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June 24, 2024 39 mins

Today on 2 Pros and a Cup of JoeBrian Noe & Jason Martin fill in for the guys and talk about protesters storming the 18th green at the Travelers Championship, the rivalry between Caitlin Clark & Angel Reese, two Game 7's, and more!

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Speaker 1 (00:00):
Hey, thanks for listening to the Two Pros and a
Cup of Joe podcast with LaVar Arrington, Brady Quinn, and
myself Jonas Knox. Make sure you catch us live weekdays
six to nine am Eastern Time three to six am
Pacific on Fox Sports Radio. You can find your local
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show over at Foxsports Radio dot com, or stream us

(00:22):
live every day on the iHeartRadio app by searching FSR.

Speaker 2 (00:32):
You're listening to Fox Sports Radio.

Speaker 3 (00:38):
Man, we had some chaos yesterday. That is not an understatement.
We'll get to that. Hey, just a minute. We are
broadcasting live from the tierrack dot com studios tirac dot com.

Speaker 4 (00:49):
We'll help get you there.

Speaker 3 (00:50):
An unmatched selection, fast, free shipping, free road hazard protection
over ten thousand recommended installers tiraq dot com. The Way
tire Buying should be. Morning to you, Jason martin In
for Two Pros and a Cup of Joe?

Speaker 4 (01:03):
Everything good with you? Anything I need to be aware
of here?

Speaker 3 (01:06):
Did you turn a completely heavy metal since the last
time we did a show together.

Speaker 1 (01:12):
No.

Speaker 5 (01:13):
I had a little bit of a leg surgery about
a week ago. Little bit hold on a little bit
of a no no, no, no, nothing nothing massive. But
I've still I've still got a little bit of recovering
that I'm kind of doing. So I'm sort of I've
got my leg up right now while I'm doing the show.
So that's I guess that's probably the only thing I'm
playing hurt. I don't I don't need to ward or anything,

(01:33):
but I certainly will accept, you know, some kind of
sympathy trophy, money, whatever you want to do, I'll give
you my venmo.

Speaker 3 (01:41):
Yeah, I'm gonna circle back to this because I am
so curious what the whole situation is. But we're going
to dive in to begin the show with the chaos
that was at the Travelers Championship. We're talking golf at
the beginning, because it was the eighteenth hole, so this
is the last hole of the tournament of the day,

(02:02):
and you had six protesters slash yahoos run onto the
course and we had some like kind of smoke bombs
going on there and they left some red and white residue.
Six people were arrested. They were all released on five
thousand dollars bond. But this was crazy, Like I look

(02:24):
at that incident and I just rolled my eyes and
I sort of had the reaction that Scotty Scheffler had,
where Scotty Scheffler just looks and he kind of smiles
and he's like, Oh, these jackasses, you know. But I
stopped and I thought, and I'm like, man, it could
be so much worse than that. And we've seen some
incidents over the years in sports where I hate to
be so grim to start the show, but think of

(02:47):
Monica Sellis in nineteen ninety three, the tennis player who
was stabbed by a crazed fan and she's only nineteen
years old. She had to leave the sport for two
years because of physical and emotional damage. And you could
chronicle many different incidents. I'm surprised more stuff like this
doesn't happen. I'm just glad it was pretty mild yesterday

(03:07):
and these yahoos, some of them were wearing shirts that
said no golf on a dead planet. And so you
can grasp where it's going as far as that goes.

Speaker 5 (03:18):
Yeah, was it last week? Climate protesters did this to
stone Hinge? They went to Stone Hinge and started spray
painting it. Yeah, And kind of interesting that a lot
of times this involves spray paint for people that are
protesting the climate. I think that Apita and climate protesters,

(03:41):
unless you are one, and maybe even if you are one,
no one likes these people like this. This kind of
thing is so ridiculous, And yes, it has happened here
and there at sporting events. I do think in golf
in particular, I remember going to Firestone years ago in
Acron and standing like eighteen inches away from Tiger Woods

(04:06):
and a foot away from Bubba Watson and all these
guys all day long. It just felt like I was
way too close. It felt like my access should not
have been that close to golfers. And it's kind of
like that, like the fact that you could run onto
a golf course and do this, it seems like it
shouldn't be doable. But I'm surprised it doesn't happen all
the time, only because it takes one person who's had

(04:26):
one too many drinks to do something like this, and
you have such close access. It seems like like, I
don't think the rope is going to stop me from
getting over, right if I want to get over So
you're right, like, this is a scary situation. Accept It
just turned out to be a bunch of idiots doing
idiotic things. And if you actually, like look at some

(04:47):
of the things that they were saying. I guess a
couple of the protesters and what they were asking for
even that didn't make sense, which should surprise no one
because there's no logic in what they're doing at all.

Speaker 4 (04:57):
Yeah, that's where my mind goes.

