The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio ... Show More

Episodes

June 18, 2019 16 min

Deutsche Bank plans to create a new division, a “bad bank”, which will hold tens of billions of euros of assets as part of an overhaul of it is operations. Will the remaining firm become profitable enough to satisfy regulators and investors? And the growing concern in China over balancing the books at a local level. Also, our correspondent takes a trip to Citeco — France’s museum of economics. Patrick Foulis hosts

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June 14, 2019 23 min

Anne McElvoy asks the creator of “Tales of the city” about what drew him back to 28 Barbary Lane and a new batch of tales of queer America. Fifty years on from the Stonewall riots that sparked the LGBT civil rights movement, Armistead Maupin talks about how far there is still to go, what young gay men can never understand about his generation and why he has finally decided to abandon his beloved San Francisco

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June 13, 2019 23 min

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, huge demonstrations in Hong Kong have rattled the territory’s government. (8:50) America’s biggest defence merger highlights the changing nature of war (17:11) And, why Australia’s pioneering image cloaks a nanny state

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June 12, 2019 23 min

The business opportunities from small satellite technology are infinite: from an ‘ambulance’ which rescues malfunctioning spacecraft to devices that can measure the oil level in a tanker from space. Are we on the verge of making gene-editing technology safer? And, 50 years after man set foot on the moon, Oliver Morton, senior editor and author, predicts the future of humans’ relationship with lunar exploration. Kenn Cukier hosts

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A proposed change to the judicial system is just the latest sign that mainland China is exerting pressure on Hong Kong’s autonomy. Authorities seem ready to quell further demonstrations. Although solitary confinement is widely condemned, it’s still common in America; we speak with an inmate who’s spent half a lifetime in solitary. And, the sheikhs of Iraq who help resolve disputes—and are available for hire.

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June 7, 2019 22 min

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the second half of humanity is joining the internet. Citizens of the emerging world will change the web and it will change them. Next, could the slaughter of pro-democracy protesters in Khartoum be Sudan’s Tiananmen? (7:43) And, why baseball reflects America’s desire to be different (14:39)

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Anne McElvoy speaks to two candidates in the race to succeed Theresa May as Conservative leader and Britain's prime minister. She catches up with Rory Stewart, the international development secretary, who proposes a “citizens’ assembly” to solve Brexit. And she asks the foreign secretary, Jeremy Hunt, how he would avoid a no-deal Brexit and about explaining the National Health Service to President Donald Trump

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June 5, 2019 20 min

In this week’s Babbage, Alok Jha investigates the organisations and companies trying to crack a technology that could solve all of the world’s energy problems in a stroke—nuclear fusion. From Iter, the world's largest collaborative fusion experiment, to private start-ups racing to be first, could the long-promised dream of nuclear fusion - to provide clean, limitless, carbon-free power - finally be about to come true?

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Anne McElvoy asks Ursula Burns about how she became the first black woman to run a Fortune 500 company. She explains why she now champions gender quotas, having vehemently opposed them. And, as AI threatens more traditional jobs, how CEOs should balance protecting profits with protecting their employees

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May 30, 2019 26 min

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Britain’s constitutional time-bomb. Brexit is already a political crisis—sooner or later it will become a constitutional one too. How floods and storms in the Midwest are altering American attitudes to climate change (9’24). And, 30 years after the Tiananmen Square massacre, many Chinese know little about the bloodshed (18’07)

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May 29, 2019 19 min

The measles resurgence around the world has been blamed on parents refusing to vaccinate their children but is vaccinating children enough? Also, how a new glove for humans is teaching robots how to feel. And Kenneth Cukier asks Carl Benedikt Frey, economic historian, what can be learnt from the industrial revolution in today’s world of automation and robots.

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May 28, 2019 20 min

The received wisdom is that work is becoming low-paid and precarious, with jobs lost to automation and the gig economy. The data say otherwise. What does the jobs boom in the rich world mean for the global economy? Also, will Alibaba’s plans to list in Hong Kong start a corporate shift away from Wall Street? And, the role of clearing houses in averting financial crises. Philip Coggan hosts

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May 27, 2019 22 min

After the successful stockmarket flotation of Beyond Meat, maker of the Beyond Burger, we assess the potential impact of meat substitutes on global meat consumption. Also, is space tourism about to take off? And what can be done to preserve indigenous languages for future generations. Tom Standage hosts.

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With Theresa May on her way out of 10 Downing Street and Britain no closer to achieving the Brexit she promised, Anne McElvoy takes the long view. She asks Jacob Rees-Mogg, a Conservative MP, and Tristram Hunt, director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, to debate how the titans of the 19th century shaped modern Britain. What would Queen Victoria do? And who in the Conservative party do they tip to take over the leadership?

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May 23, 2019 23 min

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata party has won a second landslide victory. The prime minister, Narendra Modi, should make better use of his latest triumph. Can China, home to half the world’s pigs, curb the epidemic of African swine flu (6’28)? And Brazil faces painful disagreement over how to commemorate its history of slavery (12’... Read more

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May 22, 2019 24 min

Access to the right data can be as valuable in humanitarian crises as water or medical care, but it can also be dangerous. Misused or in the wrong hands, the same information can put already vulnerable people at further risk. Kenneth Cukier hosts this special edition of Babbage examining how humanitarian organisations use data and what they can learn from the profit-making tech industry. This episode was recorded live from Wilton P... Read more

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How will the Trump administration’s restrictions affect Huawei—can the world’s second biggest smartphone maker adapt to not doing business with America? Michael Froman, a former US trade representative and the vice-chairman of MasterCard, discusses how private companies themselves can promote freer trade. And Jennifer Eberhardt, a professor of psychology, on the science of racial bias. Simon Long hosts

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May 17, 2019 23 min

Anne McElvoy asks Cass Sunstein, a former advisor to Barack Obama and co-author of "Nudge", how far the state should define our quest for personal freedom. They discuss how we might need a GPS to navigate through life, the limits of nudging and why left-wing Democrats might be their own worst enemy

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May 16, 2019 23 min

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, as the rivalry between China and the United States grows, surging sanctions create both risks and unexpected business opportunities. Why the feeble Afghan government is losing the war against the Taliban (10’23). And a tale of golden fleeces—why people in Senegal pay a fortune for fancy sheep (20’19)

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May 15, 2019 21 min

Legislators in San Francisco have just voted to ban the use of facial recognition—is this a victory for privacy or a setback for technology? Also, new research on how machine learning can be used to predict the likelihood of breast cancer. And Amazon's boss, Jeff Bezos, draws inspiration from science fiction in his aim to build space habitats. Kenneth Cukier hosts

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