The Discipline and Punish Podcast

The Discipline and Punish Podcast

Interviews with academics and experts who work on issues related to the U.S. criminal justice system. Host Thomas Baker is a PhD student in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. He is a former police officer who studies police culture and police use of force. Thomas is a U.S. Army veteran and a 2018 Pat Tillman Scholar award winner.

Episodes

September 27, 2020 74 min

On this episode, Brian Burghart and I discuss his work to document every police related deaths in the U.S. since the year 2000. We talk about the lack of a comprehensive government run national database, why he came to create Fatal Encounters, what was required to create it, how it’s managed, and the future of the database.

From www.fatalencounters.org:

Hi, my name is D. Brian Burghart. I’m a lifelong, award-winning journalist. I’ve ...

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www.thomasowenbaker.com for podcasts, LIVE streams, writing, and more.

In this episode, Ashley N. Jackson from Washington University-St. Louis and I discuss the psychological impacts of police violence on adolescent Black boys. We talk about the history of race in the U.S., how it intersects police violence, "the talk", and Jackson's research.

About Ashley N. Jackson:
https://sites.wustl.edu/ajackson/

In 2009, I earned a BS...

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www.thomasowenbaker.com

In this episode, Professor Alex Vitale from Brooklyn College and I discuss his book The End of Policing. We talk about the current crisis and how the use of policing as a form of social control can be reduced in the U.S. We talk about the drug war, the mental health crisis, deindustrialization, and automated driving technology. 

http://www.alex-vitale.info/

Alex S. Vitale is Professor of Sociology and Coordinat...

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On this episode, Green Beret, Tillman Scholar, and Harvard Law graduate Logan Leslie and I discuss the fuzzy line between domestic law enforcement and the military. We talk about the veteran experience and how the Global War on Terrorism influences U.S. policing. We also discuss how to control police use of force and also touch on his recent experience working the protests in Atlanta with his National Guard unit. 

Per the Tillman Fo...

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On this episode, Professor Rebecca Earle and I discuss early forms of social control in the Americas. Professor Earle studies the history of food and focuses on the Spanish conquest. She describes what “policing” might have looked like in 1492 and how the diets of European and Native populations were used as a tool of statecraft. We also discuss the cr...

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Check out https://www.schumachercg.com/ for information regarding Rick’s consultant work. 

On this episode, former psychological operations soldier Rick Schumacher and I discuss his path into the military, the recent deployment of federal officers to U.S. cities, as well as the use of PSYOPS and propaganda during the recent national uprisings. We also d...

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Check out coffeeordie.com to see Ethan’s recent work.

On this episode, Coffee or Die senior editor Ethan Rocke and I discuss his recent trip to the Capital Hill Autonomous Zone (CHAZ) in Seattle. We also talk about his experiences as a Marine combat correspondent, the social division currently facing the U.S., his recent conversation with General James ...

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Please visit www.thomasowenbaker.com for more podcasts, videos, streams, and writing.

On this episode, Guy Hamilton-Smith and I discuss sex crimes, his experience as a victim and an offender, the origins of the #metoo movement, how the U.S. manages sex related offenses, obstacles to achieving justice for victims of sex crimes, and how to improve the system. 

Bio: Hamilton-Smith advocates for better mechanisms of accountability in our...

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FROM THE BATTLEFIELD TO THE BOOKSHELF – EXPLORING POLICE FICTION – Terry Weaver Jr. Ep. 20

On this episode, Terry Weaver and I discuss his book A Dark Day in Texas. We talk about the Pat Tillman Foundation, his time as a Navy Corpsman, and the role those experiences have played in shaping the police fiction he creates. 

Terry grew up in the Mountain View Trailerpark in San Bernardino California, a suburb of Los Angeles. His childhood...

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On this episode, Professor Valcore and I discuss the history of policing in the transgender community, the current state of affairs, what impact has training on addressing the problem, and steps we can take to create an institution that provides all communities with fair and equitable police services.  

Jace L. Valcore, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Houston Downtown. His educational backgrou...

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On this episode, Professor Butler and I discuss his research, his negative experience with police as a Black child growing up in Chicago, his martial arts and policing careers, his transition to academia, and the current state of police defensive tactics training in the United States.

Dr. Jeremy Butler is a newly minted Assistant Professor at Judson University in Illinois. He recently completed his PhD at the University of Illinois ...

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Brenda Gerber Vincent is a former Deputy Finance Director for the “Mike Pence for Indiana” campaign and later served as First Lady Karen Pence’s Chief of Staff. Currently, she works to bring economic opportunity to the greater Ft. Wayne Indiana area. We talk about our shared experience at the Aspen Institute’s Socrates Program earlier this year and how she is leveraging what she learned to bring change to her community. 

Brenda join...

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On this episode, Professor Ed Maguire from Arizona State University joins me to discuss the current crisis in policing. We talk about his working-class path through academia and journey to martial arts, choke holds in law enforcement, the Rayshard Brooks police homicide, and the current state of police defensive tactics in America. Professor Maguire studies policing and is a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu instructor. 

His FREE recent book on m...

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On this episode, Professor Rod Graham from the Sociology and Criminology Department at Old Dominion University joins me. We talk about how academics can engage the general public during an age of rapid technological change, the unique power of the George Floyd homicide video, the uprisings and social division, class in higher education, and how to build a new collective national ethos for the 21st century. Professor Graham has a fa...

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In this episode, Professor Shadd Maruna and I discuss his work on desistance from crime. We talk about how desistance is becoming a social movement, the importance of centering the lived experiences of the incarcerated and formerly incarcerated, and what we can learn from other social movements as we move to make change in policing following the George Floyd murder subsequent uprisings.  

Prior to moving to Queen's University Be...

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In this episode, Professor Joe Hamm discusses the role of public trust in policing. We talk about the current national crisis, what needs to happen before the process of building trust in policing can even begin, why it is so important, and his research on the subject.  

Joe Hamm is Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Environmental Science at Michigan State University. A psychologist by training, his work lies at the nexus o...

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In this episode, Professor Reuben Howden explains the difference between strangulation and choking, what impact these have on the human body, and application in law enforcement. We also discuss the recent uprisings across and how to move forward.

Dr. Howden’s research program focuses on genetic control of cardiopulmonary function at baseline and under specific environmental conditions. Further, Dr. Howden is investigating the mechan...

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On this episode, Dr. Margaret Webber Smith and I discuss her work on female Islamic State (ISIS) members who reside in the United States. We also talk about her career as an army officer, her new job at the United States Military Academy at West Point, and our shared love for the Pat Tillman Foundation. Margaret is a U.S. Army Officer with over fifteen years on Active Duty. She originally enlisted in 2004 to complete her undergradu...

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On this episode, Professor Thaddeus Johnson and I discuss his path in and out of policing, his research, the George Floyd Murder, Codiv-19, police management, and the future of U.S. policing. Thaddeus Johnson is a Criminal Justice and Criminology professor at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Following his career in law enforcement, Thaddeus received a bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Criminal Justice at the University of Tenne...

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On this episode, I talk with Lauren Morgan about the complicated relationship between the foster care system and the juvenile criminal justice system in the U.S. Lauren is a PhD student in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri – St. Louis. Prior to becoming an academic Lauren was (and still is) a professional water skier. We also talk a little bit about the George Floyd murder in Minneapol...

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