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January 20, 2024 189 mins

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Episode Transcript

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Speaker 1 (00:01):
F Zone Media. Hey everybody, Robert Evans here and I
wanted to let you know this is a compilation episode.
So every episode of the week that just happened is
here in one convenient and with somewhat less ads package
for you to listen to in a long stretch if
you want. If you've been listening to the episodes every
day this week, there's going to be nothing new here

(00:22):
for you, but you can make your own decisions. Oh
my goodness, it's it could happen here a podcast that
is about things falling apart are Dystopian now and tomorrow,
And for the last several days has been heavily about
the Consumer Electronics Show, which is a huge event every
year where one hundred and twenty to one hundred and

(00:43):
fifty thousand people flood into Las Vegas to show off
all of the new gadgets and to have big, fancy
panels on the future of technology. And this has been
a particularly good year for the Dystopia beat. Part of
that because the entire industry is obsessed right now with
artificial intelligence. Now there's a couple reasons for this. Every
laptop manufacturer is basically throwing out laptops with AI assistance.

(01:06):
Microsofts is copilot, and they're doing this because laptop sales
have stalled a lot of people, Like the pandemic was
great for laptop sales, and then people stopped buying them
because most people don't need to replace their laptops very often.
So there's this desperate hope that by scaring everybody into
thinking they need AI immediately, they can get folks to
buy a new raft of machines. And outside of that,

(01:29):
it's just as I'm sure you're aware, with interest rates
where they are, companies, Tech companies, particularly startups, are having
trouble getting VC money venture capital money invested in them.
So there's this kind of desperate hope that by plugging
AI constantly they can fill in the gap. So today
we have probably in a week or two, we're going
to have be putting out a long investigation based on

(01:50):
number of panels we went to with executives from Google,
from weirdly enough McDonald's, from Adobe, from Nvidia, from the
Consumer Electronics Association, in multiple government agencies including DHS, on
what they see as the future of AI. That's going
to be some pretty in depth reporting. But today we
want to talk about the AI products that we've been
seeing and as a spoiler, they're basically all the dumbest

(02:13):
shit you've ever heard of. So I want to introduce
our panel today, coming back after catching a horrible, horrible
lung infection, throat infection, some kind of infection. Yeah, Garrison
got strep throat and despite the fact that we've been
hanging out together, I did not, which does prove I'm
genetically superior. We also have Tavia Mora coming back, our

(02:34):
technical expert. Hello Tavia, Howdy everybody, and for the first
time on well, no, not for the first time, for
the third time on it could happen here, the upcoming
host of the cool Zone media tech focused show Better
Offline ed zitron ed well Gwan Hello, Yeah, sorry, Hi, Yeah,

(02:55):
I hit my head on the way and yeah, it's
a truly awful show this year. The thing that I
said to Robert yesterday when we were talking about the show,
and this really stood out to me, is if you
had told me this was twenty twenty one, I'd have
believed you. It doesn't feel despite the use of the
word AI, it does not feel like tech has actually
moved that far, and it's very strange. Yeah, there was

(03:17):
this period of time after the iPhone came out where
every year there would be really big leaps in the
tech you saw. And this part of I think why
they're leaning on AI so heavily is otherwise it's just
the same laptop, smartphones, speakers, connected gadgets, you know, autonomous
cars and shit that we've been seeing for years and
they really haven't jumped forward much. But you know, the

(03:38):
downside of that is a lot of things. But the
upside of that is people are increasingly cramming AI into
insane shit in the hopes that somebody will want to
buy it. And so I want to start off ed
since you are not just our newest host, but also
a Las Vegas native, I think people could probably assume
that from your Vegas accent. Yes, natural, Yeah, What is

(04:01):
your favorite or the first AI product do you want
to get into today? I want to talk about the rabbit.
The rabbit are one? Oh god? Yes. So this thing
is a square box and I can't tell if it
acts without your phone or with your phone, but it
uses AI. You you speak into it like a walkie
talkie and it does a series of actions based on
what you say, so it can do all the things

(04:23):
that Siri could do five years ago, like change music
and start. But it also has like a three hundred
and sixty degree camera which can Based on the extremely
awkward and agonizing how a long demo twenty five minutes,
but bon me, it felt like an hour, it can
look at a picture of Rick Castley and start very
and after several agonizing seconds stop playing never give you Up.

