Changing Lenses: Diversify Your Perspectives

Changing Lenses: Diversify Your Perspectives

We believe in community and human kindness, and seek to understand the realities of people experiencing racism, discrimination and exclusion. When we change our lenses, we change what we see; so we look through their eyes to see what we’ve never known. As our blinders are lifted, new ways to live, work and relate are revealed. I’m your host, Rosie Yeung (she/her), a Chinese-Canadian immigrant with invisible disabilities, and I’m a JEDI speaker, coach and trainer. Do you also want to see social change happen? Then please join me in Changing Lenses! Each episode is hosted on colonized land that was taken from many Indigenous nations, including the Anishinaabe, the Huron-Wendat, and the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. I seek Truth and Reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit and Métis people of Turtle Island, and I call upon us all to decolonize our thinking, not just our systems. Learn more on my website, www.changinglenses.ca.

Episodes

November 23, 2021 6 min

It’s the final episode for Season Two! It’s been an incredible year since the Changing Lenses podcast first launched, and with the support of amazing listeners like YOU, we’ve become a community of JEDI Visionaries with over 2,500 podcast listens so far!

We’ll be taking a break before Season Three, and in this episode I share three key ways you can stay engaged and active in Changing your Lens.

As always, I’d love to hear from you. A...

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Anti-Racism. Black Lives Matter. Allyship and Solidarity between equity-seeking groups.

We’ve touched a bit on these with Changing Lenses podcast guests over the last year, but haven’t dived as deeply into these topics as my friend and fellow podcaster Nura Yunus has. She created the Know Nonsense Podcast to educate listeners about the experiences and systems of racism that exist in Canada and across the world, and the ways in which...

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You may be aware of ways to accommodate physical and mental disabilities. But what about episodic disabilities?

If you don’t know what an episodic disability is, you’re not alone. Once you hear Melissa Egan describe it, you’ll probably realize that you, or someone you know, has one. 

Melissa is the National Lead of Episodic Disabilities at Realize, a Canadian charity that fosters positive change for people living with HIV and other e...

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If we see poverty as the result of financial illiteracy, irresponsibility or a lack of self-control, then the blame falls on the person living in poverty, and the answer is to find a job, spend less, and get financial training.

Financial literacy education is definitely important, and these programs have their benefits. But knowledge alone does not develop capability and behaviour change, any more than knowing you should exercise le...

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We’re single, but we’re not alone. The population of singles are growing in North America – but we’re still a minority group. And like any minority group, we face discrimination and marginalization purely because we don’t have the power of the majority – even more so for single women.

If you’re wondering how that could be, you’re probably married. 😊 And your single friends and family need you to hear this episode.

Because sin...

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Carissa Begonia is a Filipina-American who left a safe corporate job to start her own business.  Until I met her, the only examples I had of entrepreneurs or people following their passions were completely unrelatable for me. Because they were almost all white folks who didn’t have the same immigrant, survival-based, play-it-safe mentality that defined my world.

With Carissa, I’d finally found someone who faced similar cultural barr...

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Many employers are asking where to find and hire “diverse talent”. What they SHOULD be asking is how their recruitment process might discriminate against these candidates once they apply.

In this episode, Safiyah Husein, a lawyer and Senior Policy Analyst at the John Howard Society, shines a light on the hidden dangers behind a widely accepted hiring procedure: the police (or criminal) background check.

This episode is for you if:

  • You...
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    If you’re wondering what you can do in bringing reconciliation and decolonization to Canada – this episode is for you.

     First, we learn what colonization actually looks like. Jessica Dumas of Keeseekoowenin Ojibway First Nation shares personal stories about her family, life experiences, and tragic interaction with police that demonstrate just how effective colonization is. The goal of residential schools was to “kill the Indian in t...

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    “I started learning about residential schools. I started learning about generational trauma and that's when I realized like, okay, there's nothing wrong with us. I'm not broken. There's things that happened that caused us to be living this way. And once I realized that there was nothing wrong with me and with my people, that's when I really started to regain a lot of strength and courage."

