As We Work

As We Work

A podcast about the changing dynamics of the workplace. Every week, we’ll hear from people who are challenging and reevaluating life at work - and talk to experts and Wall Street Journal colleagues about navigating the shifting environment. Hosted by Tess Vigeland.

Episodes

May 17, 2022 31 min

This year’s crop of new college graduates are walking into one of the hottest job markets in generations. Some are demanding big paychecks from their new employers, but money isn’t the only thing on their “must have” list. WSJ reporter Lindsay Ellis brings us conversations with new grads who are prioritizing company culture and work life balance. Jeff Beavers, Michigan State University’s executive director of career services, digs ...

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Having trouble figuring out where to go next in your career journey? The next season of As We Work will take you through all the steps, from getting that first job right out of college all the way to retirement. We’ll talk about the changing expectations from new graduates, the lessons that come from failure, how to network and even how to negotiate at work.


We’d love to hear your questions about how to negotiate a better salary, ...

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Now Hiring: No degree required. A growing number of tech companies are looking to fill roles that require special skills, but not necessarily a college diploma. They’re being called “new collar” jobs. Now, some people who have worked hourly jobs like food service or retail are setting themselves on a new career track and many are getting paid to learn on the job. In this conversation from the WSJ Jobs Summit, Joanna Estanislao deta...

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Experience is usually a plus when looking for a job, but if you’re a more “seasoned” worker, subtle biases could stand in the way of landing the position you want. It’s called ageism: the belief that older employees aren’t as adaptable or desirable. But there are simple ways to position yourself so a hiring manager can see past the dates on your resume and instead see the skills you’ll bring to the job. At the WSJ Jobs Summit, Tess...

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What does it mean to stand up to your employer and demand change? Recently, workers at Disney successfully pushed their CEO to speak out against Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” bill. And they are not the only ones to become activists on the job. Google employee Tanuja Gupta helped organize a walkout that led to a change in company policy, and influenced a federal law banning forced arbitration in sexual misconduct cases at work. She deta...

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How do we make meaningful connections at work when our colleagues are just images on a screen? Lucy Suros, CEO of e-learning company Articulate, says creating virtual hangouts where people don’t work is just one way to build company culture when you don’t have any offices. And workplace and leadership expert David Burkus tells us why maintaining work relationships, even while working remotely, is essential for long-term career gro...

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Addressing and improving mental health has become a workplace touchstone in the past few years. Many employees report feeling anxious, stressed and even burned out. But social psychologist Dr. Amy Cuddy says we are experiencing something more specific to this moment, something she calls “pandemic flux syndrome.” Host Tess Vigeland spoke with Cuddy at the WSJ Health Forum about why feeling powerless is particularly detrimental to me...

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Ford Fund Director Pamela Alexander and former Fifth Third Bank Senior vice president Nicole Johnson-Scales reached similar positions on the corporate ladder. But, like many women in the upper levels of the corporate world, the pandemic made them reevaluate their career goals. Stay on the corporate ladder or step off? Maybe leap to a totally new one? And, as two of a small number of Black women in the top echelons of corporate Amer...

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Salary transparency has become a buzzword, from legislatures to social media, as a way to help improve pay equity in the workplace. But talking about how much we earn is still a no-go for many people. That is partly because the notion that we are “paid what we are worth” is so ingrained in our thinking. Today on the podcast, writer Victoria Walker talks about why she defied the taboo and shared her salary publicly. And sociologist ...

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After 11 years behind the mic at the business and economics show “Marketplace,” Tess Vigeland had reached the top of her game. That’s when she decided to leap. She left her job with no backup plan to travel across Southeast Asia with nothing but a suitcase, a backpack and a camera bag. Tess’ story took place years before the Great Resignation began. As she likes to say, she was a “quitter before quitting was cool.” It’s just one re...

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The pandemic has upended our work lives. Between the Great Resignation, hybrid work and other changes, many of us are reevaluating our relationship to our job. In the inaugural episode of As We Work, host Tess Vigeland sits down with WSJ Life & Work coverage chief Nikki Waller and business reporter Chip Cutter to discuss what is changing and how bosses are managing through it. Plus, WSJ columnist Rachel Feintzeig helps us mind ...

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March 1, 2022 2 min

As We Work is a new podcast from The Wall Street Journal about the changing dynamics of the workplace and how to navigate them. Each week, host Tess Vigeland speaks with experts, WSJ reporters and workers like you. Episode 1 will be available March 8.

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