like
okay, but you were saying,you were saying that in a particular family,

(42:06):
if somebody, if the family isHindu, and then some one person
in that Hindu family decides to becomea Christian, that Hindu family can be
really tough on the person that decidesto become a Christian. Is that dirrect?
Yes? Yes, what do theydo? What's the the highest thing
should be? Like they may sendthem in from the house, they send

(42:27):
them away. Yeah, they wantto break relationship with his son or daughter,
a spouse ab it. Maybe sothey don't want them to Part of
that is there does a government doesit? Does the Hindus in government ever
go on the rampage of going afterpeople that aren't Hindu? Or are the
Muslims going after the Hindus, sothat you know, you got this this

(42:51):
political and physical battle going on.We have certain things, but we don't
see leaders Drey doing that. Butthe leaders aren't actually doing yeah, you
cannot see them doing that because theywant to show a good picture of them,
so they hide things from the public. So but they may do it
in like intensify some other people todo that. So it's all under yeah,

(43:14):
under the carpet, kind of yeah, under the carpet. And they
they they act like they're just nice, respective inclusive leader, but behind the
scenes they are orchestrating all sorts ofmischiefs. So they have power, they
have money, and they have thecontrol of the the police and everything.

(43:35):
So they try to bring their pressureon the people who are like like low
people who don't have any support anythinglike that, so they can force on
those people to do certain things orbring that upon the people. So the
Christians effort in some areas because thegovernment is also involved in those things.

(43:55):
So you don't see this on thenews outside, but if you go and
talk to people, you see thatthey want to protect those people. They
want to protect the own Hindu groupsor they want to because now we have
a Hindu Party, and they havetheir own agenda of making the country a
Hindu country. Because we've seen alot of leaders, like even the top

(44:19):
leaders from the party have said thatwe want to bring back the Hindu principles,
we want to bring back all thosethings. We're going to take a
break. When we come back,we'll pick up more on this with David
Desha Patula from India. We'll beright back. Before we went to the
break, we were talking about whatpercentage of India's Hindu. Yeah, it
says eighty percent is Hindu? Eightypercent? Yeah, what percentage is Muslim?

(44:43):
Should be like five five percent?Yeah, Okay, Now the Hindu
faith, what are the basics ofthe Hindu faith? It's mostly the life,
the principles of a life, andthen it was added the religious religion
was addedly to so it was basicallya fundamentals of living first and then really

(45:07):
now I'm told they believe in likea thousand different gods. Yeah, yeah,
so it's little history into that.So India is basically like thousands and
thousands of groups ethnic groups, uh, and each group has their own like
god and language, religion and allthis stuff. And if you could see
clearly if you could see that,it's like a copy of a similar to

(45:30):
Egyptian gods, as similar to Kidnetgod, similar to Iranian like gods.
But there one of the things Isaw was like an image of an elephant,
I guess, or something like thatwith a woman with eight different hands
and stuff like that. Yeah.Yeah. So basically it's like India has

(45:51):
all kinds of gods because it's fromall over the world, and so now
they have to live together in harmony. That's why you have many gods.
But every religion, every person mayhave two gods. One should be like
his own god, like you seein the Bible. Like you see Jacob's
father in law has god father inlaw. Yeah, so was that Laban,

(46:15):
Yeah yeah, or Laban in English? So he has family gods,
so something like that. Each inthe house they have his own family god,
and the second should be like thegod he likes. Because they are
millions of gods, he can he'llpick that one or one maybe a God
of strength or God of destruction,something like that. So because of this,
they say that they have like thirtythree million male gods and thirty three

(46:37):
million female gods. Thirty three millionmale gods and thirty three million female gods.
Yeah, the women pick the femalegods and the men pick the male
gods. Not regret, but likelike I said, like every family has
their own family god, and thenthey can they have something called a wishful
God, whatever god they like it. It may be they are like three

(47:00):
or four popular gods in India,and so they may follow one of them,
like maybe a rain god or maybea harvest god. So what makes
what makes a person you run aChristian ministry? What makes a person exit
the Hindu way of thinking to becomethe Christian way of thinking? What is
a Is there a common theme there? The things back comes back to basics

(47:24):
again, like when Jesus said,like you will perform miracles, healings in
my name. So the context ofIndia's You've got millions of gods and one
more god like Jesus is not abig deal to them because they can add
one more god to that. Ifyou say Jesus God, they will accept
that because yeah, oh yeah,okay, he's a god. Yeah bring

(47:45):
them in. One more God isnot a big deal to them, So
they will just add a at alike frame of his photo in his house.
Because houses you have a lot ofimages of inside the house, you
can see images of Yeah, allthe gods. They was pictures all across
the walls, the walls and onemore god like Jesus. It is not
a big deal to them. Butwe can have a talk to them.