Speaker 3 (04:59):
It's a lot like you, Jason, where you've heard this
many times over the years. If something happens at say
someone runs under the field that the Super Bowl, or
something random happens. Remember the incident years ago at a
White Sox game where a Royals first base coach was
attacked by two fans. They just ran out of the

(05:20):
crowd and started beating them up. And you'll always hear
this is well, security just has to do a better job.
And I always think like, unless you have the reaction
time of an NFL middle linebacker as a security guy, like,
you're not gonna stop these incidents. You are right there,
like you said, your access if you decide in a

(05:42):
split second to just run out and do something, you
can do it. If you're at an NBA game, MLB golf,
what have you. Your access is right there and so
when I hear these, well, security just got to step
it up, man, they can't allow this sort of thing
to happen. Good luck with them, and I'm just thankful
it hasn't been worse. And yesterday is the same thing.

(06:05):
It was one of those you just roll your eyes
and say, okay. It was a five minute delay on
the eighteenth hole, and because there was a playoff that
was forced. Tom Kim forced the playoff with Scotti Scheffler,
they had to move the hole on the eighteenth green.
They recut where the hole was because the protesters damaged

(06:26):
the green they had the smoke bombs or whatever they had,
so they had to move the hole and then have
that playoff on the eighteenth.

Speaker 4 (06:35):
It was just a bizarre scene yesterday.

Speaker 5 (06:37):
Yeah, it was. I mean, if you look at a
gallery like that, that point about security being better, like you
think about somebody running on the field of a football
game or an NBA game or golf. You look at
that gallery yesterday. Even if you do have split second
reflex timing, you've got to be in the exact right spot,
like if you happen to be looking at a different grouping,

(06:58):
like if you were over here on the right and
the thing have at the left, and you're the one
that happens to see it, it's still not going to
be enough. Like you're way out manned if you're a
security guy in that scenario. I don't know what the
actual ratio would be, but it's not in your favor.
So I do think that it's kind of it's over
simplistic and unreasonable to just say, oh, well, the security's

(07:20):
got to stop this every time. It's like, no that
sometimes this stuff is just going to happen. And I
think your point from a couple of minutes ago is
really good in that it is surprising that we haven't
had a whole lot of this kind of thing that
is more catastrophic as opposed to just nuisance oriented or

(07:40):
some guy that decides to streak onto the field that
the camera gets off him, you never see him. He
gets tackled and that's the end of it. Like, it
does feel like we should have had some kind of
really terrible stuff happen through the years and we don't.
Which is it is it's kind of miraculous.

Speaker 3 (07:57):
Yeah, it's I just think of it where where you know,
if you run onto the field during a football game
and you're trying to harm someone, if it's the NFL,
good luck, right Like, you're probably going to be the
one who's harmed. But you go to a golf tournament
and right like, some of these golfers, not exactly they

(08:17):
don't look like, you know, ray Lewis out there or
whoever you want to choose in the NFL, you know
what I mean, Like, they aren't imposing figures. If you
wanted to go out there and you know, tackle ok,
Shay Batilla or something. I think I weigh twice as
much as Batilla out there. I'm just guessing, you know,
he's a stick figure. So I just hope that nothing

(08:40):
crazy error happens going forward. But yeah, I think we
look at fans a lot of times were like these
idiots and what they yell, and sometimes it's completely inappropriate,
and we tend to look at it from that perspective.
But yesterday shifted my thought process where it's like, and
I'm surprised that hasn't been way crazier. You compare, Jason,

(09:04):
some of these things that happened in soccer worldwide, where
literally there are flayers being shot at the players on
the pitch and imagine if that just happened at a
Dallas Cowboys game. You know, like the sports world would
halt in this country where you're like, what just happened?
And so it's one of those things where I think

(09:25):
that we got to look at the positive side to
a degree where crazier things haven't happened, because I guarantee
you this if there was the same access. Oh, it
just popped in my head. Remember from the last dance
where they were talking about Phil Jackson in his earlier
coaching days and he was coaching abroad somewhere and the

(09:50):
game got stopped because the crowd like attacked the officials
or something like that. It was just a very minor
part in the last dance, But it's like that stuff
is not abnormal. That happens in other countries and other
sporting events at times, and so I'm glad it just
hasn't gotten out of control. But that's where we're at,

(10:12):
Jason is I think that the fans and the protesters
and the crazy lunatics, it's in their hands right because
to stop them from doing that.

Speaker 4 (10:24):
Good luck.

Speaker 3 (10:24):
You're just really hoping you can do as much as possible,
but it ultimately the decision lies with them. That's a
scary thought, man, It definitely is.

