Consider This from NPR

Consider This from NPR

Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of All Things Considered and Kelly McEvers from Embedded help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.... Show More

Episodes

September 25, 2020 13 min
The Kentucky attorney general said this week that police were "justified" in the shooting that killed Breonna Taylor during a botched narcotics raid, and no charges were brought against any officers in her death. The only charges brought were against one officer whose shots went into another apartment. That announcement touched off more protests in Louisville and around the country.

Jamiles Lartey of The Marshall Project exp...
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India is poised to overtake the U.S. as the country with the most COVID-19 cases. This week the Taj Mahal reopened to tourists for the first time in more than six months. NPR correspondent Lauren Frayer reports on how that's not an indication that the pandemic there has subsided.

Across Europe, countries are also seeing cases surge. NPR correspondents Frank Langfitt, Eleanor Beardsley, and Rob Schmitz discuss the rise in cases, ...
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This week Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol. She'll be the first woman in history to do so.

Ginsburg's death sparked record political donations from Democrats, explains Jessica Taylor of Cook Political Report. Those donations may help Democrats in an uphill battle to retake the Senate.

Meanwhile, Senate Republicans appear to have the numbers to fill Ginsburg's seat with a conservative nom...
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Daniel Prude died of asphyxia a week after his brother called 911 on March 23. His death was ruled a homicide. Joe Prude told NPR his brother was having a mental health crisis.

Calls like that make up an estimated 20% of police calls. NPR's Eric Westervelt reports that efforts to reform how police respond — with crisis intervention teams — have fallen short.

And as protests for racial justice have continued, public support for ...
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The coronavirus has killed nearly 200,000 people in America — far more than in any other country, according to Johns Hopkins University. And experts are predicting a new spike of cases this fall.

It's not clear exactly how many of the dead are health care workers, who remain especially vulnerable to the virus. Dr. Claire Rezba has been tracking and documenting their deaths on Twitter.

Christopher Friese with the University of M...
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There have been so many tropical storms this year that the National Hurricane Center has already made it through the alphabet to name the storms. The last storm name started with "W" (there are no X, Y or Z names). Now, storms will be named using the Greek alphabet.

In the last five years, the United States has lost $500 billion because of climate driven weather disasters, including storms and fires. That estimate by the fe...
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During the 2000 Presidential election season, it took 36 days and a Supreme Court decision before George W. Bush became the 43rd president of the United States.

Before that final Supreme Court decision, there was a five-week battle over the ballots, the rules, the laws and the courts. The amount of litigation and lawyers involved has been called "unprecedented." But what was unprecedented two decades ago looks quaint in 2020...
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Breonna Taylor was shot and killed by police in March. Her killing in Louisville, Ky., was part of the fuel for the nationwide protests against police brutality and systemic racism this spring and summer.

On Tuesday, an announcement came that the city of Louisville had reached a $12 million settlement in a civil lawsuit brought against it.

But Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, says this is only the beginning when it comes to gett...
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Wildfires in Western states aren't slowing down and conspiracy theories about who started them are only making things harder for responders.

Conrad Wilson from Oregon Public Broadcasting reports on how claims of Antifa arsonists have clogged up the phone lines for 911 dispatchers in some Oregon towns.

And NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Nick Clegg, Facebook's Vice President of Global Affairs and Communication, about the ...
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If President Trump knew how contagious and potentially deadly the coronavirus was back in February, why didn't he express that to the American public?

That's the question Trump has been facing since last week, when a recording of him expressing a desire to "play down" the virus went public. The audio came from interviews with Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward that he conducted for his latest book, Rage.

In an ...
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More than 3 million acres have burned in California this wildfire season. The previous record in a single season was 1.7 million, two years ago.

Towns are being decimated across California, Oregon and Washington — and firefighting resources are maxed out, as NPR's Kirk Siegler reports from Boise, Idaho.

In California, NPR's Lauren Sommer reports on an effort to fight fire with fire — something some Native American tribes h...
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As trials continue for a coronavirus vaccine, some of the world's biggest drug companies have come together in an unusual way. This week, nine drugmakers released a joint statement pledging to not submit a coronavirus vaccine to the Food and Drug Administration unless it's shown to be safe and effective in large clinical trials.

NPR's Sydney Lupkin reports that the statement comes as a commitment to science, at a time w...
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Youth voter turnout exceeded expectations in 2018 and may do so again in 2020. Generation Z — those born after 1996 — is the most pro-government and anti-Trump generation, according to the Pew Research Center. But Democrats can't count on those voters to be automatic allies.

Gen Z voters in the LA area spoke with NPR host Ailsa Chang ahead of November's election. They discussed today's Democratic party, and why they wil...
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With Labor Day weekend gone, summer is unofficially over — and millions of children head back to school this week, many virtually.

Two teachers — Rosie Reid in California and Lynette Stant in Arizona — share how things are going in their schools so far.

Many states have decided to allow high school football to go forward, even if kids are not in school. NPR's Tom Goldman reports that one coach in Alabama is demanding a coronav...
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California set a new record high this week for the most acres burned in a single wildfire season.

In an average season, 300,000 acres burn. This year more than 2 million acres have been scorched — and the season isn't over yet.

Some communities have taken actions to prevent fires from spreading, but as NPR's Nathan Rott and Lauren Sommer report, those efforts may not be enough.

Fire itself isn't the only threat to peopl...
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Jerome Powell, the chair of the Federal Reserve, told NPR today that keeping people in their houses and 'connected to the economy' will cost money now, but pay dividends later.

But the White House and Congress have been unable to agree on a deal for additional economic relief, millions of people are still unemployed, and many states now have no eviction protection. The Trump administration issued an eviction ban through the...
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As the Northern Hemisphere prepares for a flu season with COVID-19, there are lessons to be learned from the south. Countries like Australia and Argentina made it through the middle of winter with very few cases of the flu. That could be thanks to social distancing measures in place to fight the coronavirus.

NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce reported on flu in the southern hemisphere and the possibility that it could mix with the coro...
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President Trump has stoked tensions and repeatedly failed to condemn acts of violence from racially — and ethnically — motivated attackers, says Elizabeth Neumann, former assistant secretary in the Department of Homeland Security.

Neumann left her job in April and is now speaking publicly about her experience in the administration. She told NPR's Steve Inskeep why she no longer supports the president — and how his rhetoric has ...
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It's September and millions of kids are going back to school this month. Millions more already have. And while some students are beginning the new year in physical classrooms, many are still learning in online classrooms that schools transitioned to when the pandemic began in March.

Remote learning isn't easy for anyone, but it's especially challenging for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other...
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Chadwick Boseman had raw talent, world-class training and the will to defy Hollywood gatekeepers. As a college student at Howard University, he had a helping hand from Denzel Washington. Boseman often spoke about the impact of that contribution and how it helped him chart his own path.

Boseman died on Friday after battling colon cancer for four years. He was 43. Today, we look at what his success reveals about race in America — and ...
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