(48:07):
But initially we had to begin thetrust. They had to trust us.
So we build a trust with thembasically to know them and then we try
to share our own testimonies when timecomes in. So the way you your
way, you're building trust. Youhave institutes to teach women over there how
to sew yes, right, wehave a social service responsibility, so we

(48:30):
have a women program where we teachwomen how to stitch the clothes. So
we have the basics from basics advancesa six months program. So they can
go in the factories then and makemoney working for places doing clothes. Yeah,
or else they can start their ownbusiness in the house switching clothes for
the people who wants them. Orare you involved in it at all?

(48:52):
I mean every time I turn around, I hear about something in it happening
in India. I have a degreein it, but I'm into the full
time ministry. Yeah, so yeah, but what about the growth of IT
in India. It's getting bigger.People are mostly into it, and well
American companies are off. They're they'resubbing out IT to India all the time,

(49:15):
aren't they. They called India isnow the IT c IT capital of
the world. So India and youwere saying they're building big buildings over there
to house people to do it.Correct, Yes, So now some of
the few cities now they're trying togo into every city to have the I
T like offices. Now mostly it'sin the cities now like t we call

(49:35):
something like Taiwan, tai To TiOcities. So most of the cities now
have the big companies. But nowthey also want to go into tire To
and tire three cities also to havethe more IT people to. So it's
it's a big IT is coming upand technologies changing off in India and that's
good for India. So you're doingjob training for people. You've got a

(49:55):
college there where you're giving degrees topeople for studying the Bible that sort of
thing. Yes, we have.I have a Bible school, Bible school
we call it's called Bible College inIndia. But it's for adults who want
to go into ministry, maybe parttime of the full time. So it's
we have that program. Also,are you really you still didn't really answer

(50:17):
the question, what is the themoment in time or somebody after learning of
what you teach them in the Bibleversus being a part of the Hindu system
that has all these gods. Whatis it that like the light bulb goes
on, it's like, aha,yes, I can see the difference.
What is that? So it takesa time mostly, but it boils down.

(50:40):
You don't overwhelm them right away withall kinds of information you just take.
It's not good to give all theChristian words or Christian at that starting
moment. So we build trust bypraying with them. Uh. And it's
they come to church or we goto them in the name of miracles and
he they hear about Jesus because ofhearings and whatever, they hear what they

(51:06):
want. So in India, willyou have healings and miracles going on over
there? Yes? In the church, yes, So we remind every week
to the people that God is stillworking today. Well only that like what
would be an example of a healingor a miracle, like someone's is on
a dead bed and they want healing, so we pray for them and they

(51:28):
get healed. God open and theycome back that. Yeah, so it
takes time because they're they're in thisbecause I told Hinduism is not something religious.
Mostly it's like the way of thelife. So for them to come
out of that, it takes along time. So most of the people
they come to churches or to thepastor, and we go to them because
they want they want some miracle intheir life, maybe a physical healing or

(51:50):
maybe an emotional pain they have,or financial problems maybe like mortagageus or something
like that. So they come tothe church because they heard stories outside the
church that God hears prayers. Andthen they come to the church maybe on
an Easter, on Christmas or anyother day. They want to come to
the church or the mid the pastorand they ask to get prayed. So
when God hears the prayer and Goddoes miracles to them, and that's when

(52:13):
they have the moment like oh thisGod is different, and then it begins.
They begin to have faith in Jesusand we take that and it takes
time for them to know about Jesusand what he really does that And there's
sometime it takes like five to tenyears for them to become Christians. It's
because it's a process, the culture. It's a big culture. Yeah,

(52:35):
I want to become Christian? Youhow to how to go off the family?
That's hard for them. So allright, if somebody wants to learn
about your ministry, how would theydo it in the United States? Would
they go online and do a websiteor what would be if people wanted to
check out what you guys were doingmaybe help you with all the things that
you're doing to serve is it?Do you have a website or anything that's