    This special episod...

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    Lots of companies have been asking, “What’s the business case for justice, equity, diversity and inclusion (JEDI)?”

    Thomas Benjoe turns that around and asks us to think about how JEDI benefits our community and economy, not just ourselves. Thomas is a member of Muscowpetung First Nation, Chair of the Saskatchewan Chamber of Commerce, and President and CEO of FHQ developments, a business partnership owned by the 11 member First Natio...

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    “I will always be the Black girl first, before Miriam Njoku. I cannot achieve my way out of being seen with prejudice. That's how they view people like me.”

    In this episode, Miriam Njoku changes our lens to reveal the racism she experienced working and living in Canada and Switzerland.

    Does that surprise you? These two countries are probably not the first that comes to mind when you think about racism. After all, Canada prides it...

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    Have you ever been told you can’t do it, or you’re not good enough for something you really wanted? What if you got that message in your whole life starting from childhood? What if abuse or racism you’ve endured created trauma that affects your work or relationships?  How do you heal wounds that you can’t see?

    Miriam Njoku knows the struggle all too well. The abuse that she endured as a child and teenager and the racism she experien...

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    What do you think is the business case for equity, diversity and inclusion? In business, or even not for profit, should morality or humanitarian reasons play a role? Or should it strictly be about profit and shareholder value?

    I have some opinions on this, which I apply in my work as an Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Strategist. But as a podcaster, I've tried to keep the focus on my guests' perspectives, until one of my gue...

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    Ali Ahmed is a professional designated accountant who worked for one of the Big Four international accounting firms before immigrating from Pakistan to Canada. But despite having that professional experience, he couldn't get an accounting job in Canada until he got some "Canadian experience" under his belt.

    As a former recruiter myself, I can verify that the prejudices Ali describes are real. I’m really glad that he'...

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    As I reflect back on the first season of the podcast, it’s become clear to me that systemic change starts with personal change. I believe true inclusion and equity requires sacrificing some of our self-interests, like power, position, even profit. The question is – are we willing to make change happen, if it means changing and sacrificing ourselves?

    In this season finale, I share my thoughts on the “business case” and the costs of t...

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    “I think our greatest fear is that people are jumping into it just because it's good opportunity, or it's good PR. As opposed to knowing, and thinking, and believing that this could actually make us all better as a people.”

    Rev. Dr. Timothy Tang, Director of Tyndale Intercultural Ministries, shares with us what cultural competency means, how it benefits us in life and work, the challenges that practitioners face, and easy (a...

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    “First, in order for racism and discrimination to continue, you need silence. And the second is the 'Otherwise Good People' who won't stand up and support the target of the discriminatory behavior.”

    Shanaaz Gokool, human rights activist and former CEO, is fighting for freedom from workplace discrimination – for herself, and countless others whose stories we don’t know, because they have been silenced and unsupported.

    In t...

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    What happens when capital markets and individual landlords control access to a fundamental human right?

    A house or condo has changed from being a place to live, and a shelter for families, into a profit-making business – something to help us retire earlier.

    Join us as Alyssa Brierley, human rights lawyer, explains the reasons for the global housing crisis, shares real-life stories of tenant eviction and discrimination, and challenges...

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    Did you know that if you don’t have private health insurance, you likely have to pay for life-saving drugs out of your own pocket? Did you know that Canada’s healthcare ranks second last out of 10 countries? Without pharmacare, Canada’s “healthcare” system is NOT universal.

    In part 2 of our healthcare series, Doret Cheng, a practicing pharmacist and university lecturer on global health, explains why healthcare equality is NOT equity...

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    In this two-part series on healthcare in Canada, we explore (and dismantle) some myths about our “free, universal” system which is so lauded by Americans.

    Join us for part one, as pharmacist Doret Cheng takes us behind the scenes of a Toronto Family Medicine Clinic, putting a human face to stigmatized patients. If you think that the problems of homeless people and drug addicts are just housing and mental health – it’s time to change...

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