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June 23, 2024 32 mins

Maller & Danny G. have Mail Bag fun for your Sunday! All questions sent in by new listeners & P1's of the #MallerMilitia! Download, subscribe, and remember that sharing is caring (unless it's an STD.) Follow Danny G. @DannyGradio and Ben on Twitter @BenMaller and listen to the original terrestrial radio edition of "Ben Maller Show," Monday-Friday on Fox Sports Radio, 2a-6a ET, 11p-3a PT!

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Episode Transcript

Available transcripts are automatically generated. Complete accuracy is not guaranteed.
Speaker 1 (00:00):
Cutbooms.

Speaker 2 (00:02):
If you thought four hours a day, twelve hundred minutes
a week was enough, think again. He's the last remnants
of the Old Republic, a soul fashion of fairness. He
treats crackheads in the ghetto gutter the same as the
rich pill poppers in the penthouse.

Speaker 1 (00:18):
Wow.

Speaker 2 (00:18):
The Clearinghouse of Hot takes break free for something special.
The Fifth Hour with Ben Maller starts right now.

Speaker 3 (00:28):
In the air.

Speaker 1 (00:31):
Everyway and welcome to the Fifth Hour with me, Big
Ben and Danny g Sunday, Sunday, Sunday, Happy twenty third
day of the month of June, as we celebrate being alive.
It's National Detroit Style Pizza Day today Big Pizza Weekend

(00:54):
here at National Detroit Style Pizza. I didn't even know
that was a thing until a couple of years ago
when one of the fast food chains Danny started marketing
Detroit Style pizza. I knew about Chicago style, I knew
about New York style. I'd never heard about Detroit Style.
Probably within the last ten years. I was a grown
ass man before I heard about Detroit Style Pizza. Didn't

(01:15):
didn't know anything about it. It's also National Typewriter Day, today,
So congratulations to those that own a typewriter.

Speaker 3 (01:23):
Did you see your parents use a typewriter back in
the day.

Speaker 1 (01:26):
I did. My parents loved typewriters. I had to take
I'm so old, you'reund my age, but we had typewriting class.
We learned how to type, and we used typewriters in
high school. They had a class that you had to take, and.

Speaker 3 (01:41):
Well they were digital I remember though at that time,
like they switched them out to keyboards.

Speaker 1 (01:46):
Well, we still had They had purchased a bunch of typewriters,
so they had a room filled with with typewriters. I
saw Docum Goal was trying to save money. I saw
a typewriter. Well, yeah, I saw a type documentary a
couple of years ago, and it's like, it's kind of
like station wagons. You know, there's a cult to people
that own station wagons. There's a cult to people that

(02:09):
are typewriter people, and they love the typewriter. And there
are some very famous people that's still to this day,
even in modern times, like Quentin Tarantino, I know he's old.
Some of the other Hollywood types and creative people will
use the typewriter.

Speaker 3 (02:26):
Yeah, it's almost like a real DJ busting out old
school turntables for show.

Speaker 1 (02:32):
Yeah. Yeah, so it's National Typewriter Day. And the other
fact that I believe to be true the keyboard on
the typewriter. The reason the letters are the way they are,
how messed up they are, they're not they don't make
any sense right because you've got on your keyboard on
the top row of keys you have the QWE R,

(02:54):
et cetera, et cetera, and then online too you have
the as D F G H j K L, then
online three f z X. You know, I go on.
But we talked about in the past. I don't know
if you were with me or gag On who retired
to Florida was with me. But the theory is the
reason the keyboard is designed the way it is is

(03:14):
because the typewriter door to door salesman, in order to
impress people and sell typewriters, they made sure to put
all the letters to spell typewriter on the top row
of keys. So if you look at the keyboard, whether
it's on any keyboard on your phone or keyboard on
your laptop, whatever, on the top row, it has all

(03:36):
the letters necessary to type the word typewriter and then
they added they added Q in there. But the theory
is when they designed the keyboard, it was a way
to dazzle people when they were trying to sell the typewriter.
It was a marketing move so they could sell more typewriters.

