Dolly Parton Wins The Red-Flag Meme Just Because She Can

By Emily Lee

October 14, 2021

Photo: Getty Images

Over the past few days, you may have noticed your Twitter feed filling up with the red flag emoji. The reason? Twitter users have been sharing their personal "red flags" when they start dating someone new.

It didn't take long before the discussion became a full-blown meme, with users turning the tweet format into hilarious jokes. One such user was Dolly Parton.

After the meme took off earlier this week, the country music star caught wind of it and shared her own personal red flag. "When her beauty is beyond compare with flaming locks of auburn hair," Parton wrote, quoting lyrics from her hit song 'Jolene.' She appropriately added three red flag emojis, as well.

If you aren't familiar with 'Jolene,' the song is about someone pleading with another woman named 'Jolene' not to take her man. In the lyrics, Parton begs: "please don't take him just because you can."

Parton's beloved song has been covered by more than thirty prominent artists over the years, as well, proving how timeless it truly it is. From Miley Cyrus to The White Stripes, these artists have put their own unique spins on the classic country hit. The most recent singer to take a stab at the broken-hearted anthem is Lil Nas X. Fresh off the release of his debut album Montero, he performed a haunting rendition of the track during an appearance in the BBC Live Lounge.

"I was so excited when someone told me that Lil Nas X had done my song [Jolene]. I had to find it and listen to it immediately…and it's really good," Parton wrote on social media of the latest take on her classic hit. "Of course, I love him anyway. I was surprised and I'm honored and flattered. I hope he does good for both of us. Thank you [Lil Nas X.]"

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