The Received Wisdom

The Received Wisdom

Are robots racist? Should we regulate gene editing? Have people stopped trusting experts? Does scientific research make the world a more unequal place? The Received Wisdom is a podcast about how to realize the potential of science and technology by challenging the received wisdom. Join Shobita and Jack as they talk to thinkers and doers from around the world about governing science and technology to make the world a better place.

Episodes

January 12, 2022 59 min

In this episode, Shobita and Jack discuss the recent conviction of the now-notorious Elizabeth Holmes, former CEO of Theranos, and what it means for tech hype. They talk about the UK government's recent decision to review the racial bias embedded in medical devices, and consider whether this will move equity objectives forward. And they speak with Kyle Powys Whyte, George Willis Pack Professor of Environment and Sustainability,...

Share
Mark as Played

This month, Shobita and Jack discuss efforts to engage publics in the development and regulation of AI, including the AI Bill of Rights proposed by the White house, and the most recent Facebook controversies. And they talk to sociologist and lawyer Karen Levy about her forthcoming book examining the rise of technology-based surveillance in the trucking industry and its social, political, and labor implications.

- Eric Lander and Alo...

Share
Mark as Played

In this episode, Shobita and Jack compare how the US and UK governments are managing risk and uncertainty in both pandemic policymaking and in their evolving artificial intelligence strategies. And they chat with Jason Delborne, a professor at North Carolina State University who has done both research and public and policy engagement related to gene drives, a new form of biotechnology that could transform our ecosystems.

National Ac...

Share
Mark as Played

Episode 19: Climate Change, Vaccines, AI, and the Lure of Technochauvinism featuring Meredith Broussard

This month, Jack and Shobita discuss the recent IPCC report on climate change and the politics of vaccine "hesitancy", and puzzle over the lure of technological fixes to solve complex problems. And Jack speaks with Meredith Broussard, Associate Professor of the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University a...

Share
Mark as Played

Jack and Shobita talk about her recent experiences giving Congressional testimony about equity in energy innovation, question the meaning of Freedom Day in the UK, puzzle over the FDA's recent approval of a new Alzheimer's drug, and interview Ben Tarnoff, co-founder of Logic Magazine, about tech worker organizing.


- House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, Subcommittee on Energy, "Fostering Equity in Energy Inn...

Share
Mark as Played

Shobita and Jack discuss the Innovation and Competition Act making its way through the US Congress as well as the most up-to-date geopolitics of COVID, including the TRIPS waiver and the "lab leak" theory. And we interview Kate Crawford, a leading scholar on the social and political implications of artificial intelligence.

- Kate Crawford (2021). Atlas of AI: Power, Politics, and the Planetary Costs of Artificial Intelligenc...

Share
Mark as Played

In this episode, Jack and Shobita talk about the controversy over making COVID-19 vaccines globally available by waiving the patents, and the recent crash of one of Tesla's "self-driving" cars. And they chat with science journalist Angela Saini about her recent book Superior: The Return of Race Science. They discuss why assumptions about the biology of race seem so persistent even in the context of understanding COVID-1...

Share
Mark as Played

Episode 15--Innovation Imaginaries and the Politics of Evidence-Based Policymaking ft. David Goldston

This month, Jack and Shobita talk about the role of government in both funding and regulating innovation, as well as the politics of vaccine approval as European governments suspended distribution of the AstraZeneca vaccine. And we speak with David Goldston, currently director of MIT's Washington office, who has extensive experi...

Share
Mark as Played

In this episode, Shobita and Jack talk about President Biden's plans for science and technology policy and his appointment of Alondra Nelson as Deputy Director for Science and Society in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, as well as the COVID-19 vaccine rollout in the United States and United Kingdom. And they chat with Maya Goldenberg, philosophy professor at the University of Guelph, about vaccine hesita...

Share
Mark as Played

It's a New Year, and may soon be a new world! Shobita and Jack discuss the big changes brewing in the US and UK, from the new president to Brexit, and consider what it all means for science and technology policy. And we chat with Lina Dencik, Professor and Director of the Data Justice Lab at Cardiff University.


Lina Dencik (2019). "Social Justice in an Age of Datafication." Talk at the Alan Turing Institute. May 28.


Lina ...

Share
Mark as Played

Shobita and Jack reflect on the US election and the future of conservatism and exciting vaccine news, and speak with philosopher and STS forefather Langdon Winner about the politics of technology today. Winner recently released a new edition of his groundbreaking book, The Whale and the Reactor: A Search for Limits in an Age of High Technology.

- Langdon Winner (2020). The Whale and the Reactor: A Search for Limits in an Age of High...

Share
Mark as Played

Episode 11--Patent Activism, Access to Medicines, and The Social Dilemma featuring Priti Krishtel

In this episode, Jack and Shobita discuss the growing politicization of COVID-19 science and at listeners' request, review the Netflix movie The Social DIlemma. And Shobita speaks with Priti Krishtel, co-executive director of the i-MAK, the Initiative for Medicines, Access, and Knowledge about how we can reform the patent system to ...