(52:57):
in English? Not really? Notreally, I guess. So we are
not much into Okay, listen,you're not into the social media stuff.
Okay, Well, if any Iguess, anybody that wants to find you,
if they just find me at mywebsite navity dot com, I can
put them in touch with you.But I to me, that was just
really fascinating to get a sense ofmaybe what you're up against. And the

(53:22):
persecution is all kind of underground,So you got people that will beat up
pastors and those sorts of things.When they're walking on the street. Yeah,
and do the police actually come outand close down churches, Yes,
sometime to do that. If theopponent of the they have power. The

(53:43):
person who is trying to do thatis their power. They want to close
down the churches for some reason,so they may put some false accusation,
make a false accusation and then havepeople come in and yeah, yes they
do that, but later on becauseyou don't have the proofs on the first
day, but the church wins becausethe parides and God opens those to them,

(54:04):
and then they'll find the real reasonand then they could start it's a
nuisance. It's just they do thatto shut down because they have anger on
the churches on the passes because everybody'sbecoming Christians, or they don't want to
see their own family becoming Christians,so they want to put a false acquisition
that the pastor is trying to changeforcefully into Christianity. So if the father

(54:24):
has enough power and influence in thecity, then he can motivate the politicians
and the police to shut down thechurch. You can move with the police
and do that. If the policeis not taking that sense, he can
go and attack the pastor or dosome damage to the church. Okay,
it happens. Thank you for beinghere this morning. All right, when

(54:45):
we come back, I'm going totalk about medical marijuana, and then the
governor's got a new pack to helppeople get elected office. I'm gonna talk
about that. So we'll be backin just a few minutes. I'm Dave
Naberty here on eleventh ten, someguy that I met kind of in just
passing. And what's your name againstScott Scott Todd and Tyler to Tyler,

(55:08):
Scott Scott and uh for my nameis Scott for heees. I do a
radio show on the station from nineto eleven weekday mornings, and this is
Saturday. Bill tries to cut meoff. Apparently this was not anything I
wanted to hear. So, man, I want to I want to talk
to you about something. It's like, it's just kind of come to my

(55:29):
attention and people they they're there,they want signatures on a bat something.
It's it's something about medical marijuana,and I'm just wondering, dude, if
that's a good thing to have anew law in Nebraska that will allow for

(55:52):
allow for marijuana to help heal yourdiseases. I think medical marijuana could help
you with a great variety of things. Dave Abny, there's a ballot initiative
out there. In the paper yesterdaythey're talking about how they need thirty more
signatures. Why in the world dowe need a ballot initiative to promote medical

(56:15):
mary one? All right, now, I'm not the guy who's pushing one
where the tail gives you away,So don't be telling me that did my
man bun fall apart and now it'sa pony tail. Hate it when that
happens. So thanks for having mepop in here. I'm glad you did.

(56:35):
I grabbed him in the hallway,folks, because I don't know that
much about it, but I knowyou can get CBD oil now, and
I know people that have seizures cantake CBD oil and it's supposed to help.
Came why do we need medical marijuana? You said you've heard some Well.
I had a conversation, a good, long, nearly hour long conversation
the other day with Christa Egers.She is not only someone pushing with this
organization called for Nebraskans for Medical Marijuana, but she also has a kid who

(57:00):
doctors say would benefit from being ableto control seizures. When it comes to
medical marijuana. Now, a lotof people think medical marijuana is you go
to some clinic and you say,I've got chronic pain or I've got a
general malaise, and they give youa prescription to be able to smoke marijuana
in some states. That's true.That's why she and those who are really

(57:24):
pushing for the medical aspects of thisare saying, Look, we don't want
a road to recreational marijuana. That'snot why we're doing this now. Certainly
there are no is this going tobe a prescription you can get at Walgreens?
Perhaps? I mean, I don'tknow, is a doctor going to
write you up a slip and sendit to Walgreens and you just get drive

(57:44):
through and get your weed as youdrive through. It's not weed. It's
something like a something you can putunder your tongue or a lotion that you
can use to help with chronic painand things like that. It's not where
you're going to be smoking big fattiesas you pull out of the CVS pharmacy.
What about I could be tell me, yeah, see, here's the