Speaker 3 (03:53):
I never wore story.

Speaker 1 (03:54):
The more you know, Danny, the more you know. But say,
if you look at the I'm not making that up.
People might think I'm making that up. If you look
at your device, all the keys to spell the word
typewriter are right there on the top row. And that was,
as the legend goes, by design because they wanted one
of the press. And think think if you were going
to door to or and you were trying to sell

(04:16):
typewriters and they're heavy and they're big, and you open
them up and say, let me show you how easy
it is, and I'll just I'll just as example, all right,
typewriter and then they would do it. And yeah, that's
my my fun factor. A lot of fun facts, a
lot of fun facts on this podcast.

Speaker 3 (04:30):
Alph is very excited right now.

Speaker 1 (04:32):
Yeah, But the reason the keys are not in alphabetical order, now,
there's another theory that that was just so they could
prevent you know, jamming of the keys and all that.
But originally they were going to have them in alphabetical order.
But the typewriter's salesman theory, which I got actually from

(04:53):
that that documentary I watched a few years ago, was
pretty pretty good. I mentioned we're gonna get to the
mail bag, but I mentioned the spinning of wheels. We
did have a major update this past week the Malamobile.
After a couple of weeks in the shop, I got
the phone call that the car was ready to be
driven back home, and I happily handed over the keys

(05:14):
of the rental car with South Dakota plates. The entire
back bumper had been replaced on the My car got
rear ended driving back from a funeral of all places,
a couple of weeks back. But this was actually an upgrade.
The car looks better now than it did before the accident.

(05:36):
The bumper. You know, the car that I drive a
lot is a little older. It's get some wear and
tear on it, and it had a few minor scrapes,
and the paint was chipped a little bit and dense.
But it's brand new and it's all painted and it
looks amazing and it was great, and I wasn't at faults,

(05:57):
so they had to pay might deductible and so they
paid my deductible and we're good on that. And I
did have to pay a little extra out of pocket
to the rental car people because my great insurance did
not cover the full cost of the rental car. But
I'm I'm happy to have the original Malormobile back. And

(06:17):
let's get to the mail bag. And that means, ohio aal,
it's bag all right, thank you, OHI al. First one

(06:38):
on the mail bag comes from Gary. Gary is in Pittsburgh,
Bent Sylva. He says, Hey, Ben, I just finished listening
to the third hour of the Tuesday Slash Wednesday pod
and I heard something that I couldn't believe got swept
under the rug. Now the headline of this email indicates
that I might be losing it. So Gary tells me

(07:02):
that he went back to listen to the podcast again
to make sure he was not losing his mind he
going crazy. He then wrote down the time. He says,
at the twenty five thirty five mark, he heard Lorraine
Ah in her high pitched feminine voice, state I love
the sausage. There's a lot of meat. That is a

(07:22):
lot of meat. And to my surprise, he says Gary,
And to the surprise of no one, especially you, Ben yelled,
that's a drop. Yeah, he said, nobody yelled that's a drop.
Did you let it slide so it doesn't turn into
a a necro situation from a Wokester or worse, an

(07:48):
HR situation. I hope that's the case, and you are
not getting soft. That's from Gary and Pittsburgh.

Speaker 3 (07:54):
Do I have your permission to insert the NCRO drop
right here?

Speaker 1 (07:58):
Well? That's is this far enough into the podcast world? Okay,
I don't know about that.

Speaker 3 (08:03):
I'll do it towards the end of the podcast. Yeah,
if you're.

Speaker 1 (08:06):
New to the show, there are a couple of pitchers
back in the day, Joe Nicro and Phil Nicro, and
they were knuckleball pitchers and I made a joke about
them on the air and maybe Danny g maybe not
made that into a drop, And every time it played
I had some Wokester email me. I used to like

(08:30):
your show. I can't believe you would be that racist.

