Everything Hertz

Everything Hertz

A podcast by scientists, for scientists. Methodology, scientific life, and bad language. Co-hosted by Dr. Dan Quintana (University of Oslo) and Dr. James Heathers (Northeastern University) ... Show More

Episodes

Dan and James answer a listener question on how to navigate open science practices, such as preprints and open code repositories, in light of double-blind reviews. Stuff they cover: How common is double-blind review? How many journals don’t accept preprints? Bias in the review process How practical is blinded review? Do the benefits of preprints outweighs not having blinded review? James' approach to getting comments on his pr... Read more

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September 16, 2019 73 min

Dan and James discuss the role of Google Scholar in citation patterns and whether we should limit academics to only publishing two papers a year. Links and details: James has a new Hertz-quarters The Metascience conference (https://www.metascience2019.org) How is google scholar influencing citation patterns A slide from @Jevinwest's presentation (https://twitter.com/gmusser/status/1170466414345375746?s=20) on Google Sc... Read more

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We chat with Kristin Sainani (Stanford University) about a popular statistical method in sports medicine research (magnitude based inference), which has been banned by some journals, but continues to thrive in some pockets of scholarship. We also discuss the role of statistical inference in the current replication crisis. Links and info * What is magnitude based inference and how did Kristin get involved in this? * The response to ... Read more

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August 19, 2019 58 min

Dan and James discuss two listener questions on performing secondary data analysis and the potential for prestige to creep into open science reforms. More info and links: Why generate your own dataset when you can get a high impact paper using public data? Thanks to Stu Murray (https://twitter.com/DrStuartBMurray) for the question Will people steal your ideas? The journal Scientific Data (https://www.nature.com/sdata/) Are we now i... Read more

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We chat with Tom about whether psychology has a conflict-of-interest problem and how to best define such conflicts. Links and other stuff we cover... Tom's article (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02041-5) on conflicts of interest in psychology How can we define a conflict an interest without falling down a rabbit hole? Communication statistics to the layperson How science journalism focuses on single studies rather ... Read more

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July 15, 2019 60 min

Dan and James apply the pomodoro principle by tackling four topics within a strict ten-minute time limit each: James' new error detection tool, academic dress codes, the "back in my day..." defence for QRPs, and p-slacking. Here are links and details... * James won an award * James’ new error detection tool, DEBIT (https://osf.io/pm825/) * Academic dress codes * P-slacking * The p-slacking paper (https://papers.ssrn... Read more

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We chat with Mike Morrison, a former User Experience (UX) designer who quit his tech career to research how we can bring UX design principles to science. We discuss Mike's recently introduced 'better poster' format and why scientists should think carefully about UX. Here's what we cover: What’s the story behind the “better poster?” The Better Poster video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RwJbhkCA58) The Better... Read more

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June 17, 2019 64 min

Dan and James answer a listener question on whether they should stick it out for a few months in a toxic lab to get one more paper or if they should leave. Other stuff they cover: * We don’t like cricket, oh no, we love it (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cewfIUQ6q8o) * James is bad at tribalism * We answer a listener question about a bad lab environment * The “Dutch Bounce” * The Golden Lab Child * Demonstrating independence ... Read more

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We chat with Kevin Mitchell (Trinity College Dublin) about what the field of psychology can learn from genetics research, how our research theories tend to be constrained by our research tools, and his new book, "Innate (https://press.princeton.edu/titles/13255.html)". Other stuff we cover: * Kevin's book, "Innate: How the Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are (https://press.princeton.edu/titles/13255.html)" *... Read more

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We chat with Amy Orben, who applies "multiverse" methodology to combat and expose analytical flexibility in her research area of the impact of digital technologies on psychological wellbeing. We also discuss ReproducibiliTea, an early career researcher-led journal club initiative she co-founded, which helps young researchers create local open science groups. Here are some more details and links: * The tweet (https://twitte... Read more

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By popular demand, Dan and James are kicking it old school and just shooting the breeze. They cover whether scientists should be on Twitter, if Fortnite is ruining our youth, book recommendations, and null oxytocin studies. Stuff they cover and links to obsure references * Should scientists be on twitter? * James runs a Twitter experiment * Scite has now gone live, listen to our episode (https://everythinghertz.com/80) on this plat... Read more

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We answer a listener question on the possible negative consequences of the open science movement—are things moving too quickly? Links and things we discuss in the episode: * We have a new logo, if you haven't already noticed... * Contact us via our website form (https://everythinghertz.com/contact)! * Considering the potential downsides of open science * Here come dat boi meme explination (https://knowyourmeme.com/memes/dat-bo... Read more

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We answer our first audio question, on whether academia is too broken to fix, and a second question on whether we’ve ever worried about the possible repercussions of our public critiques and commentary on academia. Show details: Our first audio question is from Erin Williams (@DrErinWill), who asks whether academia is too broken to fix The letter to the editor that got rejected, despite the publication of the response to the le... Read more

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We chat with Sean Rife, who the co-founder of scite.ai (https://scite.ai), a start-up that combines natural language processing with a network of experts to evaluate the veracity of scientific work. Here's what we cover and links for a few things we mention * What is scite.ai? * The Winnower (https://thewinnower.com) * Why is there no good (and free) plagiarism detector? * Grobid (https://grobid.readthedocs.io/en/latest/Introdu... Read more

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We chat with Henry Drysdale (University of Oxford), co-founder of the COMPare trials project (http://compare-trials.org), which compared clinical trial registrations with reported outcomes in five top medical journals and qualitatively analysed the responses to critical correspondence. Discussion points and links galore: The history behind the COMPare project The two papers that were published: a prospective cohort study (https://... Read more

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In this episde, we chat with Lisa DeBruine (University of Glasgow) about her experience with large-scale collaborative science and how her psychology department made the switch from SPSS to R. Discussion points and links galore: Deborah Apthorp's tweet on having to teach SPSS (https://twitter.com/deborahapthorp/status/1092599860212068352), "because that's what students know" People who are involved with teaching R f... Read more

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February 4, 2019 55 min

Dan and James discuss how to deal with the problem of scientists who start talking about topics outside their area of expertise. They also discuss what they would do differently if they would do their PhDs again Here's what they cover... The podcast will now be permanently archived on Open Science Framework (https://osf.io/zj7y3/) James did a talk at the Sound Education conference on podcasting for early career researchers. Her... Read more

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January 21, 2019 48 min

Peer review is typically conducted behind closed doors. There's been a recent push to make open peer review standard, but what's often left out of these conversations are the potential downsides. To illustrate this, Dan and James discuss a recent instance of open peer review that led to considerable online debate. Here's what they cover... How should we navigate the open review of preprints? Gate keepers gonna gate keep... Read more

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We’re joined by Daniele Marinazzo (University of Ghent) to chat about the recently launched overlay journal Neurons, Behavior, Data analysis and Theory (NBDT), for which he on the Editorial Board. An overlay journal is organised a set of manuscripts that is published and hosted by a seperate entity (in this case, the Arxiv server), a feature that dramatically reduces publication costs. We discuss the unique overlay model, how this... Read more

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December 19, 2018 51 min

In this episode, Dan and James chat with microbiologist Elisabeth Bik about about the detection of problematic images in scientific papers, the state of microbiome research, and making the jump from academia to industry. More info on what they cover: How Elisabeth get into error detection of scientific images The process of detecting errors in images How groups of authors tend to publish multiple papers with problematic images The... Read more

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