(04:45):
It can also, it claims, do a series of nuanced
actions like you can say, get me a cab home
and also put on my tunes and also change the
air conditioned at seventy four degrees, all in one one sentence.
Now you may think, why do I need to spend
two hundred dollars on a device to do this? And

(05:06):
the answer is you don't. You do not need to.
This thing looks cool, and on some level, I'm just
glad we're getting new tat. Yeah, the design is not bad.
It's like a square. It looks like it's maybe two
two and a half inches by two and a half
inches or so something like that. Yeah, a little screen.
It's like well designed from an industrial design standpoint, and
I think the big Yeah, it looks like it's just

(05:29):
that it's a it's a basically a seri that can
use at, it can use Uber, it could book a
flight for you. One of the things they show is
it like planning a vacation in London for you, which
does seem to kind of go against the point of
like going somewhere new and like figuring out what you
want to do there, as opposed to it's basically pulling
from a list I'm sure in the AI wrote of
like top ten things to do in London. And it's

(05:51):
just very weird because all of these tech guys, who
they very loudly claim their free spirits, they're independent and
not control by any authority, they cannot be manipulated, all
desperately want a machine to tell them exactly what the
hell to do with their lives. And it's so bizarre
because they we were discussing the different articles about this,

(06:12):
and people trying to argue oy this thing, these three sis.
It's like, oh, it takes out the friction between all
these apps. I'm sorry, I just don't think there's that
much friction. Pull out my phone. I'm on Uber, Yes, right,
I pull out my phone, I pull up grub Hub,
I order food it's very simple. It's remarkably easy. I
don't see how talking to a square is better, Like
it's the same, Like I could call someone on the

(06:34):
phone and do it hands free, or I could text them,
and I always text them because that's more pleasant. I mean, like,
I have my phone open to signal right now, I
can swipe up, go to Uber and less than a
second saying the words move from signal to the Uber
app takes a whole lot longer than just doing it
with my thumb. I also do love the idea of

(06:55):
like completely ruining the point of Signal, which is an encrypted,
extremely secure message app, to be like, hey, random box,
I want to feed my private messages through you and
have you read them out to me as I go
about my day. I don't know what your data retention
policy is or what you'll be doing with it. They
sold out and they made two million dollars, like ten

(07:16):
million of them, some ten thousand. Sorry, it's just and
it's I've read. I read like eleven articles about this thing,
because I occasionally drive myself insane with these things when
I see everyone excited about something, but I can't read
a single article that tells me why I should buy it,
even though my rap brain says, oh, take with screen
I want, but then I want to use it. But

(07:36):
I'll have to explain this to the normal people in
my life why I have this, And I don't want
to do that if it's useless. But on top of that,
I just don't think controlling my life with voice is
that useful. Yeah, I don't like that. I'm already and
I think a lot of people are already kind of
fed up with the extent to which my smartphone is
a part of my life. Yeah, but like it does
irreplaceable tasks at the moment for me, So I have it.

(07:59):
This thing is number one adding a device because I
think it does require your phone. But it's also, like
you know, in addition to the current problems I have
with privacy on my smartphone, I am adding another company
and another device and another set of security potential security
flaws to it. But on top of that, the thing
they have failed to explain anywhere, and no journalist apparently

(08:21):
is interrogate them about this is they claim this thing
can log onto your Uber and make a flight booking,
ostensibly having your passport information, your date of birth, and
all this stuff. First and foremost. That's like you mentioned,
the data retention policy is very strange. But where is
this crap all happening? Is it happening on my phone?
Is my phone just doing all this? I refuse to
believe that. So you're doing this in the kind of

(08:41):
virtual machine environment, how is that possible? Surely these companies
are going to have a problem with that. Mark Sullivan
for Fast Company. Actually, I think ask them this and
they were like, oh, yeah, they'll be fine with it.
They just want people using their apps. I do not
think they're going to be fine with this. Companies hate
it when they hand off power from the user, who
will still be liable to another computer. Yeah. Well, the

(09:04):
other thing is just that, like part of me kind
of suspects And when you watch the video, we'll play
a clip from it in a second. The CEO of
Rabbit very clearly, like a lot of guys in tech,
wants to be Steve Jobs. And I will say one
thing I kind of suspect that might actually be that
would be a Steve Jobs move is he may have
just been hoping that this thing coming out selling a

