For the Record: The 70s

For the Record: The 70s

An audio documentary of 1970s music and history. This podcast examines the intersection of a wide variety of musical genres, including pop, rock, country, country-pop, disco, punk, and soul with the events and people that helped shape the 70s and beyond.

Episodes

September 27, 2021 1 min

The Rumble in the Jungle in 1974 was Muhammad Ali's quest to regain the heavyweight boxing championship he lost when he refused to be drafted into the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. To be sure, it was an important event in sports history but the festival that preceded it, Zaire '74, was every bit as important. B.B. King, Bill Withers, The Pointer Sisters, The Spinners, James Brown, and many others performed in a festival...

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The Seven Essentials project wants to know: What are your choices for the essential rock songs of the 70s? Tell me your Top Two. You can leave a  message in the voice mail link and let me know!

--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amy-lively/message
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The Seven Essentials project needs you! What are your choices for the essential disco songs of the 70s? Tell me your Top Two. You can leave a message in the voice mail link and let me know!

--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amy-lively/message
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The Seven Essentials project needs you! What do you think are the Top Two essential pop hits of the 70s? You can leave a message in the voice mail link and let me know!

--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amy-lively/message
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The latest episode of For the Record: The 70s examines religion in 70s popular music.

--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amy-lively/message
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August 1, 2021 1 min

Tune in for a brief preview of The Spirit of '76: Pop Music on America's Bicentennial. (Hands up if you rocked a Stars and Stripes t-shirt on July 4, 1976!)

--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amy-lively/message
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When FTR70 returns in the first week of August, it will be exclusively on Spotify! Amy explains why this is happening (media companies), how the music featured in the show will change (full songs and playlists!), and asks that you start following the show on Spotify today if you don't already. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amy-lively/message
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Bubblegum music was as beloved by its fans as it was maligned by critics. The 70s saw bubblegum of the 60s, such as "Sugar Sugar" by The Archies, morph into adoration of teen idols such as David Cassidy, Donny Osmond, and The Bay City Rollers. Still, the bubblegum formula worked for other pop hits, too, like "Rock Me Gently." In this episode we makes the case that bubblegum music was as good as any pop music that wa...
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Reggae may not have ever found a significant radio audience in America in the 70s, but its influence on pop and rock music is undeniable. This episode traces the beginning of reggae, borne out of the political strife of late-60s Jamaica, to the first real reggae hit in the U.S. by Blondie in 1981. Bob Marley was not all there was to reggae but he still stands as the most beloved artist of a genre that is both the product of music t...
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January 23, 2021 47 min
Movie soundtracks got better in the 70s as the creation of soundtracks became more intentional. Rather than simply compiling songs for an album and calling it a soundtrack, producers hired artists to create music that offered commentary and enhanced our understanding of characters. Soundtracks ranging from "Super Fly" to "Saturday Night Fever" were as successful if not more so than the movies they supported. --- ...
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The heyday of the TV variety show was, without a doubt, the 70s. It seemed as if every entertainer either had their own show or was on someone else's. While at the time they may have seemed a bit corny, they also seemed to be just what many Americans in the 70s were in the mood for in the wake of assassinations, Watergate, and the war in Vietnam. Looking back at the era, we can also see that these shows give us a glimpse into 7...
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November 9, 2020 43 min
T. Rex, Alice Cooper, David Bowie, and Roxy Music were at the heart of 70s glam rock. This episode examines how glam stretched the boundaries of gender, sexuality, and how rock music was defined. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amy-lively/message
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The Chicano Movement of the 60s and 70s and the growth of the Hispanic population in the U.S. influenced popular culture. Music was no exception. Artists ranging from Santana to Freddy Fender had successful careers in music in an era when Hispanic Americans sought more and better representation in the country's politics and culture. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amy-lively/message
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Heavy metal was outright despised by many rock critics but was much loved by its fans. There is no question that heavy metal is noted for its loud, often aggressive sound and persistent accusations of satanic message followed many of the bands of the Seventies, especially Black Sabbath. Were they really devil worshipers or just creating a brand? Either way, there is little doubt that rebellion, escapism, fantasy fueled heavy metal...
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Why did more women sell country music and get more radio airtime in the 70s than today? Artists such as Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton, and even Olivia Newton-John made country radio friendly music in the midst of the women's rights movement of the 70s. Many of these singers were also able to cross over to pop. The momentum for women in country did not continue. This episode explores the many reasons for country music welcoming wom...
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The shift away from nonviolent civil disobedience to the Black Power Movement in the fight for African American civil rights was reflected in music. Soul music from bands such as the Chi-Lites and the O'Jays took on a more urgent edge, while artists like Isaac Hayes claimed space previously denied to African Americans. Songs like "Mighty Mighty" by Earth Wind and Fire helped proclaim the message that African Americans w...
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The voting age was lowered from 21 to 18 with the 26th Amendment in 1971. Young voters were courted by the music industry, either as attempt to encourage them to register or to vote for specific candidates. This also, indirectly, led to the creation of the late-night music TV show, "Midnight Special," which gave fans a new opportunity to see popular singers. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amy-lively/messa...
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Few people were neutral about progressive rock in the 70s. Bands such as Emerson Lake and Palmer, Yes, and Pink Floyd pushed the debate over the authenticity of rock to the forefront with their classical music-inspired rock. This episode attempts to untangle the debate and shed some light on how the 70s created space for this innovative genre of music. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amy-lively/message
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Songwriters of the 70s were inspired to write not just about the environment, but the places that inspired them. The first Earth Day was on April 22, 1970. In honor of the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, this episode looks at how the world around them served as motivation for songs from artists and bands such as Marvin Gaye, Joni Mitchell, John Denver, The Eagles, and yes, even The Clash. --- Send in a voice message: https://anch...
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The 70s was a tumultuous time for labor. In 1970, even postal workers went on strike. Music of the 70s reflected how workers felt about unions, jobs, and the struggle to get ahead. Not confined to one genre, rockers such as Bob Seger and Tom Petty, country artists such as Johnny Paycheck and Dolly Parton, and disco stars including the Bee Gees and Rose Royce all had hits about working in the 70s. --- Send in a voice message: htt...
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