Share
Mark as Played

In this episode, Shobita and Jack talk about how patents might shape access to a COVID-19 vaccine. And, in light of a recent report by the US and UK national scientific academies, we talk about heritable human genome editing (using CRISPR-Cas9) and the role that the world's citizens might play in deciding whether and how it might proceed, with Ben Hurlbut, Associate Professor in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State Univ...

Share
Mark as Played

In this episode, Shobita and Jack discuss the recent US congressional hearings with the Big Tech CEOs, and the curious role that behavioral scientists have played in the UK's COVID-19 response. They also chat with Jill Fisher, Professor of Social Medicine at University of North Carolina--Chapel Hill and recent author of Adverse Events: Race, Inequality, and the Testing of New Pharmaceuticals, about the "healthy volunteers&#...

Share
Mark as Played

In this episode, Jack and Shobita discuss big tech's decisions to pull back from facial recognition technology, and how the Black Lives Matter movement is influencing science and technology overall. And they chat with Virginia Eubanks, author of Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor (St. Martin's Press, 2018) and Associate Professor of Political Science at the University at Albany, ...

Share
Mark as Played

Episode 7--The Politics of Geoengineering, Climate, and COVID-19 featuring Jane Flegal

Shobita and Jack discuss the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and its implications in the United States and Britain, and interview Jane Flegal, Program Officer overseeing US climate at The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, a Fellow at the Institute for Science, Innovation, and Society at the University of Oxford, Adjunct Professor in the School for t...

Share
Mark as Played

Jack and Shobita talk to five experts in science, technology, policy, and society about their perspectives and experiences with COVID-19 around the world. Interviews include Monamie Bhadra (Singapore), Silvio Funtowicz (Italy), Roger Pielke (US), Poonam Pandey (India), and Michael Veale (UK).

Guests:

- Monamie Bhadra Haines is Assistant Professor of Global Science, Technology, and Society in the School of Social Sciences at Nanyang T...

Share
Mark as Played

Jack and Shobita compare the US and UK responses to the coronavirus outbreak, and consider the legacy of the US approach to research funding policy 75 years after publication of the famous report by Vannevar Bush, Science: The Endless Frontier. And we speak with Ben Pauli (@benjaminjpauli), professor at Kettering University, about his recent book on the politics of the Flint Water Crisis.

- Benjamin Pauli (2019). Flint Fights Ba...

Share
Mark as Played

Episode 4: Race, Identity, Reparations, and the Role of Ancestral DNA Testing

In this episode, Shobita and Jack answer listener questions, discuss Jack's trip to the weird world of the World Economic Forum in Davos, and talk to Professor Alondra Nelson about the social life of ancestral DNA testing. Professor Nelson is the Harold F. Linder Chair in the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton Uni...

Share
Mark as Played

Shobita and Jack discuss what responsibilities scientists and scientific institutions bear when research results—like DNA phenotyping or human germline gene editing—are used to morally dubious ends. And they consider whether the problem with Big Tech is actually just one of Big Business. Jack interviews tech journalist Nicholas Carr, author of numerous books including Utopia is Creepy and Other Provocations (2017).

Links discussed i...

Share
Mark as Played

Popular Podcasts

    If you can never get enough true crime... Congratulations, you’ve found your people.

    Bob Saget's Here For You

    BOB SAGET’S HERE FOR YOU is a podcast that is like no other— For one, this podcast has guests who are friends of Bob’s, or just really interesting people who many of you know and love. Secondly, this podcast is unique because it goes inside Bob Saget’s mind, and then quickly filters out through his mouth. Bob has a way of calming people he has conversations with as well as being entertaining and often informative. Bob talks with his guests with genuine empathy and humor, while reaching his unusually diverse audience that he talks to as a friend, Bob is the dad with great advice, the irreverent funny guy who’s always there when you need a laugh, and the free-associative Bob who goes off on crazy tangents then returns to the subject at hand, as serious or as comedic as it may be, to wrap up each episode in a way only Bob can do. Because he really does believe, “He’s here for you."

    Dateline NBC

    Current and classic episodes, featuring compelling true-crime mysteries, powerful documentaries and in-depth investigations.

    The MLK Tapes

    According to the official story, on April 4th, 1968, a lone gunman assassinated Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. That man, James Earl Ray, pled guilty and for most people the case was closed. The MLK Tapes, a new true crime podcast from the creators of Atlanta Monster and Monster: DC Sniper, explores rare recordings of eye-witness testimony and new interviews with people who were there to reveal the true story of the plot to kill Dr. King.

    The Daily

    This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Advertise With Us

For You

    Music, radio and podcasts, all free. Listen online or download the iHeart App.

    Connect

    © 2022 iHeartMedia, Inc.

    • Help
    • Privacy Policy
    • Terms of Use
    • AdChoicesAd Choices