Speaker 5 (10:34):
It's just good that you know, ninety nine percent of
these incidents have been just knuckleheads doing things like gluing
their hand to the court in Flushing Meadows years ago
or something like that. Like the fact that it hasn't
been serious, I do think is worthy of mention and
worthy of I mean, you would love to think there's

(10:54):
some kind of fix, but there's never going to be
a perfect fix for this. If you have a public event,
there's always going to be some degree of risk. And
the fact that generally, outside of the Cells incident and
a few of the soccer incidents and things like that,
most of this has just been a nuisance rather than
some kind of giant news story is a that's that's

(11:15):
a net positive for sports.

Speaker 3 (11:17):
Yeah, absolutely, all right, We've got plenty to do over here.
We got ball on the menu, of course, meaning football, right,
I think everybody, not everybody does know that, you know,
we've we've.

Speaker 4 (11:29):
Talked about that before.

Speaker 3 (11:30):
Jason.

Speaker 4 (11:31):
By the way, is ball is it ball in your
in your world over there?

Speaker 5 (11:35):
Meaning football? Yeah, for sure, But I mean I usually
would just say football, but actually through the years hosting
with you, off and on, You've always said ball and
you always mean football. So now I know, like, I
know your jargon, I know where you're gonna go with it.
And so now when I hear ball, I do immediately
think football.

Speaker 3 (11:54):
But Jason, normally you would think basketball, right or baseball?

Speaker 5 (11:58):
I kind of would at this time.

Speaker 6 (12:01):
I mean, just in general. If somebody were to say,
like ball.

Speaker 5 (12:04):
Don't try to convert him bad, I would just say
ball is more like Okay, you know what, Coope makes
a valid point here. I do think that when I
hear ball, like in shorthand, I think the first inclination
is to think basketball.

Speaker 4 (12:20):
You know, but I'm glad that you no longer think
that way.

Speaker 5 (12:22):
You you have kind of converted me to Okay, there
is shorthand for football, even though I don't really have
a problem just saying football every time.

Speaker 3 (12:31):
By the way, real fast, I don't want to bury
the league because I said I would circle back to it.
What happened your leg minor surgery on your leg? I
need to know the story.

Speaker 5 (12:39):
Yeah, I mean surgery, said I had. I had a
couple veins ripped out of my leg.

Speaker 4 (12:45):
Okay, well you're wrestling a wolverine over there. Whatever.

Speaker 5 (12:50):
No, it's just it was it was something that that
I needed to get done for just long term health things,
and this was the time to do it. So I
went ahead and did it. And like I said, it's fine,
just got got put under for a little while and
had a quick procedure and have just kind of had to.
I haven't been able to lift anything over thirty pounds,

(13:11):
and I have to. I think I'm that clear to
do that now. But my daughter, my older daughter, my
three year old, has pushed out a little bit because
she's over thirty pounds and she doesn't really care that
I can't lift anything over thirty pounds. She's still trying
to fight me wrestleing. I mean, she was basically on
the eighteenth green on me yesterday. So that's just kind
of that's just kind of how it is.

Speaker 3 (13:31):
I still knocked that, but in though she didn't have
a shirt that said no golf on a dead plan.

Speaker 5 (13:37):
No dead on a dead on a dead Yeah.

Speaker 4 (13:39):
Right, yeah, that's right. Oh man, that's good. Okay, we
got a lot to get to right around the corner.

Speaker 3 (13:48):
I don't think it's as much about race as it
is about entertainment value. We'll lay that out for you.
He's Jason Martin. I'm Brian No. We're in for Two
Pros and a Cup of Joe right here on Fox
Sports Radio.

Speaker 7 (14:00):
Sure to catch live editions of Two Pros and a
Cup of Joe with Brady Quinn, LeVar Errington, and Jonas
Knox weekdays at six am Eastern three am Pacific on
Fox Sports Radio and the iHeartRadio App.

Speaker 4 (14:14):
Hey, what's up everybody?

Speaker 8 (14:15):
It's me three time pro bowler LeVar Arrington and I
couldn't be more excited to announce a podcast called Up
on Game?

Speaker 5 (14:22):
What is Up on Game?

Speaker 4 (14:23):
You asked, along with my fellow pro bowler TJ.

Speaker 8 (14:26):
Hutschman, Zada and Super Bowl champion Yup, that's right, Plexico Birds.

Speaker 4 (14:31):
You can only name a show with that type of
talent on it.

Speaker 8 (14:35):
Up on Game We're going to be sharing our real
life experiences loaded with teachable moments. Listen to Up on
Game with Me LeVar Arrington, TJ. Hutchman, Zada and Plexico
Birds on the iHeartRadio app, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you
get your podcast from.

Speaker 3 (14:55):
It is Fox Sports Radio. He's Jason Martin. I'm Brian
no In for two pros and a cup of Joe here.
So we had some WNBA action yesterday again, we had
the third installment of the WNBA rivalry, which is Angel
Reese and Caitlin Clark. The Chicago Sky got to win, Jason,

(15:18):
so Angel Reese she's now got her first win against
Caitlin Clark in the WNBA. Caitlyn has a two to
one record. But the Sky beat the Fever yesterday. And look,
Angel Reese played great. She had twenty five point sixteen rebounds,
had a great game. A big bucket in the final minute.

