The Journal.

The Journal.

The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.

Episodes

May 18, 2022 19 min
Cryptocurrencies are volatile, but so-called stablecoins were meant to be the exception. But after one major stablecoin, TerraUSD, crashed spectacularly, it caused ripple effects in cryptoland. WSJ’s Caitlin Ostroff explains why regulators are spooked, and what this could mean for the broader economy. Further Reading: Crash of TerraUSD Shakes Crypto. ‘There Was a Run on the Bank.  Cryptocurrency TerraUSD Falls to 11 Cents, Cre...
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We speak with Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control about eroding trust in public health, vaccine approvals for children under 5 and the one million Americans who have now died from COVID-19.Further Listening:The Future of Everything Festival Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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China’s sputtering economy is altering the balance of power among its top leaders. For years, President Xi Jinping sidelined his second in command, Premier Li Keqiang, a proponent of economic liberalization. WSJ’s Lingling Wei explains that Li is now gaining clout and pushing back on Xi's socialist policies. Further Reading:  - China’s Economic Distress Deepens as Lockdowns Drag On  - China’s Forgotten Premier Steps Out of...
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The digital startup Cerebral began prescribing ADHD drugs like Adderall over the internet, after federal rules loosened. But recently, there have been concerns from inside and outside the company that Cerebral was not careful enough. Now the company has stopped prescribing Adderall to new patients. WSJ's Rolfe Winkler reports. Further Reading: -Startups Make It Easier to Get ADHD Drugs. That Made Some Workers Anxious.  -Ce...
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Fidelity Investments will be the first major retirement-plan provider to allow bitcoin in its 401(k) plans. WSJ's Anne Tergesen explains the move and the blowback that followed. Further Reading: -Fidelity to Allow Retirement Savers to Put Bitcoin in 401(k) Accounts  -Labor Department Criticizes Fidelity’s Plan to Put Bitcoin on 401(k) Menu  Further Listening: -How Inflation is Causing Americans to 'Unretire'  ...
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The Federal Reserve has never managed to significantly decrease inflation without causing job losses, but it's trying to now. Central Bank officials hope they can cool down an overheated economy by raising interest rates. But as WSJ’s Jon Hilsenrath explains, the Fed risks triggering a recession. Further Reading: -Hot Economy, Rising Inflation: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This Further Listening: ...
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Every year, more than a million U.S. high-school students learn about investing through stock-picking games. But what do these games really teach? WSJ's Jason Zweig explains the shortfalls of traditional stock-market games, and teacher Mike Scanlan describes the different approach his school is taking. Further Reading:  -What Teenagers Really Learn From Stock-Market Games   -Current Baker Scholar and Alumnus Partner to Imp...
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Last year, Facebook blocked news pages to pre-empt Australian legislation that would force it to pay publishers for content. But it also took down the Facebook pages of non-news organizations like hospitals, emergency services and charities. Was the move inadvertent or a negotiating tactic? We talk to WSJ's Keach Hagey about what she learned. Further Reading: Facebook Deliberately Caused Havoc in Australia to Influence New ...
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In 1838, the Jesuits who founded Georgetown University sold 272 enslaved people to pay off the school's debts and keep the college afloat. Nearly 200 years later, the Jesuits want to make amends. But as Lee Hawkins explains, the path to racial healing can be a messy one. Further Reading: - For Georgetown, Jesuits and Slavery Descendants, Bid for Racial Healing Sours Over Reparations  Learn more about your ad choices. Vis...
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After decades of debate, the Food and Drug Administration is proposing a ban on menthol cigarettes. A researcher of the tobacco industry explains the benefits of a potential ban, and WSJ’s Jennifer Maloney explains why some want menthols to stay on the market. Further Reading: - FDA Advances Ban on Menthol Cigarettes - Why Does the U.S. Want to Ban Menthol Cigarettes? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adcho...
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The European Union announced a proposal to ban purchases of Russian oil exports, after Germany, Europe’s biggest economy, dropped its opposition. WSJ’s Bojan Pancevski explains why Germany was such a holdout. Further Reading: -EU Proposes Ban on Russian Oil Imports, Sending Prices Higher -Germany Drops Opposition to Embargo on Russian Oil Further Listening:-If Russia Invades Ukraine, Can the U.S. Deliver on Sanctions? Lear...
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May 3, 2022 17 min
A leaked draft opinion from the Supreme Court indicates the court may be preparing to overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 precedent that established a constitutional right to an abortion. WSJ’s Brent Kendall explains what this could mean for women in America and why this is a significant moment in the history of the court.  Further Reading: Supreme Court Is Investigating Leak of Draft Opinion Overruling Roe v. Wade  Learn more abou...
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Economic data from March revealed a new trend: hundreds of thousands of Americans are "unretiring" and returning to the workforce. WSJ's Harriet Torry reports that rising inflation is making retirement unsustainable for many. We also hear from two retirees who have started looking for work. Further Reading: -Everything Costs More, and That's Disrupting Retirement for Many Further Listening: -Why Older Americ...
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As many companies evaluate how to return to the office, Airbnb announced a new ‘work-from-anywhere’ policy that will let its employees work remotely from 170 countries. Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky explains how he arrived at the idea, and how the policy could serve as a blueprint for others companies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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April 28, 2022 19 min
With rising housing prices and concerns about affordability, a new approach to solving the problem has emerged. Its answer is to build more housing of all types. Meet the Yimbys. WSJ’s Christine Mai-Duc explains the origins of the movement and how it's gaining traction around the country. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Governor Ron DeSantis revoked the theme park's self-governing privileges after Disney opposed Florida's "Don’t Say Gay" bill. WSJ's Robbie Whelan explains the fight that led to this decision and what it might mean for one of the state’s largest employers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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April 26, 2022 16 min
Afghanistan is dealing with an unprecedented humanitarian crisis, which has accelerated since the Taliban took power. Jobs are scarce, the nation’s suffering a devastating drought and Afghans are going hungry. As WSJ’s Sune Engel Rasmussen explains, Afghans are resorting to increasingly desperate measures to survive, such as selling kidneys. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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April 25, 2022 16 min
Twitter announced today that it plans to sell itself to Elon Musk for $44 billion. WSJ’s Liz Hoffman explains the unusual nature of how the deal came together and what it could mean for Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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April 22, 2022 19 min
In late March, CNN launched its new streaming service, CNN+. But less than a month later, it’s shutting down. WSJ’s Joe Flint explains how this expensive project became the collateral damage of a corporate takeover. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The Biden administration announced plans this week to reduce the student loan burden for millions of people in the U.S. WSJ’s Gabriel T. Rubin explains how the plan involves retooling an existing program that has enrolled millions of people but provided few with relief. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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