Speaker 3 (08:34):
Let's just say that some people who have wax in
their ears think that Ben was talking about the Negro leagues.

Speaker 1 (08:42):
Yes, they thought I would just boldly pump my chest
out and say things that would be very offensive.

Speaker 3 (08:49):
To some, and we would never do that. Fox loves
the negro leagues. They just had Birmingham. Yeah, yeah, deal
with the MLB where Fox covered that game. That was
an amazing thing they did to honor the negro leagues.
I loved watching that game last week.

Speaker 1 (09:07):
Yeah, Cardinals and Giants played there. But to answer your question,
the main reason I didn't yell that's a drop is
because Lorena, for whatever reason, doesn't believe in drops, and
so I don't know what it's going to take to
get her on board, but she I just kind of
let that go. I would love for her to play
more drops. I would really like that. I think it

(09:28):
would be great. There is a balance, like I love
Roberto too. I think Roberto played a little too many
drops for a while there, and so that was a problem.
But now we've gone from driving on the Autobahn to
parking the car. We've done the complete, the complete one
eighty and uh yeah, there's a lot of stuff now.

(09:50):
I will also tell you Gary in Pittsburgh that it
is empowering that I can say whatever I want now
in any dumb thing will not be used against me
because Coop doesn't put anything in the system. He's watching
videos on his phone during the show, barely paying attention.
And Lorena, you know, she doesn't play the drops, and

(10:10):
so there's really no one there to bother putting the
drops in.

Speaker 3 (10:15):
So but you know what, I gave Lorena a homework assignment.
She is listening to this fifth hour podcast every weekend
to see where the drops go and what kind of
drop should be played.

Speaker 1 (10:27):
I was impressed by the size. I'm not gonna lie, Danny,
that was a big cock. Yeah. No, Loraina is wonderful,
but when it comes to drops, that's just not her.

Speaker 3 (10:38):
Jam No, don't try to backpedal and call her wonderful now,
because you know she's listening.

Speaker 1 (10:42):
Well, I said, but when you say, but everything before
the butt's a lie. True, So everything I just said
was a lie before the word butt. Thank you, Gary, though,
I'm glad you pay that close attention to the podcast.
Alf from the app store says, hey, Ben, where will
you and Danny or Daddy g Daddy get your Arby's fixed?

(11:04):
Now that that iconic Arby's Hollywood location has been shut down.
It says Mark, the full name guy does not approve
this message. Yeah, we talked about that on the Friday
pod alf. We talked about that Arby's location. I spent
many a night online. That was a very poorly designed Arby's.
There a small drive through, but I spent a lot

(11:28):
of nights that's so. I used to get the big
Montana that was like a pound of their fake Is
that real with fake.

Speaker 3 (11:34):
Meat in your hand? Back there? It was a mini Montana.

Speaker 1 (11:38):
Yeah, the curly fries, I got those. They had used
to et at Arby's semi regularly, and that was the location. Now,
there wasn't Arby's when I grew up that I ate at,
But as an adult I moved the Hollywood area. I
lived there for about twelve years or something like that.
I was in that area, So that was a long
time of my life in my twenties and thirties, early

(12:02):
thirties when I lived there, So I spent a lot
of time, and I knew where all the fast food
spots were, and that sign, that iconic sign, and right
down the Pig and Whistles not far from there. It's
a little bit down Hollywood Boulevard, but the pig and
whistles not that far from there, so not bad. Alf
also says, I forgot to send this to you last week,
as it would have tied into your foody fund segment.

(12:24):
I performed a surgical strike on my way home from
work one day recently. Alf says, the key is that
you need to use the app. You're talking about Arby's here.
Use the app place an online order as well. I
sent me some photos of receipts here. Get the deal.
Because the app won't allow more than one offer per order.

