RadioMD: Body Language
RadioMD: Body Language

Living With Breast Cancer: The Scar Project

April 19, 20139 min
There's no such thing as typical portrait session for photographer David Jay when breast cancer survivors participate in The SCAR Project.There's no such thing as typical portrait session for photographer David Jay when breast cancer survivors participate in The SCAR Project.  Standing before his camera, baring their hearts, souls and . . . scars, where their amputated breasts once were.But why would a woman want to be photographed after a mastectomy, and participate in an exhibit and book? Is there something about going quite public with this highly personal, intimate experience that promotes healing or simply helps women to come to terms with their new reality?David Jay says, I never intended to shoot The SCAR Project. It evolved very organically after my dear friend Paulina was diagnosed with breast cancer. She was 29. Within two weeks she'd had a mastectomy. A beautiful, strong, young woman, I had taken Paulina's picture a hundred times since she was 17. I saw her soon after her surgery and knew I would have to shoot her again. I took her picture because, perhaps as a photographer, taking pictures is my way of confronting, understanding and accepting the things I see.

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