The Measure of Everyday Life

The Measure of Everyday Life

The Measure of Everyday Life is a weekly public radio program featuring researchers, practitioners, and professionals discussing their work to improve the human condition. Independent Weekly has called the show ‘unexpected’ and ‘diverse’ and notes that the show ‘brings big questions to radio.' Episodes air weekly in the Raleigh-Durham, NC, media market (and also are streamed internationally through WNCU) and are available online the Wednesday following the original airing. WNCU produces the show with major underwriting from the nonprofit RTI International. Have thoughts on what we are doing? Let your voice be heard by rating us and joining the conversation on Twitter by following @MeasureRadio. For more information, see www.measureradio.net.

Episodes

April 7, 2021

In many U.S. families, chores tend to fall on the shoulders of parents – and sometimes one parent – while children don’t contribute as much as a parent might like. Family life is not exactly the same around the world, however. In this episode, we talk with Lucia Alcala, a faculty member at California State University, Fullerton, who has studied cultural differences in family life.

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For people who have the resources to participate, an important portion of life now is spent online on the Internet. Some of those online activities now include political expression and political behavior. On this episode, we talk with Deen Freelon of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill about what we know about online activism in its various forms.

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March 17, 2021

Many of us have had opportunities to cry in recent months. Why do we shed tears at all, though? Why do people cry? On this episode, we talk with clinical psychologist Lauren Bylsma of the University of Pittsburgh about a common experience that we don't yet fully understand.

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What if helping people with their rent could affect the COVID-19 pandemic? On this episode, we talk with Christopher Timmins, Kay Jowers, and Annabel Hu of Duke University about a new paper for the National Bureau of Economic Research.

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Many of us have faced challenges during this past year as the world has coped with a pandemic. What do we know about how families cope and adapt in such situations? On this episode, we talk with Alyssa Witting of Brigham Young University about families in the midst of mass trauma.

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February 17, 2021

We have been talking a lot about hope during these challenging days. What do we know about how hope actually operates? On this episode, we talk with psychologist Christian Waugh of Wake Forest University about the effects of anticipation on our lives.

 

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February 3, 2021

Despite pandemic complications, many people still have opportunities to look for roommates. The idea of living with a stranger offers metaphors for the larger processes of building communities and societies. What can we learn about the choices people in making in selecting roommates and the biases that people harbor? On this episode, we talk with Raj Ghosal of Elon University about his work on this topic.

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January 20, 2021

The conveniences afforded by digital technology companies as we buy products and connect with others online in recent years are quite remarkable relative to the past. What might the costs for society be, though?

On this episode, we talk with Scott Timcke, author of Algorithms and the End of Politics: How Technology Shapes 21st-Century American Life for Bristol University Press.

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Popular music both inspires and signals change. What can music lyrics tell us about shifts in popular culture? On this episode, we talk with Alex Kresovich, who has worked both as a RIAA-Platinum certified and Billboard #1 music producer and songwriter and as a researcher. He has assessed references to mental health in 20 years of rap lyrics. 

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The end of 2020 has brought glimmers of hope with news about COVID-19 vaccination clinical trials. Although many of us have heard about clinical trials, you might not know exactly how they work or what they produce. On this episode, we unpack the practice of clinical trials with Michele Andrasik of the University of Washington. 

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Public discourse sometimes refers to abstract ideas without concrete examples. Health care organizations like hospitals sometimes have to describe the community benefits that they offer, for example. What exactly is a community benefit, though? How might we track and explain those benefits? On this episode, we talk with Jamie Pina, an informatics researcher at RTI International, about how we can visualize data to facilitate public ...

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In the midst of epidemics and pandemics, we often can find examples of ways in which various aspects of everyday life can complicate prevention behavior. Researchers working on human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, prevention have long struggled with this realization. On this episode, we talk with Sarah Roberts of RTI International about ways in which intimate partner violence affects HIV prevention and incidence. 

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During recent months, you may have felt your own mental health could benefit from talking with a health care professional, and yet seeking health care at this time also has been challenging. On this episode, we talk with two researchers, Lissette Saavedra and Anna Yaros, about innovation and hope in the delivery of mental health care.

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Some of our news headlines in recent months have focused on those we have lost as people have died during the pandemic. At the same time, during this same period many new parents have welcomed babies into the world. That raises important questions about the type of health care we are able to offer families. On this episode, we talk with two people who are helping to shape the future of maternal and birth care in North Carolina and ...

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October 21, 2020

Can we ask sociological questions about topic like craft beer production and consumption? Authors of a new book think so. On this episode, we talk with Nathaniel Chapman and David Brunsma about their book, Beer and Racism

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If you do an online search for the phrase “economic growth” you can find millions of website references. We sometimes take the notion of growth as a metric for society for granted. On this episode, we talk with Stevienna de Saille about her new co-authored book, Responsibility Beyond Growth: A Case for Responsible Stagnation

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Social scientists attempt to make sense of the lives that human beings live in the world. That often means trying to put individual lives into the larger context of the world beyond daily routines. On this episode of The Measure of Everyday Life, we talk with Jessica Eise of Purdue University, a researcher who confronts macro-level changes as they are affecting agricultural workers and others around the world. [Note: audio quality ...

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Up until recently, women have faced important technology limitations in terms of options to increase safety for intercourse. That has changed recently, though. On this episode, we talk with Ariane van der Straten of the Women’s Global Health Imperative at RTI International and faculty member at the University of California, San Francisco, about women's perceptions of prevention technologies. 

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September 23, 2020

During the COVID-19 pandemic, visiting a doctor has been complicated. Some have turned to telehealth technology, which has existed for a while but has not been widespread historically. That might be about to change. On this episode, we talk with Saira Haque of RTI International about how telehealth might change the future of your interactions with healthcare. 

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September 16, 2020

During the pandemic, much of our collective attention has been focused on COVID-19. But people continue to face a wide range of health challenges. One of those has been the experience of sickle cell disease, a disease that affects many people and their families and yet which hasn’t always received widespread attention. On this episode, we bring together not only a researcher who can tell us about the experience of sickle cell disea...

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