(12:47):
It says you need to be willing to forgo appetizers
and order only sandwiches. But Alf did that and for
five regular roast beef and two chicken sandwiches, it cost
him less than twelve dollars. Less than twelve dollars with
that little hack. But that's in Springfield, mass I'm guessing
it'll be more in California. Ohough, Massachusetts is expensive, not

(13:11):
at Springfield's not as expensive as Boston, though.

Speaker 3 (13:13):
It's also Arbi's food that you have to eat.

Speaker 1 (13:16):
Spairpoint. Spairpoint, a wild man of Morgantown, West Virginia writes,
and he says, hey, Ben and Danny g Other than
listening to your podcast, I also liked listening to some
of my favorite old school stand up comedians. Some of
my favorite Rodney Dangerfield, Sam Kinnison, and George Carlin. I
know you mentioned some of them before even calling your show.

(13:39):
Who is your favorite? Who makes you laugh every time?
I was a huge Carlin fan I saw Carlin performed.
He's the guy that used to call in. George Carlin
would call in to sports radio as George from Venice
and very random, but he loved local. He was a
radio guy. Carlin was a radio guy before he was

(13:59):
in the middle. But he was a radio guy before
he became a comedian and actually left radio to go
into comedy. Uh and he up until his you know,
till his death. My friend Lee became friends with Carlin
because Carlin was a fan of his show. So so
there's that and then cool. Yeah. I was in a

(14:21):
elevator with Rodney Dangerfield in Burbank, right across from Warner Brothers.
I didn't say anything to him. I just stared at
his face because I had seen it. He was he
had made a comeback.

Speaker 3 (14:31):
I was.

Speaker 1 (14:31):
I was a kid, I was actually before I was alive.
Dangerfield was a big star, but as a kid. Remember
he did that back to College movie or something like that,
Danny of course, Yeah, yeah, and that that was like
a rebirth. Yeah, that was like a rebirth of Dangerfield.
At the radio station we worked at in Burbank, thirty
four hundred Riverside Drive. I remember the address, right across

(14:52):
the street from Dults. Uh they. I was in an
elevator and freaking Rodney Dangerfield was in the elevator with me,
and I stared at But I'm just saying it was
very awkward. He must have thought, what a loser this
guy is, you know, I mean, I get no respect.
Oh that's a story on my line.

Speaker 3 (15:07):
No respect.

Speaker 1 (15:10):
This guy. I won't even say my name. You want
to talk to me?

Speaker 3 (15:12):
Yeah, you're talking about the classic back to School by
the way.

Speaker 1 (15:15):
There you go, Yeah, back to school. And I never
ran in to Sam Kinnison, although I was told at
the braa improv not far away from alf the Alien
or not alf Our friend from Fullerton who annoys us
as well with all these emails Mike from Fullerton, friend

(15:37):
of Ferdog, that the last place Sam Kinnison performed before
he met his demise on his way to Vegas was
the Bray improv that he did as stand up set
at the Bray inprov, got on the car to drive
to Vegas and died on the way to Vegas.

Speaker 3 (15:51):
You know, Kennison was a big radio fan as well.
He was a regular on a lot of FM music
shows like afternoon Drive. DJs would have him in the
studio and he'd do like funny drops for them. Rick Chase,
that famous Afternoon Drive DJ in San Francisco, was buddies
with him and Kennison was in his studio all the time.
So as a little kid, it was awesome hearing Kennison

(16:14):
on the radio.

Speaker 1 (16:16):
Remember hearing Kennison on with Howard Stern back in the
back in the He'd pop up there every once in
a while as well.

Speaker 3 (16:21):
So do you remember when comedians had vinyl records that
our parents or grandparents would put on the record player. Yes,
my stepdad had a Bill Cosby record that he played
a lot, and Richard Pryor, he had Richard Pryor vinyl
that played a lot in my house.

Speaker 1 (16:39):
A lot of people here might be offendive, so you
should leave now go.

Speaker 3 (16:43):
I'm say fuck and suck.

Speaker 2 (16:46):
And shit and do do.

