Future Ecologies

Future Ecologies

Made for audiophiles and nature lovers alike, Future Ecologies is a podcast about the many ways we relate to our living planet. Every episode weaves together narrative storytelling, informative interviews, and science communication, supported by evocative soundscapes and music. Join us each month for a bold inquiry of how our attitude towards nature shapes every aspect of who we are.... Show More

Episodes

August 24, 2020 59 min
While we work on Season 3, we're featuring an episode from one of our favourite podcasts: Plastisphere (http://plastisphere.earth/) ––– We want to know what you want to listen to! Take our 2020 Listener Survey (https://forms.gle/y9KwU9H24ufU79MH9) and help shape the sound of Future Ecologies Season 3. ––– Finally, we're releasing 2 albums: the official soundtracks of Season 2 and our Scales of Change series, featuring the i...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
August 16, 2020 53 min
During the devastating September 9, 2017 earthquake off the coast of southern Mexico, residents of Mexico City and Quetzaltenango, Guatemala witnessed mysterious bursts of light in the sky. These lights, however, were not UFOs, exploding transformers, or evidence of a mysterious government conspiracy - instead, they were examples of a long-documented phenomenon known as “earthquake lights.” Can these mysterious lights in the sky he...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
August 16, 2020 47 min
What do you do when you find the last individual of a species previously thought to be extinct? The two rarest plants on earth both live in the Presidio of San Francisco, they’re both in the same genus, and there’s only one left of each. Is there a future for these species, and if so, what does it look like? And what can species on the brink tell us about ourselves and the future of our ecosystems? Find show notes for this episode...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
August 16, 2020 24 min
Future Ecologies is recorded on the unceded territories of the Musqueam (xwməθkwəy̓əm) Squamish (Skwxwú7mesh), and Tsleil- Waututh (Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh) Nations - otherwise known as Vancouver, British Columbia. But what does that mean? In this proto-episode of Future Ecologies, we talk to indigenous plant diva T’uy’t’tanat Cease Wyss, about how, as non-indigenous people, we can podcast respectfully on unceded indigenous territo...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
August 16, 2020 56 min
The story of modern-day North America begins with the systematic genocide and displacement of indigenous peoples. The social and ecological consequences of this founding trauma have become clearer over time, but so far relatively little has been done to address this at the federal, state, and provincial levels. In this episode, we zero in on two violently displaced tribes in California - the Wiyot and the Amah Mutsun - and tell the...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
August 16, 2020 64 min
Another year, another fire season. We’ve already had a lot to say about wildfire, forest science, traditional ecological knowledge, and prescribed burning, but we’re not done yet! In this episode, we tour the Province of BC (and dip down into Washington State) to meet vigilante fire fighters, researchers, and First Nations Chiefs: all working in their communities towards a future of true wildfire resilience. For extended show notes...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
Lichens: ecosystems unto themselves. They’re diverse, apparently ubiquitous, and foundational to life on terrestrial earth. But this episode isn’t really about lichen. It’s about an endangered species that relies on a lichen diet – a diet that is disappearing as fast as the old growth forest in British Columbia. Southern Mountain Caribou are at the nexus of a heated debate about conservation. What can we save? What should we let go...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
August 16, 2020 51 min
How are human activities changing our oceans, and why do these changes all seem to support a new age of jellyfish? What are these ancient, diverse beings: harbingers of doom, or simply the most well-adapted form of life in the sea? In this episode we go jellyfishing for answers with preeminent jellyfish researchers Dr. Lisa-ann Gershwin and Dr. Lucas Brotz. If you’d like to dive into more detail about a number of fascinating jellyf...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
August 16, 2020 2 min
We’ve dropped an album. Those in the know might recognize the prolific Sunfish Moon Light as the musical alter-ego of Future Ecologies co-host, Adam Huggins. Now you can listen to the original, full-length instrumentals that set the mood for Season 1. Click here (https://www.futureecologies.net/products/true-dreams) to preview the album for free, or buy it for $8. Support this podcast
Share
Mark as Played
August 16, 2020 47 min
Dams remain one of the ultimate demonstrations of human power over nature. Wild rivers can be tamed to deliver energy for industry, lakes for recreation, and water for agriculture. But severing the link between land and sea has come with grave ecological costs. The impact of dams on salmon populations has been especially obvious and painful. This is part one of a two-part series on dam removals. In this episode, we return to the K...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
August 16, 2020 51 min
Forever is a really long time. This episode is about death, and its transformative power on the landscape. It’s also the last episode of Season 1. It may be trivial to remind you that death is an unavoidable part of life. However, death is an act that leaves ripples in life. Some may last for thousands of years.⁣⁣ You might expect us to talk about new sustainable burial technologies (See: Jae Rhim Lee & Katrina Spade), and hone...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
