The Journal.

The Journal.

The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.

Episodes

May 6, 2021 22 min
Oil giant Chevron has been locked in a decades-long legal battle with people living in the Ecuadorian Amazon, who claim they were harmed by oil drilling. After a $9.5 billion judgment in Ecuador in 2011, the company has fought back hard. WSJ's Sara Randazzo tells the story, and the plaintiff's lawyer, Steven Donziger, speaks about the case while under house arrest.
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Housing prices around the country have been skyrocketing. WSJ's Nicole Friedman explains what makes the hot market so unusual. And a real estate agent and a prospective buyer from Boise, Idaho, share how the boom is changing their city.
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May 4, 2021 17 min
As Covid-19 cases were spiking in India, the government said it had removed dozens of social media posts relating to the outbreak. WSJ's Newley Purnell traces the ongoing conflict between the government and global tech giants over freedom of speech in the world's largest democracy.
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Black and Latina women have been disproportionally affected by job losses during the pandemic. They're also one of the most financially fragile groups in this country. We talk with three women of color about what getting laid off in the pandemic has meant for them.
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After longtime "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek died last November, the show has been running a public search for a replacement, with guest hosts like Aaron Rodgers and LeVar Burton. We talk with the show's executive producer, Mike Richards, about how the search is going.
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There's a disconnect in the lumber market. The price of lumber is the highest it's ever been, but the price of the timber - the raw material - is at record lows. WSJ's Ryan Dezember on the paradox of the lumber market and tree farmer Joe Hopkins on how he's getting through this strange moment.
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WSJ's Shan Li covered the pandemic's start in Wuhan, China. Now, she is in the midst of the world's worst outbreak yet, in India. Shan told us about what it's like on the ground as numbers rise dramatically and resources are in short supply.
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The Biden administration has made big promises to fight climate change. U.S. Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm discusses the push for clean energy and what it means for the U.S. oil and gas industry. Plus, WSJ's Russell Gold explores what's next for oil companies.
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Imaad Zuberi's jet-setting lifestyle afforded him high-profile connections all around the world and made him a heavyweight donor in DC. But at the same time, according to documents, Zuberi was also collecting information for the CIA. WSJ's Byron Tau tells the story of Zuberi's rise and fall.
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Twelve of the biggest teams in European soccer announced Sunday they were forming a "Super League." 48 hours later, the plan was dead. WSJ's Joshua Robinson explains how a backlash from fans killed an audacious plan to remake the business of soccer.
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Coinbase, a popular cryptocurrency exchange, went public last week. WSJ's Paul Vigna explains how its co-founder Brian Armstrong wants to make crypto as easy as email.
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A day after a jury convicted Derek Chauvin of murdering George Floyd, two members of the Floyd family sat down with WSJ's Erin Ailworth to share their reactions to the trial and verdict.
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More than 130 rural hospitals across the U.S. have closed since 2010, while even more have cut back on services. WSJ's Brian Spegele shares the story of one Wyoming community where residents are fighting a decline in services at their local hospital by doing something drastic: creating a hospital of their own.
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Dr. Özlem Türeci is the chief medical officer of BioNTech, which created the first Covid-19 vaccine to be authorized in the U.S. We speak with Dr. Türeci about the technology behind the vaccine and the promise it holds for treating other diseases.
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Bernie Madoff died this week in prison while serving a 150-year sentence for masterminding one of the biggest financial frauds. We speak with one of his victims, and WSJ's Jamie Heller explains how Madoff stole billions of dollars from his clients in his notorious Ponzi scheme.
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April 15, 2021 16 min
Ghost guns are homemade, untraceable guns. The Biden administration is proposing new gun control measures to regulate their sales. WSJ's Zusha Elinson explains how these guns have been on the rise and under the radar.
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Six cases of a rare blood clotting disorder have led U.S. health officials to pause the use of Johnson & Johnson's Covid-19 vaccine. Though it's not known if the vaccine is behind the blood clotting, WSJ's Jonathan D. Rockoff says the pause could impact efforts to vaccinate the country.
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As the country watches the trial of the police officer charged with the murder of George Floyd, Minneapolis is reeling from the killing of another unarmed Black man by police in a nearby suburb. WSJ's Erin Ailworth describes the tension on the ground.
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With the launch of her latest investment fund, Cathie Wood is betting big on outer space. But it's not the first time she's backed a nascent industry. WSJ's Michael Wursthorn says she's become a star investor by backing innovative companies, delighting investors and attracting critics along the way.
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China has been testing a digital yuan for the past year. WSJ's James T. Areddy says digital currency is the future of money and that China's head start could threaten the U.S. dollar's dominance.
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