Speaker 1 (16:51):
That's pretty cool. There's a guy that he killed himself,
but he was pretty funny before that. Uh, what was
this guy's I'm trying to think of it. He was
around the time Chris Rock was coming up? Is it
Richard Jenny? Does that name? Ring a bell?

Speaker 3 (17:08):
Does that?

Speaker 1 (17:08):
Does?

Speaker 3 (17:09):
Ring a Bell? Yeah?

Speaker 1 (17:10):
Yeah, I liked his stuff a lot, but he he
never really his career never took off for whatever reason.
I don't know why, but I thought he was pretty
funny back in there. But those are all time greats.

Speaker 3 (17:20):
Wild man.

Speaker 1 (17:21):
You got Carlin Kinnison and Rodney Dangerfield. That's just wonderful. Yeah.

Speaker 3 (17:27):
Jenny died back in two thousand and seven.

Speaker 1 (17:30):
Yeah, so he's been dead for a while, but he
was a very funny man. I'm sure there's still some
stuff on YouTube of his from back in the day.
Next up is the aforementioned Mike from the academic mecca
of Fullerton. Mike says, hey, Ben and Danny g I
have a question about the Mallard meet and greet coming
up in Vase. Yeah, we're doing a Mallor meet and greet.

(17:52):
Danny August third in Lost Wages.

Speaker 3 (17:55):
Yeah, I saw this on your social media you're invited if.

Speaker 1 (17:58):
You want to come. I don't know if you want
to make your way to Vegas. But Malard me ingreet
in Vegas August third, and Mike says slug claimed the
place that you're going at serves Mallard chicken fingers with
honey mustard sauce. Do you know if they allow you
to substitute the honey mustard for ranch dressing, that that
could be a deal breaker for many of the people

(18:20):
thinking about going. Yeah, we'll make sure they don't serve
ranch stressing. I'll talk to the people when I get
to the venue and I'll be like, hey, listen, it's
a Mallard event. We cannot have the ranch dressing. We
cannot have that. He also says, after hearing you bemoan
all the Ivy League nerds and the Dodger Analytical Department,

(18:42):
let me ask you this, would you rather have them
or the DeVry and Itt tech nerds working for the Angels.

Speaker 3 (18:51):
I wouldn't bore you with all the numbers and all
the things that they talked about about the OBP and
the SLG and the ISO and name it.

Speaker 1 (19:06):
Yeah, I think the Angels hired people from America Online
and Netscape Navigator. That's what the Angels have in their
analytics department. Yeah. Now I was complaining, Danny, because the
LA Dodgers, the team that we both love, have nine
pitchers currently that are hurt with major, some major, most major.
Yamamoto's out, but you have Walker Buehler just got hurt again,

(19:31):
although we think that's something else he'said. Tommy John surgery, Trice,
Tony Gonsolin, Tommy John surgery, carrot top, He's Dustin may
have major surgery. And so the thing that I brought
up in my whole point, my hypothesis after a minutes
long investigation, was how is it possible for the last

(19:53):
ten plus years, the Dodgers have been coddling their pitchers.
They've been limiting the number of pitches they throw, they've
been limiting the number of innings they pitch. They've done
everything you're in air quotes supposed to do to protect pictures,
and it doesn't keep them from getting hurt. And I

(20:13):
flashed back to something that Tommy John, the actual Tommy
John who was on this podcast with me said, and
other old time ballplayers that I've talked to who were pitchers,
and they universally said, you've got to throw more, not less.
You can't take as many days off. You don't have
to worry the pitch count thing. You don't need to

(20:33):
worry about it. Well, you're just a boomer. You don't
know what you're talking about. Okay, Well, the smart people, allegedly,
the wise people, the nuanced, knowledgeable people, have been running
the Dodgers and handling the pitchers. How's that working out?
How's it working out? Daddy? Answer the question? How do

(20:54):
you like them? Apples? Uh? Oh boy?