(15:39):
Was that you, Jason or is that a week from mute?

Speaker 4 (15:41):
Okay?

Speaker 3 (15:41):
I didn't know if that was from it was a
SoundBite or a human being. Yeah, that's yeah, one of
those things. I was like, man, j Mart's excited here
For a second, I thought this really stood out to me. Jason,
I'm curious where you stand on this. But Caitlin Clark
just plays a more entertaining, entertaining style of basketball.

Speaker 4 (16:00):
Like a lot of.

Speaker 3 (16:01):
This has been turned into something much more complicated than
it needs to be, which is, oh, what is this
all of this hype and you know, all these flowers
being thrown at Caitlin Clark. Clark's feet have something to
do with race and YadA YadA. It's like, it's way
more simple in my mind than that. I think that

(16:24):
Angel Reese is a good basketball player, she doesn't play
as entertaining of a style. She's largely a rebounder. She'll
get some close range buckets from time to time. But
Caitlyn Clark's bombing threes, that's more interesting.

Speaker 4 (16:38):
I'd rather watch Steph Curry hit threes than watch Rudy Gobert.

Speaker 3 (16:42):
Rebound, you know what I mean, Like, if you think
that it's more exciting to watch Jared Allen of the
Calves like crab twelve rebounds compared to Damian Lillard hit
logo threes, we just have different versions of what's entertaining,
and so I think a large part of it is
that is just stylistically, Caitlin Clark plays an entertain, entertaining

(17:06):
brand of basketball, and that feels a lot of her popularity.
I don't know why that's so hard to understand for
some people.

Speaker 5 (17:12):
I mean, I definitely think that's part of it. I mean,
I'd rather watch Steph than Ben Wallace, and that I
think is what Aaron Torres compared my partner on Saturday nights.
I think that's who he compared Angel Reese a little
bit too in terms of her game and stuff. But yeah,
twenty five and sixteen. The one thing that they do
need in the w is for someone like, if there's

(17:33):
going to be a rivalry, the other person has to
be pretty good. And I don't know what Angel Reese
is going to be like throughout a career, but twenty
five and sixteen, with probably a pretty decent audience watching
that game, like for their standards, I would say that's
a net plus. And surprisingly enough, you didn't have like
that moment where Angel Reese is trying to drift off

(17:57):
of you know, the NASCAR winning car of Caitlin Clark
and doing something to stay relevant. She actually stay relevant
with what you did on the floor. Yeah, and that's
a positive, you know. I think there's different levels of
where some of this comes from in terms of the popularity.
I think you're right, she does have the step effect.
She does have it. I mean you saw it yesterday.

(18:19):
She was you know, more assist than scoring in a
lot of respects yesterday, but her assists were very good
and she's an excellent passer, so that's another thing to travel.
She's a flashy passer in addition to a fast paced
player who drains threes from thirty feet if she has to,
and that's always I think gonna be exciting even now

(18:41):
in an era where we see way too many threes
in my opinion, And now I've become a commugeon who
believes the three point line should just almost be erased
to see whether or not we get back to actually
playing fundamental basketball on all levels. But I think it's
different when you talk about why she's popular and then
why she is And I don't care what they say

(19:02):
why they don't like her in the w n b
A because I think there are there's different answers to
those questions. But your point is valid in terms of
why she's popular. I think a large part of that
doesn't have to do with, you know, her race or
or those kinds of factors, has to do with her
brand of basketball, right well.

Speaker 3 (19:20):
I mean, I think compare her to other white w
NBA players from the past, whether it's Diana Tarassi or
Rebecca Lobo, or you could go on and on with
stars that were never as big of stars as Caitlin
Clark is, and you ask yourself, why is it?

Speaker 5 (19:37):
Well, it's not the.

Speaker 3 (19:38):
Race card, right, they're white, but they weren't as popular.

Speaker 5 (19:42):
Why is that?

Speaker 3 (19:43):
Well, stylistically, their games weren't the same. Again, she hit
five threes yesterday. This was a small portion of a
call from Ryan Ruco on ESPN.

Speaker 5 (19:58):
A logo three.

Speaker 3 (19:58):
I'm with you where listen If we're talking NBA and
they're jacking up threes team wise, it's tough to watch
thirty five forty threes being tossed up there and they
hit maybe twenty five percent on an off night.

Speaker 4 (20:12):
You know that's not enjoyable.

Speaker 5 (20:13):
Bad's that's awful basketball to watch, really entertaining it all.

Speaker 4 (20:17):
It's tough. It's a tough watch. But if you watch whoever.

