Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

The award-winning Curiosity Daily podcast from Curiosity.com will help you get smarter about the world around you — every day. In less than 10 minutes, you’ll get a unique mix of research-based life hacks, the latest science and technology news, and more. Discovery's Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer will help you learn about your mind and body, outer space and the depths of the sea, and how history shaped the world into what it is today.... Show More

Episodes

March 8, 2021 11 min
Learn about the surprising memory skills of infants; why that whole “phosphine on Venus” discovery may not be as exciting as we thought; and how medical science answered Molyneux's problem, a 300-year-old philosophy question.  3-year-olds can recognize a person they met once when they were 1 year old by Kelsey Donk The amazing durability of infant memory: Three-year-olds show recognition of a person they met once at age one. (...
Share
Mark as Played
Learn about why you can’t suffocate by holding your breath; how being angry makes you more likely to believe misinformation; and that time scholars tried to kick Latin out of English, thanks to words like honorificabilitudinitatibus.  Why can't you suffocate by holding your breath? by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Daniel in Beirut) Parkes, M. J. (2005). Breath-holding and its breakpoint. Experimental Physiology, 91(1), ...
Share
Mark as Played
March 4, 2021 13 min
Learn about how quadruple-helix DNA could help us fight cancer; how diversity improves technology, with materials scientist Ainissa Ramirez; and how cats domesticated themselves.  Quadruple-helix DNA exists - and it might be useful for fighting cancers by Cameron Duke Rare quadruple-helix DNA found in living human cells with glowing probes. (2021). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-01/icl-rqd011321.php  Rese...
Share
Mark as Played
Learn about why we still don’t know how eels reproduce and how scientists solved a 150-year-old question about how sandcastles hold together.  We still don't know how eels reproduce by Grant Currin TED-Ed. (2020). No one can figure out how eels have sex - Lucy Cooke [YouTube Video]. In YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFi6ISTjkR4  Epic Eel Migration Mapped for the First Time. (2015, October 27). National Geographic...
Share
Mark as Played
Learn about how to tell when your body is running low on key vitamins; how Neanderthals mourned their dead; and why you should NOT pre-rinse your dishes before putting them in the dishwasher.  Ways Your Body Tells You You're Running Low on Key Vitamins by Stephanie Bucklin Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health, & Division of Laboratory Sciences. (2012). CDC’s Second Nutrition ...
Share
Mark as Played
Learn about a surprising benefit of adding humor to the news; what getting chills from music says about your brain; and how Volta’s electric eels that hunt in packs.  Young adults are more likely to remember and share news delivered with humor by Kelsey Donk New Study Finds that Delivering the News with Humor Makes Young Adults More Likely to Remember and Share | Annenberg School for Communication. (2021). Upenn.edu. https://www.a...
Share
Mark as Played
Learn about an artificial sun that’s hotter than our actual sun; whether math really is a universal language; and what words like “fresh” really tell you about how fancy your food is.  South Korean researchers created an artificial sun that's hotter than our actual sun by Grant Currin Korean artificial sun sets the new world record of 20-sec-long operation at 100 million degrees. (2020, December 24). Phys.org. https://phys.org...
Share
Mark as Played
Learn about how clocks and lightbulbs changed human health, with author and materials scientist Ainissa Ramirez. Plus: learn about that time a bunch of birds became milk bottle thieves and whether you should put one or two spaces after a period. The time a bunch of birds became milk bottle thieves by Cameron Duke Aplin, L. M., Farine, D. R., Morand-Ferron, J., Cockburn, A., Thornton, A., & Sheldon, B. C. (2014). Experimentally...
Share
Mark as Played
February 24, 2021 11 min
Learn about how sleep may have evolved before the brain; why airports keep birds of prey on staff; and what would happen if you stopped time.  Sleep might have evolved before the brain by Cameron Duke Kanaya, H. J., Park, S., Kim, J., Kusumi, J., Krenenou, S., Sawatari, E., Sato, A., Lee, J., Bang, H., Kobayakawa, Y., Lim, C., & Itoh, T. Q. (2020). A sleep-like state in Hydra unravels conserved sleep mechanisms during the evol...
Share
Mark as Played
February 23, 2021 15 min
Learn about what's going on with the new COVID-19 variants — and whether you should worry about them — with Dr. Syra Madad, nationally recognized epidemiologist and the senior director of the pathogens program at NYC Health and Hospitals. Then, learn about a new theory on how our planets formed.  Additional resources from Dr. Syra Madad and #ConqueringCOVID: Official website https://scty.org/syra  Follow @SyraMadad on Twit...
Share
Mark as Played
February 23, 2021 8 min
What gets you curious? Virtual experiences, celestial bodies, water worlds or maybe just the tiniest mysteries inside your brain? The endlessly curious and curiously funny, Gillian Jacobs (Community, Netflix's LOVE) and Diona Reasonover (NCIS), step off set to go on tangents with real-life astronauts, astrophysicists, science artists, mathematician-types and other really smart people that investigate what seems impossible. I...