Speaker 3 (20:57):
Anyway?

Speaker 1 (20:58):
Yeah, carried away there.

Speaker 3 (20:59):
At least bets, so Tani and Freeman. Oh wait, we
don't have bets.

Speaker 1 (21:03):
Oh yeah, that's true. Yeah, I heard. The rumor is
they're not going to even put him back at shortstop.
They're going to use this as an out and they're
going to move him back to the outfield and they're
going to trade for a shortstop at the deadline and
bring somebody else into play shortstop.

Speaker 3 (21:17):
Sounds about right now, and they'll.

Speaker 1 (21:20):
Say, well, we don't want to get hurt and all that.
But he didn't get hurt playing shortstop.

Speaker 3 (21:24):
Dan.

Speaker 1 (21:24):
He got hit by a pitch. It's not like he
got hit by a line drive at shortstop. He got
hit by a pitch that would have happened if he
was in the outfield. A little rough, all right. Next
one from Kwang in Vietnam. He says, big man and
Danny g does a club sandwich stand for chicken lettuce
under bacon? What say you? Well, this is random?

Speaker 3 (21:49):
Never heard of that in my life. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (21:51):
Well, this is the history of the club sandwich. According
to Kwang, he says today a myth exists about the
club sam much that it's spelling stands for chicken and
lettuce under bacon. The origins of the acronym go back
to the nineteenth century clubhouse in New York. The Saratoga
Clubhouse in Saratoga Springs claimed it introduced the sandwich in

(22:17):
eighteen ninety four, and the Union Club, located on Fifth
Avenue in New York City added The Clubhouse added a
clubhouse sandwich to its menu five years earlier. Now the
Union Club. Stay with me. There'll be a test on
this later. The Union Club sandwich served as a template
for the modern day combination of two toasted slices of

(22:37):
thin bread, turkey or chicken and ham in between. At
the same time, the Saratoga Club claimed to have introduced
this combination. You know, it sounds like the French Dip
debate in La Yeah, we have a French dip battle
in Los Angeles between Coals and what's the other place?

(22:59):
Coal is in downtown your skid row and then near
Dodger Stadium's Philips. They've been battling it out for a while,
it says. The recipe also specified cutting it into triangles
to serve in the twentieth century. But wait, there's more
everything you need to know about a club sandwich from
our friend Kuang in Vietnam in the twentieth century.

Speaker 3 (23:18):
The rest of the time for drop right now out there.

Speaker 1 (23:21):
You The recipe also appeared in the Good Housekeeping Everyday Cookbook,
this time with the choice of chicken or turkey or
and tomato. The next year, the sandwich we made an
appearance in the World's Fair and sales. Now, now that's
the big thing. When you would appear at the World's
Fair that way you've arrived and over the years it

(23:42):
has become the thing. So thank you, Quain. That's way
too much about the club sandwich, but we appreciate your
interest in helping the show Steve from Toronto writes into
the podcast. Yeah, he says, And by the way, if
you want to email the podcast for a future episode,
you can do it right now. You can do it tomorrow,
you can do it next day. I recommend doing it
right now because a lot of people forget. They forget

(24:04):
to write in Andre's I meant to do that and
I didn't get to it, so it takes like a minute.
You send us a message. Step in Toronto says, Now
that it's summer here in Toronto, I'm enjoying the nice
weather and I want to know, would you guys rather
lounge by the pool or hang out on the beach.
So from Steve in Toronto, now, you can't go wrong

(24:25):
with the pool or the beach. But I've become as
i've gotten older, more of a beach guy as i've
gotten older. When I was a kid, it was all
about the pool. I love the pool, but something magical
and it's really the Pacific, which is the superior ocean.
I've spent a lot of time on the East Coast
and gone to the Atlantic, and the Atlantic's fine, but
it doesn't compare to the majestic nature of the Pacific. Ocean.