Speaker 3 (20:21):
It is in the NBA, if it's Damian Lillard or
Steph Curry or Kyrie Irving some of the threes that
he hits, Luca in his step backs, if you see
a proficient three point shooter, it's exciting. It does make
you say wow, especially with the logo range with Caitlin
or some of the NBA players.

Speaker 4 (20:39):
It's a wow. It's not a wow to see.

Speaker 3 (20:43):
Angel rees did the dirty work and grabbed an offensive rebound.
You know, it's it's just different levels of entertainment value.
And I love what you said about the NASCAR comparison.
That is beautiful right there where Angel sometimes does use
Caitlin to try a sling shot past her on the
final lap, and yesterday she didn't have to do that.

(21:05):
She played so well. Props to her. But I don't
think we can gloss over that. If you're looking, it's
turned into like Caitlin Clark has been reduced to as
she's a white girl and that's why she's so popular,
And it's like, are you serious right in now? Look
at her game stylistically and she is the most prolific
scorer in college basketball history, Like, how can we still

(21:26):
be talking solely about race?

Speaker 4 (21:28):
That doesn't make sense to me at all.

Speaker 5 (21:31):
Yeah, I mean I think that's that's just bringing it
down to the wrong place. I mean, I'm sure that
there is a factor in that, just in some fans,
But I don't think that most people look at Caitlin
Clark can see that. I don't think that most people,
just most fans, because she never made it a thing.
It's not like they look at it and see her
sexuality and see that she's you know, a heterosexual. But

(21:53):
I do think, like I said, I think there's a difference.
And I said this on Saturday night on my show
with Anon Torres, and I was going to be kind
of careful about it, and it was just kind of like, well,
I just think it just I think it's fair to
say this. I think that one of the biggest issues
for Caitlin Clark as it relates to the league itself,
is that she does not bring with her the ability

(22:16):
to share the message they want shared because of I
think that. I think, let me just ask you a
hypothetical question and you can punt on it or just
feel free not to answer it, but I think it's valid.
What do you think the feeling is in the WNBA
amidst her contemporaries, amidst other players and some of this

(22:41):
vitrio and all that. What do you think the difference
is if she's gay and not straight.

Speaker 3 (22:46):
That's a really interesting question, you know what. My honest
answer is, it would be different, but I don't think
it would be as different as some would anticipate. I
think most of this is fueled not because ah Man
this straight girl. I think it's fueled from why is
she getting all this attention?

Speaker 5 (23:06):
Right?

Speaker 3 (23:06):
And so that would still be the same whether she's
gay or straight. She's just getting a lot of attention
and a lot of players, if you listen to their comments,
it's all like, why is she getting all this shine
and we're not. There's more to the WNBA than just
one player. You've literally heard Angel Reese say those exact

(23:27):
words you've heard her say, I want people to know
they're watching because of me and not just one player.
Of course, he's talking about Caitlin Clark. So I think
most of this has been fueled by we should be
getting attention too, not just her. And I don't think
that changes at all with her sexual orientation.

Speaker 5 (23:47):
Well I can understand that to an extent, but she's
she's the face of the league, Okay. I don't think
there's any question about that. She's the most popular athlete
by a wide margin, that they've ever had in the WNBA.
She might be the first one you look at and
say she's truly marketable. There's a maybe a smattering of

(24:07):
others that had some degree of potential and they've gone
on to show that, Yes, I mean there's charisma there,
there's talent there, like a Candas Parker for example. She's
great on TV, just a lot of ability and a
multifaceted person in Kandas Parker, But no one is close
to the supernova level of popularity that you look at
when you think of Caitlin Clark, and she's the standard

(24:30):
bearer for the WNBA, and I don't think that they
look at it from a talent perspective. I think they
say she's not the one that's supposed to be the
face of this league. And I think there is something
to it. I think that she has a few characteristics
about her that make her the wrong messenger for what

(24:50):
they want. I think that's a shame. But I think
it's a factor. Maybe it's not the biggest factor. I
don't know. I believe it is a significant contributor to
the perception of her because what these other women are
arguing about, why are you just caring about this now
and we've been here for three four years. It's like, right,

(25:11):
but you mentioned it yourself. You talked about the entertaining
brand of basketball that Caitlin Clark brings. That's certainly part
of it. And the story that kind of took a
life of its own against Angel Rees last year, not
this year, but last year in the NCAA Tournament. But
a lot of this is just I may not be
an expert on basketball, and that's why I don't like

(25:31):
when people tell me I need to pay attention to
this analyst and this analyst that I've been watching this
league for a long time. I don't have to know
basketball to know entertainment. I don't have to know the
intricacies of the women's game to know whether or not
that's a good viewing experience, and historically it has not been,
and honestly, it's still is not. And that's why I

(25:54):
don't think you have a league. You have Caitlyn Clark
versus insert name here. That's generally what you got. And
Angel Reese, to her credit, I think, quietly understands that
she can kind of drift off this. That's why I
used that NASCAR analogy earlier. That's why. And she recognizes

(26:14):
that because it works for her in the past, and
so she's actually trying to create something so that now, oh, well,
Angel Reese and Caitlin Clark are playing that's different than
Caitlin Clark versus anybody else. And again, to her credit,
I think she understands that there is entertainment in all
of this, and so she's soaking it up.