Share
Mark as Played
Learn about why popular opinion might not be as popular as you thought; a new analysis that’s debunked the blood type diet; and a pool of water in Kidd Creek Mine in Timmins, Ontario, Canada, that’s 2 billion years old.  One person repeating an opinion makes people think it's a popular opinion by Kelsey Donk People Often Think An Opinion Heard Repeatedly From The Same Person Is Actually A Popular Opinion. (2020). ScienceDaily....
Share
Mark as Played
February 19, 2021 13 min
Learn about how Arnold’s ear-cough reflex can make you cough when you clean your ears; why it’s important to teach your kids about giving when they’re learning about money; and a hidden letter in the alphabet that you already sing. Why do I cough when I clean my ears? by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Rachita) Pearce, JMS. (2020, February 19). Arnold’s Nerve - ACNR | Paper & Online Neurology Journal. ACNR | Paper & O...
Share
Mark as Played
Award-winning scientist and science communicator Ainissa Ramirez explains how copper changed our language. Then, learn about the surprising health benefits of brown fat.  Additional resources from Ainissa Ramirez: Pick up "The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another" on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2MyB4l8  Ainissa's website: https://www.ainissaramirez.com/  Ainissa Ramirez on Twitter: https://twitter.c...
Share
Mark as Played
Learn about why just because you want something doesn’t mean you like it; why Esperanto is the world’s most successful universal language; and a gene therapy injection in one eye that improved vision in both.  Just because you want something doesn't mean you like it — and that has implications for addiction by Kelsey Donk Edmonds, D. (2020, December 12). The science of addiction: Do you always like the things you want? BBC New...
Share
Mark as Played
February 16, 2021 12 min
Learn about how hoarders’ brains see their belongings; why dolphins consciously lower their heart rates; and what scientists think happened before the big bang. How Hoarders' Brains See Their Belongings by Ashley Hamer Tolin, D. F., Stevens, M. C., Villavicencio, A. L., Norberg, M. M., Calhoun, V. D., Frost, R. O., Steketee, G., Rauch, S. L., & Pearlson, G. D. (2012). Neural Mechanisms of Decision Making in Hoarding Disord...
Share
Mark as Played
February 15, 2021 11 min
Learn about the “smellicopter,” a drone that can smell via a live moth antenna; why the “Dark Ages” weren’t as dark as you might think; and how simple word swaps can secretly trick your brain.  Introducing Smellicopter: a drone that uses a live moth antenna to smell things by Grant Currin Smellicopter: an obstacle-avoiding drone that uses a live moth antenna to seek out smells. (2020). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_re...
Share
Mark as Played
February 12, 2021 13 min
Learn about whether reading computer code is the same to your brain as reading another language; and a personality trait that could be key to lasting romance. Then, play along at home as we test your podcast knowledge in this month’s edition of Curiosity Challenge trivia. Is computer code the same as language to your brain? by Steffie Drucker To the brain, reading computer code is not the same as reading language. (2020). EurekAle...
Share
Mark as Played
Learn about how having hope for the future could protect you from risky behaviors like drinking and gambling; how your dog’s personality can change over time; and “limnic eruptions” — or, deadly exploding lakes. Having hope for the future could protect you from risky behaviors like drinking and gambling by Kelsey Donk How hope can make you happier with your lot - UEA. (2020, December 16). Uea.Ac.Uk. https://www.uea.ac.uk/news/-/ar...
Share
Mark as Played
Princeton University Anthropology Professor Agustín Fuentes explains why race is a social construct — as in, biological race isn’t real. Then, learn how plants pass down “bad” memories to their offspring through epigenetics.  Additional resources from Agustín Fuentes:  Pick up "Why We Believe: Evolution and the Human Way of Being" from Amazon: https://amzn.to/361ug6j  Pick up "The Creative Spark: How Imagination Made H...
Share
Mark as Played

Chat About Curiosity Daily

Advertise With Us

Popular Podcasts

Black History Month Podcasts
Black History Month Podcasts
We honor Black History Month by highlighting shows that explore icons, change-makers, the history of civil rights, and overall Black voices. Enjoy a moving and inspirational group of podcasts that will expand your knowledge of Black History.
Mommy Doomsday
Mommy Doomsday
The disappearance of two of Lori Vallow’s children in Rexburg, Idaho in September 2019 would expose a bizarre trail of death, devotion and Doomsday beliefs that captivated the nation… A haunting podcast from Keith Morrison and Dateline NBC.
Stuff You Should Know
Stuff You Should Know
If you've ever wanted to know about champagne, satanism, the Stonewall Uprising, chaos theory, LSD, El Nino, true crime and Rosa Parks then look no further. Josh and Chuck have you covered.

For You

    Music, radio and podcasts, all free. Listen online or download the iHeartRadio App.

    Connect

    © 2021 iHeartMedia, Inc.