August 16, 2020 39 min
In this conclusion to our series on dam removal, we travel from the Klamath up to the Olympic Peninsula, and the site of the former Elwha and Glines Canyon dams. What did it actually take to bring the dams down, and what lessons can we take forward to other ambitious ecosystem renewal projects? For extended show notes, musical credits and more, head to www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe-1-10-rushing-downriver (http://www.futureecolo...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
The past two years have been the worst fire years on record across the west coast of North America, with whole communities being engulfed in flames and smoke enveloping major cities for weeks. But as the airways fill once again with stories of valiant fire-fighters and people who’ve lost their homes, we answer some burning questions that seem to always fly under the radar. For example: How long have fires been burning on this plane...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
We've unlocked our 11-episode Patreon series – Dr. Lisa-ann Gershwin, and occasionally the two of us, dive deep into jellyfish species and phyla. Find stories and science on: - Aurelia labiata (the moon jelly) - Turritopsis dohrnii (the immortal jelly) - Chrysaora achlyos (the black sea nettle) - Bazinga rieki (the little trickster who eats sunlight) - Chironex fleckeri (the deadly box jelly) - Aequoria victoria (the nobel-priz...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
August 16, 2020 52 min
Almost exactly one year ago, a series of devastating earthquakes rocked southern Mexico. But what if it’s not the earthquakes themselves that pose the greatest threat to these communities? The conflict between institutional and grassroots disaster response in the aftermath of these earthquakes provides a powerful illustration of the tensions that have underlain the concept of development ever since President Truman’s second inaugur...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
In this second part of our two-episode series, On Fire, we look at ways to move our civilization forward – without continuing to deny the role of fire in our landscapes. We discuss how prescribed burns are currently conducted, radical new (and old) perspectives on land management policy, and practical techniques for everyone in fire country to protect their homes, their communities, and their forests. Find shownotes, sources, and ...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
This is our final chapter, and our last genus of Dragon: Immobilis – the dragons of Limited Behaviour. This genus contains only two species: Immobilis signum, or the Dragon of Tokenism, and Immobilis jevonsii, or the Rebound Effect. They are among the most pernicious dragons, especially for people who already care deeply about the climate. As we unpack this small but important genus, we discover how they are tied to the global move...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
In our sixth genus, we dive deep into the Dragons of Sunk Cost – the investments that work against our climate interests. Some of these may simply be financial, but they may also be emotional: our goals and aspirations, our patterns of behaviour, and our attachments to the places around us. In this episode, we focus our attention on Place Attachment, as we tag along with the ṮEṮÁĆES Climate Action Project (https://www.sgicommunityr...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
Our fifth genus includes the Dragons of Perceived Risk: functional, temporal, financial, social, and physical. These dragons are at the root of all fears – steering our decisions in a continuous assessment of risk versus reward. When it comes to climate change, the risks are global, but distributed unequally. In this chapter, we explore what physical risk can mean to the people dedicated to the health of the planet, as we follow on...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played
The Dragons of Discredence are agents of mistrust – the species of this genus are responsible for climate deniers, contrarians, and conspiracy theorists. But it’s not only the fringe that suffers from the dragons of discredence. They can act in subtle ways on all of us: casting doubt on well-intentioned policy, and dissuading us from aligning our self-interest with the interests of our environment. To tip the scales, we have to pro...
Read more
Share
Mark as Played

Chat About Future Ecologies

Popular Podcasts

Crime Junkie
The Piketon Massacre
The Piketon Massacre
On the night of April 21, 2016 in rural Piketon, Ohio - eight members of the Rhoden family were viciously murdered execution style in their homes. Two years later in 2018, their neighbors, the Wagners, were arrested and charged with committing the largest massacre in Ohio’s history. Shocked by the arrests, this once close-knit and religious community remains divided and unable to cope. Was a respected and reputable Piketon family responsible for this unimaginable murder spree? Our team will examine the deep ties that connected both families. We’ll examine the evidence and possible motives for the crimes. For the first time we’ll speak with townspeople, psychological experts, respected investigators, friends and members of both families. Are the Wagners responsible for the murders, and if convicted, will they be executed? Or is it possible that there is still a murderer at large waiting to kill again?
Dateline NBC
Dateline NBC
Current and classic episodes, featuring compelling true-crime mysteries, powerful documentaries and in-depth investigations.
    Music, radio and podcasts, all free. Listen online or download the iHeartRadio App.

    Connect

    © 2020 iHeartMedia, Inc.