CQ Budget

CQ Budget

CQ's budget tracker David Lerman, and his colleagues, follow and explain how lawmakers in Congress spend the nation's money.... Show More

Episodes

September 23, 2019

The Senate takes up a stopgap funding measure to avoid a government shutdown next month. But the continuing resolution does a lot more than just extend current funding.

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After months of delay, Senate appropriators finally got to work on their spending bills for the new fiscal year, which begins in just two weeks. But it was a slower start than lawmakers had hoped for, and unlike last year’s effort, it was deeply partisan. The Appropriations Committee approved its overall spending limits for each of its 12 bills, but it wasn’t pretty. Where do they go from here?

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Congress is finally back in town after a long summer recess and the race is on to avoid a government shutdown before the new fiscal year begins Oct. 1. Not one of the 12 annual spending bills needed to fund the government has cleared the Senate yet and there are only three weeks to go. CQ Budget has a preview of what's to come.  
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Even though Congress is still in a prolonged summer recess, spending battles between the White House and Congress have only been multiplying. The Trump administration plans to divert money from disaster relief and other programs to fund more immigration detention beds and some immigration court facilities - and a lot of senior appropriators aren’t happy about it.

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With worries about a possible recession in the near future, the Trump administration has thrown around the idea of implementing new tax cuts to help stimulate the economy, only to flip flop on the idea multiple times later on. Specifically, the administration has flipped on two types of tax cuts - capital gains indexing, which is favored by Republican senators, and payroll taxes. With the Democrats in control in the House, host Jen...

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House Democrats are pushing new changes to the tax code aimed at helping low income individuals and families, with some lawmakers calling for an increase to the corporate tax rate. In this episode, CQ Roll Call's Doug Sword explains who stands to gain and lose.

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CQ Roll Call's Budget Editor Peter Cohn combed through the numbers since Congress passed the Budget Control Act of 2011 and found something remarkable: the spending caps produced some results but most of the savings were because of factors out of Congress' hands. 

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Senate Democrats are preparing to fight the Trump administration over a $10,000 limit on deductions for state and local taxes, says CQ Roll Call's budget and tax editor Peter Cohn. And some conservatives are pressing the White House to bypass Congress to index capital gains taxes to inflation, in a move that would cut taxes for wealthy stock owners.

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With a new budget deal about to become law, CQ Roll Call senior budget reporter Paul M. Krawzak explains how raising the debt limit and raising the spending levels will shape government budget decisions this fall and the year to come. With overall spending limits set, the House will have to revisit the 10 spending bills it has already passed and find $15 billion to cut.

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Congress is racing to complete work on some big-ticket items before adjourning for the August recess. CQ Roll Call's budget and appropriations reporter Kellie Mejdrich reports on a deal in the works to extend the debt limit and set spending levels for two years. And  finance reporter Doug Sword explains why the House plans to vote on a bill to shore up struggling pension plans.  Meanwhile, the Senate plans to give final approva...

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With new warnings that the U.S. could run out of money to meet its obligations, Congress and the Trump administration are racing to raise the debt limit before lawmakers head home for August, says CQ Roll Call’s appropriations reporter Jennifer Shutt. And tax reporter Doug Sword explains how oil refiners could get up to a $10 billion windfall with an expired tax credit unless Congress intervenes.

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With only 25 days left with both the House and Senate in session before the new fiscal year begins, the Senate has yet to draft any of its 12 spending bills and has no plan in place to pass them. The result is likely another short-term stopgap funding measure as congressional leaders struggle to reach a bipartisan deal on overall spending limits. CQ Roll Call's chief budget reporter Paul M. Krawzak explains why Congress has rea...
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House Democrats passed the Financial Services spending bill that includes some controversial provisions, says CQ Roll Call's banking reporter Jim Saksa. Those include blocking money for a border wall, increasing funding to enforce sanctions on Iran, and allowing the District of Columbia to fund abortions.

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House Democrats are pushing new changes to the tax code aimed at helping low income individuals and families, with some lawmakers calling for an increase to the corporate tax rate. In this episode, CQ Roll Call's Doug Sword explains who stands to gain and lose.

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As White House and congressional leaders prepare for another meeting this week to get a bipartisan spending caps deal, CQ Roll Call's Paul M. Krawzak unpacks the political sticking points, the pros and cons of a one-year or two-year agreement, and other potential obstacles.

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House Democrats are packaging spending bills with the aim of completing all 12 by the end of the month, a goal that is likely to generate a lot of policy debates and amendments, explains Jennifer Shutt in this episode of the CQ Budget podcast. The first package contains five bills including the two largest, Defense and Labor-HHS-Education.

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In an usually candid interview with CQ Roll Call's budget reporter Paul Krawzak, the ex Congressional Budget Office director Keith Hall said the often secretive process the Republicans followed defeated their effort to repeal Obamacare in 2017. He also urged Congress to deal with the rising deficits that will fall on the backs of younger Americans, saying that in the coming decade 50 percent of federal funding will be spent...
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House lawmakers on Tuesday again will try to clear a $19.1 billion disaster aid package via unanimous consent after Republican Rep. Chip Roy of Texas blocked it Friday for a variety of reasons; delaying much needed funds for states still recovering from natural disasters.
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House appropriators this week will take up the biggest of the 12 annual spending bills, the $690 billion Pentagon measure that includes some prickly issues such as funding for Taliban expenses for peace talks with the U.S. and money to give the Pentagon more F-35 fighter jets than it requested, says CQ Roll Call's senior defense reporter John M. Donnelly. He lays out what is likely to happen to the measure that assumes higher s...

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Lawmakers are struggling to find agreement on an aid package to help states recover from natural disasters, says CQ Roll Call's budget and appropriations reporter Kellie Mejdrich. She lays out the issues preventing Congress from passing a disaster aid package.

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