(09:25):
shitload on free order and getting huge buzz would force
these companies after the fact to allow integration, like he
may just be gambling, Like if I get enough buzz
behind me, Uber and whatnot will come to the table
and be willing to work with me, because suddenly this
is like the Hippus new gadget, except ten thousand customers
is actually not that many, and I actually look forward

(09:46):
to I really can't wait for what two months to
pass people to get this and someone to end up
like sending the word penis to their or company slack
because they wanted to order pizza, and on top of that,
ordering a fly, ordering an Uber. These are actually nuanced actions.
Coming to Mandeley Bay toenite Uber took me to the
wrong place because it decided it wanted to go to

(10:07):
the convention center. I did not select that. If you
go to the airport, you need to put in Southwest
Airlines and what have you. With grabhab you need to
do little bits. It's just most people don't order lunch,
they order something for lunch, and I just don't. Ah,
this whole thing just feels useless. Yeah. See, for me,
it's the additional level of abstraction on top of these
already abstracted apps that we use to order our basic

(10:30):
necessities like eating and things like that. It worries me
in sort of like a fantasy dystopic way. What happens
when people suddenly don't use it after getting used to
using it? Like what are they going to know? Are
they going to know how to operate a door dash app?
Are they going to know how to book a flight?
That kind of thing. Yeah, it is kind of because
one of the things there was a c neet review

(10:50):
that said, like, well, the potential of this is that
it completely removes physical use of a device. So you're
using these apps, but they're just a part of your life.
Uber is just a thing you to You never look
at anything when you do it, And I'm like, is
that better? Like I don't like the idea that you
basically have a robot that you treat as like your
nanny that plans your life for you. Like the amount

(11:12):
of hype over there will be a more concerted piece
about this coming out. But the first thing I thought
when I looked at all these guys talking about how
cool it was to be able to just tell a
robot to book your flight and plan your travel and
book your hotels for you. That's like part of the
experience of traveling, and like choosing things to do is
like one of the things that traveling is. And the

(11:33):
desire so many people have to hand off elements of
choice really reminds me of like cult dynamics. And I
don't think this is a consumer thing. I think this
is specifically a weird subculture of tech people of AI people,
a lot of the same folks who got into NFTs.
But this desire, like life is so complex and scary,
I want to hand over all of my agency to

(11:54):
a robot. It's the same thing that is behind a
lot of like why people join cults. And I don't
think this is a pro societal problem, but I think
it is a weird problem with the group of people
who are most excited to have a fucking rabbit. It
seems like a sad thing to me that folks might
only attend bars or restaurants that are rated like four
point five and above that's decided by something else, Yeah,

(12:16):
and they don't get to have this like experience of
walking into like the sedious bar you've ever seen in
your life and have like maybe possibly like a life
changing experience. I was just in South Korea and we
went to this fried chicken place that ended up being
close actually was like we opened but nobody was there,
which made me just want to leave before getting killed.

(12:36):
And so I just went to a random chicken place
across the road from my hotel, and I thought, well,
it'll feed me. It was wonderful, it was delightful, and
it was I could not find any reviews for it.
It was just a flipping place. And I don't I
think these people who are desperate for a device like this,
this kind of weird nanny device. First of all, I

(12:59):
don't think they think about the practicalities of this. I
don't think this is quicker or easier better. But also
they're like, oh, I wish I could just say one
thing and all of these things could happen for me.
Same people, by the way, who are saying that people
need to pull themselves up by their bootstraps and do
things for themselves. It's just I don't know if they'd
even call it dystopian. It's just weird and sad to me.
Speaking of weird and sad, we're going to move on

(13:20):
to the next product in a second, but first I
gotta play everybody in case you haven't seen it or
heard it? The CEO of Rabbit trying to rickroll the
audience with his hell device. Have you seen this, Garrison? Oh? Okay,
eyes on the screen. Everybody to activate the eye, just

(13:42):
double tap the button. Oh funny seeing you here, Rick,
Let me take a look. I'm never gonna give you

(14:04):
up now enjoying what am I getting Rick rolled in
my own kenotes? Let's move on to the next one.
All right, I have a question real quick. So what
is the functionality he just activated? Is it that you
just put you point the eye at something and it
chooses an Actually the I automatically see Rick Astley and