(58:06):
thing everyone talks about is that islike, oh, we just get one
step closer to recreational pod course.Well, look around you, guys.
Every middle school bathroom has got somekid in there with a vape pin with
marijuana in it. You go towhen you go to your concert tomorrow night,
there'll be people there who are smokingor vaping marijuana or taking edibles,

(58:27):
and the equalice just busting people anddragging them out of there. It's essentially
legal. Now again, this isn'tme pushing one way or the other.
I'm just looking at the reality ofthe situation. I'm just trying in my
own mind. You got CBD oil, now what the only thing beyond CBD
oil is something that will get youhigh, And that's why they can't do

(58:52):
that. That's against Okay, SoI've not I'm going to Colorado this summer
for the first time in a longtime. I've not spent a lot of
time in Denver and places like that. But they legalize pot, and I'm
told there are so many people livingon the streets and the place is just
becoming dump And they say that's dueto pot. You do you know anything

(59:13):
about that. We've got a lotof people living on the streets here.
No, I don't have nothing likethose. Well, just because you take
that train from the airport into downtownand you can see it out the train
window when you drive in there,you can see the homelessness. I think
that the reason they have a bigproblem with homelessness in Denver isn't necessarily because
of the marijuana. I think it'sbecause it's so tolerated and almost encouraged there.

(59:37):
They go through the streets, theyhelp people out. They don't try
and get them off the streets orclean up their lives or get them a
job or anything like that. Theyjust like, Oh, we're so glad
you're here, you poor thing.Let's get you everything you need. I'm
worried if they pass this thing thatthe next thing that comes behind it is
these shops are going to be allover the place selling stuff from there already

(59:59):
are well, I know, butthey and they all say they all got
like a pot leaf for that Iago and they say, we got the
stuff that can get you feeling goodand it's not CBD. They talk about
this stuff Delta, and from whatI understand, I've never taken it myself,
but it's pretty much the same reaction. Why do you even need this

(01:00:19):
I don't know. I don't knowI did. That's you know, I
hate to sound like somebody that's oh, it's a doorway. It's a doorway
the evil. But I don't know. I can't get inspired about this one.
But I do suggest you cut thatponytail though it's really kind of unbecoming.
I like it. I'm surprised itdoesn't get caught in the disposal sometimes,

(01:00:47):
you know, sometimes I get tackledby it, Like like Ricky Williams
used to get tackled by his hairor what's his name with the Tennessee Titans.
He's got that long ponytail coming outthe back of his helmet and Derrick
Henry they can tackle him gravity.That's part of the helmet. You can
tackle up someone by their hair.Did you know that? No? I
didn't know that. Okay, well, hey, thanks for lightening me kinda

(01:01:08):
this morning. Yeah. Yeah,I'm glad you came out against marijuana used
as you're going to go out andjust get bombed on beer and from the
rest of the weekend. You know, that's a whole nother story. We'll
talk about that some other time.But hey, thanks so much, appreciate
you. All Right, when wecome back. The governor's got a new
strategy to raise money to help influenceelections, and there's been some gnashing a

(01:01:32):
teeth about it, but I thinkit's a great idea. I'll talk to
you about it when we come back. I mean, I want to talk
about something I think is really important. Nebraska has a legislature that is completely
independent. We've got forty nine individualswho who are not Republican and they're not

(01:01:53):
Democrat when they run for office,although you got some that are very left
winging, left wing leaning, andyou've got people that are right wing leaning,
and then you've got the people thatare in between. When you don't
have political parties with discipline where youhave chairmen and things you have to submit

(01:02:14):
a team with, you're sitting ducksfor the political action committees that want government
to keep growing and government to keepspending money. Whoever thought this independent idea
was a good idea, I thinkmade a big mistake because what it does
is nobody's beholding the following a strategicplan for just the action points of a

(01:02:35):
particular party. So you can kindof go with this bill if you want
to at this time, and gowith that bill and another time if you
want to do that, and it'skind of whatever you kind of feel like
doing at any given time. Sothen people start knocking on your door and
having meetings and ringing your phone.And let's just say, for example,
it's a teachers' union pack and theywant to keep the property to situation the