(24:48):
So if I'm on the Pacific or if I'm somewhere
in Hawaii or something like that. Oh man, all day
and all night, Danny, what about you?

Speaker 3 (24:57):
Yeah, I guess this one's kind of a toss up
because I do like I'm not like, I love the beach,
I love the ocean, but I don't like the sand
and getting the sand in your sunscreen, you know what
I mean. Like, there's a lot of.

Speaker 1 (25:13):
And other places.

Speaker 3 (25:13):
Yes, you find sand in crevices you didn't know your
body had for days, so the sand could be a
little messy when you're by the pool. The great part
is if you're at a resort, especially you get pool
side service. So you get a club sandwhich brought to you,
You have drinks brought to you. That part of being

(25:34):
by pool. You have a TV screen over at the
bar that has like the football game on. That part
of laying next to the pool is amazing.

Speaker 1 (25:42):
Yeah, those are all nice things. But if you go
to a resort on the ocean, you can have maybe
not a pool, but you can have people bring drinks
to you and beach chares and all that. Regie Reggie
from Detroit writes and he says, Ben, I saw that
Google is teasing AI generated movies in the future. Is

(26:05):
this progress or is this regression for movies? So I
didn't see this story, Danny. I don't know if you
guys talked about it on Covino and Rich, but he
did send me a link here. Reggie, I would say
this is regression. I think the whole point of art
is it's created by humans. Am I wrong on that?

(26:26):
Is that a bad take? I mean it's it's appreciating
what another human being is doing, not what a robot's doing.

Speaker 3 (26:35):
Well in the shit we're stepping in or hackers are
stepping in right now, there's a bunch of deep fakes
out there. There's a younger actor who's facing hot water
right now. Nothing he did wrong, but somebody has a
deep fake out there with him and a minor Imagine
being a famous actor or actress and somebody makes this

(26:56):
AI generated crap about you and you have to fight
it off.

Speaker 1 (27:01):
Yeah. No, I totally get it. And even people that
are on the low rung of the entertainment tower, like us,
we're near the bottom of the totem pole, but we
still have, you know, this crap that we're gonna have
to deal with and people can. Eventually they'll be able
to mimic our voices completely.

Speaker 3 (27:18):
Like this, necro drop right here. There's no way you
would have said listen, But all those Negroes look the same.

Speaker 1 (27:25):
Yeah, that's a that's like those videos of Biden walking
the wrong direction around the helicopter. That's a deep fake.
Clearly that's a deep fake. It's it's yeah, oh my god,
they oh yeah they oh what are we doing?

Speaker 3 (27:38):
Public service announcement? He said, necro as in the pictures
the Brothers.

Speaker 1 (27:43):
Racist, Yes, Joe and Phil as I like to call him.
Steve from Minnesota rites in and says that he heard
that Woody Harrelson has not owned a cell phone in
three years. How much money would you, ben in Danny
have to get in order for you to go three
years without a cell phone. I don't know that it's

(28:06):
possible to go three years without a cell phone, not
what we do for a living. How is Woody Harrelson
able to get away with not owning a cell phone
for three years? Wow? Man, that's uh, that's pretty wild.
No phone, think about it.

Speaker 3 (28:27):
He's his own boss, so he could tell his agent, Eh,
if you want to come to my house and buzz
hit my buzzer outside my gates. See if I'm available,
that's what you're gonna do. I don't take calls.

Speaker 1 (28:37):
There's only a few now. He's young enough where he should.
He doesn't have an out like I remember Bud Seelick,
the old Commission of Baseball, never used email. I don't
believe Jerry Jones uses email. Donald Trump, I don't think
uses email. Like if you're at a certain age, I get it.
But how old is Woody Harrelson. I don't even know

(29:00):
he's got Is he in sixties?

Speaker 3 (29:01):
Sixties? Probably mid sixties, I'll look it up.

Speaker 1 (29:04):
He was like the young guy on Cheers back in
the day.