(14:28):
choose to play one specific song of his. Because that
actually doesn't seem like a feature. That seems like a bug. Yeah,
that seems like what happens if it sees certain people. Yeah,
Jeffrey Epstein, Yeah, what happens if it sees Jeffrey Yeah,
plays children screaming like what is wow? Is this thing work?
Booking trips to Florida? It I maybe it's respectable that

(14:52):
they showed how bad the lag is because that moment
where there's quiet after he like clicks on it is
like it's loading it's processing for a considerable period of time.
And it's just also I feel for the bloke because
I know he was probably so excited to do this
and he's like, I'm gonna be Steve Jobs. But man,
when you can't perform, you don't perform, Like, yeah, that's

(15:14):
bad delivery. Did I just get Rick rolled in my
own video? It was like that, I forget what the
movie's called. Oh high Mark, Yeah it is, and obviously
like English is the reverse language, but like it's a performance.
You like, you practice, right, you get coached and stuff
because you're trying to represent your company. Oh I tell

(15:35):
you this from experience as I've run a PR firm. Yeah,
that guy actually did practice because all of that was
his actual timing wasn't bad. He just does not have
that dog in him. Yeah. Yeah, you bring in other
people to do like that anyway, and everybody, anyone, anyone's
mind on the rabbit changed having seen that. Absolutely not

(15:57):
Garrison has a look on their face. No, it's just
like what I've always wanted in a tech gadget is
be able to point at three to sixty five degree
camera at a picture of a musician and then wait
thirty seconds and then have an AI pick a random
song of theirs. That's always what I wanted for the future. Yeah, yeah,
that's that's the dream of fucking Archimedes had. That's right

(16:20):
he was when he was building his laser. That's right
that we all saw in the most recent Indiana Jones film.
Speaking of the most recent Indiana Jones film, this podcast
is entirely sponsored by that movie. So here's some other ads.

(16:44):
Why are we giving free advertising to Disney? Why are
we Why? Because that movie was so close to being
worth it that last twenty minutes. They fully committed, They
fully get it. No Nazis machine gunning Roman Legion. Pretty funny,
It's pretty funny. Well, do you know who would have
loved cees our our comedian is probably yes, he probably

(17:06):
would have would have had a great time. What what
next AI product do we want to talk about? How
about the pet one Garrison? You saw that? All right?
So I think I think I think me and Ed
both saw chat GPT for animals. Yeah damn, which is
not really what it is saying. It's like it it

(17:30):
scans a picture of your dog and then tries to
tell you if it has any health problem. It's based
on that picture. It's it's it's You're not you're not
actually talking to your dog or anything. It just it
takes pictures of animals and then it analyzes it to
tell you how the dog is feeling. Blah blah blah
blah blah, it's it's. I saw a product like this
earlier at CES. I saw a product. I saw a

(17:51):
product like this last year. They're just calling it chat
GPT because it's an AI name. It's it's it's it's
it's it's hip like because people people, they're that that
will make people spend money off. It was every CES
I see something that begins to make me disassociate and
I walk I walked past there and blovo the chat GPT,

(18:14):
and my brain was just like could you just like
start like glitching out? And then when I went to
look it up, as Garrison did, I was so disappointed
because I hope that these would just crackpots. So like, yep,
you put the microphone to your dog. Now you know
what your dog's saying that I would respect even if
it didn't work, just if you're like, yeah, fuck it, yeah,
your cat's said he hates your Your cat's been radicalized.

(18:34):
I'm afraid. See there's a fun product in here, which
is you sell to rubes and a product that you're
like it translates your dog's micro expressions into language. And
then the actual paying customers are sickos like us, and
you just take control of somebody's pets voice. That would
be so cool. You can have their like, yeah, your

(18:54):
cat's racist, now your dog's are Nazi like this is
this is the perfect product for HB. Love Craft. I
would have loved this. No if you gave me like
the show light to me, but for dogs on my phone,
I would spend whatever you want. A thousand dollars I
will get I wouldn't pay like average West Coast rent

(19:15):
prices to be able to like gaslight some family into
thinking their dog is a terrorist. And see a friend
of mine, Oh, what's what's wrong? Ed chat GPT said
that I said that my dogs joined ISIS and I
don't know. I don't know how he did it, but
he's been he's talking about a caliphate according to the app.

(19:35):
I don't know what this app is bankrupting me. I
paid four and a half thousand dollars for this app
a month. I don't know why I need it so
because so unfortunately had to miss yesterday. So there was
probably an endless number of tech innovations that I was
unable to see because I had to miss one day.
But with help a pencil and I was able to
return today to do one final chat GPT of antibiotics.