Speaker 4 (26:33):
Yeah.

Speaker 3 (26:35):
You know, it's interesting because this was something that Angel
Reese said earlier this month about the WNBA, and of
course alluding to Caitlin Clark.

Speaker 5 (26:45):
I'll look back at.

Speaker 1 (26:45):
Twenty years and be like, yeah, the reason why we're
watching women's basketball is not just because of one person.
It's because of me too, and I want you.

Speaker 4 (26:51):
To realize that.

Speaker 3 (26:52):
Okay, right, So she's obviously talking about Angel Reese. I'm sorry,
we'll talking about Kaitlyn Clark. But Angel Reese is straight,
you know what I mean. So this isn't fueled by
this straight girl, Caitlyn Clark. It's not fueled by that
at all. And Angel Reese has been the most outspoken
against Caitlyn Clark and she has the rivalry with her,

(27:16):
and that isn't fueled at all by Caitlyn Clark's sexual orientation.

Speaker 4 (27:21):
So I don't think it would change that much.

Speaker 3 (27:23):
I think most of this isn't fueled by well, Caitlin straight,
it's Caitlyn is getting all this shine and a lot
of players are like, why am I not getting attention?

Speaker 4 (27:35):
Why is this only about her? And it turns into
that largely.

Speaker 3 (27:38):
I think your question is excellent, and I do think
for some it would change it a bit. Let's just
say Caitlin Clark is gay, and it probably wouldn't be
as negative with fellow players. But I don't think that
would just all go away and vanish if she's still
getting all my nights.

Speaker 5 (27:56):
Okay, so it might not all right. What I really
said this weekend was you can be one of the
two things that she happens to be, but being both
of them can be a bigger problem if you want
to be the face of the league. Because we've had
a lot of you know, very talented white women that
have played in the WNBA, Sue Bird for example. The

(28:18):
list goes on and on. The vast majority of them
also are gay. So let's just take it the other
just from the flip side again, I'm just asking how
hypothetical questions about how she's perceived within the league amongst teammates.
This isn't a fan this isn't a fan comment or
anything like that. If Caitlyn Clark were still straight but black, Okay,
so she's Angel Reese at this point. Do you think

(28:40):
it's the same, because I don't. I think there is
the fact that she happens to be both of those
two things. She fits into both of those two categories.
I think that makes them grit their teeth at her
because she is not going to again be able to
deliver the message she's the wrong person to carry the
flag because there are different things about that leak that

(29:02):
they want pushed. There's an ideology I think in their
brains and in their hearts that they want push that
she's not gonna push. And I mean, look at how
often you know they are attempting to bait her and
she her only response is every time she has to
take the high road. And I think she knows it
because if she does anything else, they're going to use
it against her. I feel like, so she's just not

(29:24):
giving them any rooms. She's just basically dropping hot coals
on them every time by taking the high road to saying,
oh yeah, it's fine, I as a basketball play, you
know whatever like that, and just moving on from it.
I think there is more to it. And if you
look at just if you look at how it's gone
for her in the league, right, and how many people
are doing something that seems a little bit more to

(29:47):
her and then complaining when someone notices it. To me,
there is at least a substantial degree of vitriol coming
to her from the league because she doesn't represent what
they can would like for their standard bearer to represent.

Speaker 3 (30:02):
I don't buy it. I don't, and I'll tell you why.
Let's play the what if game super fast? Okay, and
you've played the game, and I like it is a
what if she was gay? At what would be the
feeling around the league? Maybe at times there would be
less vitriol?

Speaker 4 (30:19):
Okay, I buy that. What if she was black?

Speaker 3 (30:22):
Okay, maybe there'd be a little bit less vitriol if
that happened. Possibly, what if she wasn't uber popular? It
would be completely different. That's what I feel like is
fueling the most part of this negativity is let's just
say she's you know, she's talked about, but she isn't

(30:43):
just drooled over it, oh, Caitlin klok she's not selling
out arenas and all this stuff. I think that would
change it the most. So I think the negativity is
mostly fueled by she's just so uber popular, and most
of these players they're thick and tired of it.