Speaker 3 (29:07):
Yeah, exactly. But unfortunately his co stars are almost you know,
they're getting up there and yeah Harrelson is yeah, we're right.
He is about to be sixty three.

Speaker 1 (29:19):
Okay, so you know, early sixties, mid sixties. I just
typed this in to the guy in Minnies says there's
a clip of Ted Nansen saying, let me explain something
about Woody. He doesn't have a phone. He's one of
those bullies in life that make other people carry his
phone for it. But what that would mean he has a
phone he's somebody else says, carry ummm, let's see.

Speaker 3 (29:42):
Then he allow, so he has like a phone assistant.

Speaker 1 (29:45):
He says. He responded to his podcast interview, says, well,
I just don't like to have, you know, to be
readily available to any human being at any time, he stated.
He said somebody else brought up the fact that he
doesn't want to It doesn't feel good to always be
at the beck and call the phone. Harrelson said, I
like to be in touch with people in a way,

(30:08):
but I don't like the appendage on my appendage. You know.
I made a thing where I'm okay, I'm like, okay,
I'm gonna set a two hour limit on my phone.
So because he does have a phone, he said to
our limitus phone, because I've given it up now three
three and a half years. But back then he said,

(30:28):
I was going to set a limit like two hours
or whatever.

Speaker 3 (30:30):
All right, So he just doesn't use it the way normal,
well not normal, but the rest of us do.

Speaker 1 (30:36):
Yeah, it sounds like he keeps it in a drawer
or something like that, and he doesn't like it being
like an ankle bracelet. Yeah, I mean, there's a guy
that we work with that does the same thing. So
I mean, you know, stuff happens, and that's the way
it is. All right, we'll get out on that. I
think that's that's a good number of email messages and
the rest of you. If we did not use your message,

(30:57):
if you want us to use it on a future episode,
send it. We start fresh with the mailbag every week.
You can send it care of Benmalers Show at gmail
dot com. It is Sunday, Danny. What do you got
going on today? I'll be back tonight. I know I've
got the radio show leading into Monday, Sunday night into
Monday morning, fresh content, everything that happened on this busy

(31:21):
wink wink sports weekend. But what about you, Danny?

Speaker 3 (31:25):
My better half has been trying to twist my arm
to go to the movies. I haven't been to the
movie theater. I don't know about you, but I haven't
been in like a year.

Speaker 1 (31:32):
It's been longer for me, man longer for me.

Speaker 3 (31:34):
She's trying to get me to go watch a cartoon
movie inside Out too. Here's the problem. I didn't see
Inside Out, so I kind of feel lost. I need
the emotion.

Speaker 1 (31:45):
Well, why don't you just watch it on the like,
watch it on your phone or whatever online?

Speaker 3 (31:50):
You mean on demand?

Speaker 1 (31:52):
Well, I have a guy that knows a guy who
may know a website. You can watch it for free.

Speaker 3 (31:58):
But is it in Russian with the English subtitle?

Speaker 1 (32:02):
You'd have to talk to the guy who knows the
guy who told me about the guy, and then you
can talk to that guy and then uh, I can,
I can hold you? What do you want to do?
You want to watch the original couple of movies? I
I gotta I got a link for it. I'll hook
you up, you know from I'll let you. I'll let
you know my guy who and you can watch that.
So have a wonderful rest of your Sunday.

Speaker 3 (32:24):
Yeah, you're back on the radio tonight.

Speaker 1 (32:26):
Yeah, and enjoy what's left of your weekend. It's a
workday for me. It's a double Every day is a workday,
but it's a double header duty today, so day night,
double header. This would be the morning pod and then
be up all night tonight cracking, cracking the whip, the
salt mine of audio content. The dojo will be open
for business and we'll catch you then.

Speaker 3 (32:46):
Austa pasta.

Speaker 1 (32:47):
I don't get no respect from anyone called up suicide prevention,
Try to tork me into it. Got a murder.

Speaker 3 (32:57):
I gotta go.
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