Paul Cook Says The Sex Pistols Squandered A Great Opportunity Twice

By Andrew Magnotta @AndrewMagnotta

November 14, 2022

Photo: Getty Images North America

Sex Pistols drummer Paul Cook says the most disappointing thing for him about his band's brief career was that they never recorded a sophomore album.

While 1977's Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols is still held up as one of the founding documents of the punk movement, Cook tells NME that he's always felt the Pistols had another classic record in them.

"We could have made another great album," Cook said, "even with Glen [Matlock] gone [and] when Sid [Vicious] was in the band and all over the place."

While Bollocks was an instant hit, as FX depicted in the band biopic, Pistol, this past summer, the Sex Pistols' brain trust quickly got distracted by arguments, drug abuse and the other opportunities being famous iconoclasts provided.

By 1978 the Sex Pistols were defunct. Within a year Vicious had died of a heroin overdose.

But despite the tumult of their first go-around, the Sex Pistols got a second lease on life when the surviving members, Cook, Matlock, Steve Jones and John Lydon a.k.a 'Johnny Rotten' reunited in 1996.

Cook says that was the time to make a second album, but they couldn't put the pieces together.

"We did start coming up with some ideas, but John wasn't enthusiastic about it and it didn't come together," he continued. "It's a shame."

He added that they embarked on the reunion at the perfect time, with the band members all in much more stable places in their lives, and the punk scene significantly less volatile.

"But then a lot of old resentments came up between band members along the way, and it deteriorated slowly over the course of a year," Cook recalls. "It wasn't much fun towards the end. Everyone had a sense of humor bypass and it was all a bit uptight. I was glad when all that finished."

Despite the success of the band's miniseries, Cook says there is "absolutely no chance" of another Sex Pistols reunion. Lydon was so opposed to the biopic that he dragged Cook and Jones to court to try and quash it.

While the ruling upheld Jones' and Cook's right to use Sex Pistols music in the show, Cook says it "the last place" he wanted to be.

"It was a horrible experience. I would have preferred to have worked it out down the pub with a couple of pints."

Sex Pistols
Advertise With Us

For You

    Music, radio and podcasts, all free. Listen online or download the iHeart App.

    Connect

    © 2023 iHeartMedia, Inc.