(01:03:00):
way it is. They want toget the windfall when property values go up
and property tax collections go up.They don't want to be accountable for how
they spend money, and so theystart putting all kinds of pressure on particular
candidates that might be in the middleand so on. So it makes it
very hard to get any reforms made. Now. Reforms come from the governor's

(01:03:25):
office, and in my adult lifetime, going all the way back to Bob
Carey and Ben Nelson and those guys, the only governor that I've seen that
has really made a massive attempt totry to reform government is Jim Pillin.
And what Pillin is recognizing is thepolitical parties in this state are kind of

(01:03:47):
weak right now, and the biggovernment spending organizations assemble and they put big
money behind the candidates they want thatthey know will go in and not embrace
forms. So the Governor's decided toput together a pack that his daughter is
running to raise money to support thecandidates that will follow his agenda. It's

(01:04:11):
called we Are in Nebraska. SarahPillen, not Palin Pillon, his daughter
is the one that is the organizerand treasurer. But the group raised about
two hundred and fifty seven thousand asof May tenth and spent about ninety seven
thousand through the same date on differentparticular particular campaigns. And I think it's

(01:04:38):
a good idea. And I wouldjust tell you, folks, if you
want to see change in reforming Nebraska, sending money to the we Are Nebraska
Pack is I think a really reallygood idea. Bill if you don't mind
while I'm chatting here, if youcould look at what their website is.
I didn't even I should have donethat we Are in Nebraska. And there's

(01:05:00):
some critics out there saying, youknow, putting all this money in the
hands of people that really want tojust do the governor's agenda, it's a
bad idea. Well, I thinkit depends on what he wants to accomplish,
and Pillon wants to reform the sizeof government. He wants to get

(01:05:21):
government smaller. He wants to spendless for pupil. He wants to get
rid of inefficient programs eliminate him.He wants to look at where there's overemployment
and trim down. He wants todo everything he can to reform government.
These political action groups that are supportingbig government will fight him tooth and nail.

(01:05:41):
If you don't have the money tocompete against him, if you don't
have the money to elect the candidatesthat will embrace the governor's agenda, then
your toast you can't get anywhere.And I saw in the World Herald where
they were talking to the Paul Landauand he was saying, look, you
know, this is just an exampleof the Republican Party getting weaker and weaker
and the governor having to step upand do this. If I were the

(01:06:03):
governor, I'd do the exact samething, whether I had a strong party
or not, because the sales fornew ideas and new vision have to come
from the governor's office, and he'sgot to put together the people that can
finance supporting the candidates to compete againstthose that are being funded by the big
government packs and I think it's areally smart idea. Were you able to

(01:06:27):
find that? Oh yeah, I'mnot finding a website, Dave. I
see a lot of articles, okay, but no website, No website that
I can put it in. Putin we are Nebraska, dot org or
dot com and see if anything anythingshows up and be interesting to see if
it's there. Yeah, it mightjust be. It might just be a
pack, but a in a stateour size with a unicameral where there isn't

(01:06:53):
party discipline, this is the onlyway I can see you do it now.
I have I've seen governors take partof their fortunes and put it into
campaigns that attack candidates they don't like, even if they're Republican. And I
got a big problem with that.I think about Reagan's eleventh Commandment that says

(01:07:13):
that THU shall not not say anythingnegative about a fellow Republican. Yeah,
I'm not seeing anything, Dave.No. Okay, Well I suppose that
makes sense. It's it's kind ofa private group. But I wanted to
talk about it because the World Heraldhad a front page yesterday, and you
know there's some that are saying,eh, you know, that's not a
good idea he shouldn't be doing it. No, it's exactly what he should

(01:07:36):
be doing. The governor needs tolead this process. The governor needs to
inspire donors to support it, andthose donors need to support candidates that are
going to brace reform. And unlessyou do this, it's not going to
happen. All right? Should Ileave you with one last pathetic story?

(01:08:00):
Did you see where Miss Maryland USABeauty pageant has crowned its first ever transgender
winder winner. I did not,but go ahead and tell me about it.
And this person, Bailey and Kennedy, she took the top prize and
she's going to go on and competein the Miss USA competition August fourth in
Los Angeles. Why don't they justhave their own category? Like in sports,

(01:08:31):
why don't they have their own category? And beauty pageants, why don't
they have their own category
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