Speaker 5 (31:01):
I think that. I mean, I get I get that,
I get that, And my last comment would just be
given that right, given her popularity, that's where if she
were some things that she is not one in particular,
I think. I think that's where it is. Like one
of the things about Kaitlyn Clark is before we didn't
even know what her orientation was because it was never

(31:23):
really a thing. We didn't know about it at Iowa
and it's only kind of come to the four in
the last couple of months. I've seen some articles written
and things like that about it. So it wasn't a
real big factor and it's never It's really never to
be in terms of just the general talk about Caitlin Clark,
and I think that's it. I think she's not going

(31:44):
to go out there. It doesn't feel like and defend.
She's not gonna go to the Meghan Rapino route. Does
that make sense?

Speaker 4 (31:51):
Yeah? No, Yeah, I think.

Speaker 5 (31:53):
That's That's where I'm coming from, is they would rather
have an activist, I feel like, be their big star
that's a fire only a breakaway star. The fact that
she's popular adds to it because she can't then spread
the message that they would like spread.

Speaker 7 (32:08):
Be sure to catch live editions of Two Pros and
a Cup of Joe with Brady Quinn, LeVar Errington, and
Jonas Knox weekdays at six am Eastern, three am Pacific.

Speaker 3 (32:18):
You know, Eddie, I don't want to make you hate
me here, and I don't know that this would make
you hate me. But you hear this all the time.
I want you to weigh in on this too, Jason Martin.
The two best words in sports, right, A lot of
people in Game seven. We got Game seven tonight in hockey. Untrue.
The two best words in sports are super bowld Okay,

(32:39):
that's what they are. The two second best words in
sports are Game seven, and those are two great words, great, fantastic.
Not as great as Super Bowl. No, I would disagree,
though I disagree too, Yeah, me too, you guys games, Kevin,
because so many Super Bowls, I guess I'm old enough.

Speaker 5 (32:56):
I'm actually I've never figured out how old. Eddie Garcia
is a box, but I grew up with the Super
Bowl stinking year after year after year after year after year.
In terms of a great event. You want to talk
about money, and marketing and all that. Yeah, but I
get much more excited, honestly, for Game seven than just
any individual Super Bowl. Like, I mean, we're gonna have

(33:18):
two champions crowned in sports hockey, and we're gonna have
a College World Series champion.

Speaker 6 (33:23):
Brian who drinks the NFL kool aid. They can anything
they do, and he just thinks it's the greatest thing
in the Oh yeah.

Speaker 5 (33:29):
It's just me. Okay. So are we gonna be that
Patriots Rams super Bowl? That was a bear? That was
a great one.

Speaker 3 (33:35):
Are we gonna have like one hundred and ten million
people watching Game seven tonight of the Stanley Cup Final?

Speaker 6 (33:42):
They should be?

Speaker 5 (33:43):
Are ten million? Do one hundred and ten million people?
Make it? The greatest words in sports or just the
most valuable words in sports.

Speaker 4 (33:51):
The greatest, the two greatest worlds.

Speaker 9 (33:54):
You're you're you're the person that works on the football crap?
That's the Hall of Games. Yes, that's garbage. You I mean,
who would waste their time watching that? And yet you
and a lot of people do. It's nonsense. Have some
value to your time.

Speaker 4 (34:08):
How did the you know what the Hall of Fame game?

Speaker 3 (34:11):
I would like to see the ratings as crazy as
it is for the Hall of Fame game versus some
Game sevens.

Speaker 4 (34:17):
Seriously, but that's.

Speaker 9 (34:19):
Not the point. The point is having value in what
you don't. Don't just be a zombie and just take
whatever they feed you, because this is the opposite.

Speaker 5 (34:29):
No zombies.

Speaker 4 (34:30):
The zombie take is two greatest words in sport.

Speaker 2 (34:33):
No, No, that's.

Speaker 5 (34:34):
What I mean.

Speaker 9 (34:35):
Nobody's watching a Game seven of a preseason series. They're
watching a ton of championship.

Speaker 5 (34:40):
Yeah, tons of people, tons of No, a ton of
people went and saw Transformers movies a sense of trash.
A lot of people went and saw Fifty Shades of Gray.
Pretty sure that was an embarrassment of a movie. It
made more money than a lot of other movies did.
Just because it makes a ton more money or has
a ton more eyeballs doesn't mean it's the greatest. It
can mean it's the most lucrative. But those are two

(35:02):
different things.

Speaker 3 (35:03):
Well, fine, it's lucrative. It's got the ratings. Do you
have Super Bowl parties? I mean for Game sevens, you're
gonna have a party tonight. You're gonna invite everybody over,
You're gonna do a big thing. No, you're not because
no one does, right, They only do that for the
super Bowl because if but.

Speaker 9 (35:18):
Most people who go to those parties don't care about
the Super Bowl. They're there for the party, Okay, They're
there for the food, there for the drink. They're watching
stupid commercials more than they watch the game.

Speaker 3 (35:27):
Yeah, okay, Well you guys, enjoy your Game seven, and
I'll be watching it too. I'm excited for it. I'm
excited for puck tonight. But it's not the two greatest
words in sports. When you stop and think about it,
you tell me in your heart of hearts, everybody listening,
don't be influenced by the riff raff on the other
side over here, right, like, which are you more excited for?

Speaker 4 (35:47):
Is it a Super Bowl matchup?

Speaker 3 (35:48):
You're more excited for the Game seven and hockey tonight?

Speaker 4 (35:52):
Or was it you know, chiefs forty nine ers?

Speaker 3 (35:55):
You tell me what you're more excited for. What was
more entertainment value for you? And we've had some awesome
Super Bowls over the last twenty years.

Speaker 4 (36:04):
More times than that they've been dramatic games, and you've
had some dog Game seven's as well. I'm on a
tangent over here. You know I will not.

Speaker 6 (36:12):
Stand for this old man yelling at the clouds.

Speaker 4 (36:15):
I'm just saying, which.

Speaker 3 (36:18):
Three to one on this shows all close minded folks
who are zombies, who have followed the herd that you
know your cheap over.

Speaker 6 (36:28):
Can't wait for that Hall of Fame game?

Speaker 4 (36:31):
Where did the Hall of Fame game come in?

Speaker 9 (36:33):
And we're talking, you're talking all we explained it to you.
We're not listening. They gets good ratings, but who would
spend their time watching that garbage of a bunch of.

Speaker 5 (36:41):
Guys are Fame game?

Speaker 4 (36:43):
It's a super talk.

Speaker 6 (36:45):
About people who don't have selective viewing. You know, Uh,
I don't know what the word is. I'm trying to
fight here, but have some You.

Speaker 5 (36:55):
Know you've broken Eddie Garcia with your awful tank. Brian,
it's on point.

Speaker 6 (37:01):
Don't just eat whatever they give you.

Speaker 3 (37:03):
The super Bowl is way bigger, way better than any
game seven ever, it's a bigger event. It's twenty times
bigger than any game sex.

Speaker 9 (37:14):
It's it's a bigger event. Yeah, I agree with that.
It doesn't mean it's better though.

Speaker 3 (37:19):
All right, you guys will be in the wrong. It's okay,
it's fine. There's nothing wrong with that all right, come
it up next. Why lie when you're caught red handed?
We'll get to that. He's Jason Martin, I'm Brian not.
We're in for two pros and a cup of joe
right here on Fox Sports Radio.

Speaker 2 (37:33):
Fox Sports Radio has the best sports talk lineup in
the nation. Catch all of our shows at foxsports Radio
dot com and within the iHeartRadio app. Search FSR to
listen live. It is Fox Sports Radio. He's Jason Martin,
I'm Brian know. We're in for two pros and a
cup of Joe. So Eddie Garcia mentioned this a few

(37:53):
minutes ago. Edwin Diaz, YEP, closer for the Mets. He
was entering in.

Speaker 3 (37:59):
The ninth inning, gonna nail down a win against the Cubs,
at least try to. And it wasn't allowed to pitch
sticky stuff. Got a sticky stuff violation.

Speaker 4 (38:10):
Over here, Jason.

Speaker 3 (38:11):
Now, this is after the game what Edwin Diaz had
to say about it. And it wasn't yeah, you know,
I did it. It was the opposite.

Speaker 5 (38:19):
Check this out. What was the explanation that you were
giving buying damnpire.

Speaker 10 (38:23):
I just say I used the same thing always rock
rossing sweat and I put my hand on the there
a little bit because I need to grab had some
grive on the ball. So that's what I was planning
to them. But they said, what to much steak? I understood,
But at the end of the day, I was using
rug rossing sweat and put my hand on the dirt.

Speaker 4 (38:44):
Okay.

Speaker 3 (38:44):
So he says it was just rosin, sweat and dirt.
Vic Kara Kara Poza. He's the crew chief for last
night's game. He said this, Jason, he said, it definitely
wasn't rosin and sweat. We've checked thousands of these. I
know what the feeling is. This was very sticky. So

(39:05):
I don't why light through your teeth. He did something illegal.
They know he did something illegal. It doesn't help his
cause going forward. It just makes him a liar. You're
better off to being like, eh, you know I got busted.
What can I tell you?

Speaker 5 (39:17):
I mean, is it at all possible he is telling
the truth.

Speaker 3 (39:25):
I don't believe so No, Like they check hands gloves
all the time. He's like, they just invented this and
mistook it for rosin and sweat.

Speaker 4 (39:34):
You could see it on his hand, like it's caked
on his hand.

Speaker 5 (39:39):
Well, if he was lying, then it was a bad
lie because they he still got suspended for ten games.

Speaker 3 (39:44):
Yeah, yeah, be suspended on top of lying. But hey,
much more to come. Jason leading the ship next hour
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