(19:58):
That's that is exactly what my doctor said, actually, but
I did. I did swear revenge on cees. So I
just walked around most mostly mostly the Venetian just seeing
all of the worst things I could find in documenting
them so I could get revenge from that twink poisonam
with strap throat. So the first really good thing is this.

(20:19):
I mostly walked around the award winning sections because that's
where you find only the best. There was an award
winning speaker called Audio Cu that all of their marketing
was built from this horrible, horrible uh Ai image generation
of this like extremely busty blonde woman in a latex suit,

(20:40):
but if you zoom it onto her fingernails, her her
fingernails are like sticking through the wrong side of her fingers. There.
Oh my god, Oh my god, it's the woman's from
that one movie for Oh damn it not skin the one.
The other it was the woman where the alien was
sex and then she killed people when she had sex

(21:01):
with them. It's the same thing, Yes, terrifying. Yes, rita's
a cool in and say what that is? Yeah, it
looks just like that. It has relaxed stick it in,
which is pretty funny. So that that was pretty bad.
Now I respect that. I respect that. That's a baller
move right there. Again, this is this is for a

(21:22):
speaker company like DJ Girlfriend in the shape it's a
speaker in the shape of a girlfriend. No, it's just
home theater speakers. It just have a horrible AI generated
woman as their spokesperson. I mean I would buy it
if it was DJ Girlfriend. Though. DJ Girlfriend is a
great idea for a product and might stop several AI
has brought back sexism. If you do DJ Girlfriend right,

(21:46):
you could stop at least one mass shooting. Finally, we
have a real solution now. Another product that won the
CEES twenty twenty four Innovation Awards is an AI powered
coffee brewer and grinder system. I'm just gonna read the
description from the coffee's been missing, that's right. I know.
We wake up every morning make our little French press coffee.

(22:08):
That's fine, But you know what could be better? An
AI system that does it for you. I'm gonna read
the award the award description for this product. Okay, introducing
Barista Brew Coffee Brewer and Grinder System, a smart coffee
system that tailors your brew to perfection with AI guided personalization.
Easily adjust brewing parameters for a custom cup. New expertise needed,

(22:32):
rate to track and refine your bruise brew iq AI
suggestions for your ideal taste, simplify with one touch favorites,
elevate your coffee experience. Yeah, well, I hear all that.
The one thing I think is simplify. That's that's simple.
The Movie's Spacies, by the way, I love that movie.
One of one of the best hr Geiger art utilizations.

(22:56):
Yeah yeah, and easily the horniest movie of the nineteen nineties.
Which is Lot of which is which is a high
high bar. So on on. On this AI coffee maker.
On the front, there's a little control panel with nine
different settings that you can you can change because they're
all on a graph. We have we have citrus, spice, nutty, fruity, balanced, cocoa, floral, herbal,

(23:20):
and honey, so you can you can with your with
the with the ease of a touchpad, start to customize
your own AI coffee, so that that is revolutionary. I'm
going to be getting one for Robert this Christmas. Thank you, Garrison.
I know I've always thought, you know, what I hate
is the experience of uh, of exploring new flavors on
my own and and learning new ways of brewing coffee,

(23:42):
a beverage I consume every day. So I'm glad to
be handing that whole experience off to a machine. That's right,
and I know a lot of people used Tavia. Just
brought something up that I think is relevant here. It's
a Guardian article about an AI smoothie shop that opened
in San Francisco well before a ce S. That is
a combination of it's being driven forward with AI technology

(24:05):
as well as five G stuff that I think had
opened up and then like three weeks later had shut down.
Oh that's they were like, a robot will pick the
perfect smoothie for you. Well, I actually want to bring
I want to bring something up. So I love smoking me.
I have pellet smokers at home, and I saw a
few times on this show AI grills and I just

(24:26):
looked up one called a brisk It smart grill, and
I was like, how could you possibly make a thing
which is basically maintaining hot air in a tube long
enough until the food's done? And what it is is
it has a thing You can ask the grill what
seasoning should I add to make my chicken skew a
spicy or how do I see a medium rest eight?
I don't fucking know. Why don't you learn to cook?

(24:47):
You twat? It's just like the enjoyable part of cooking
is the experimentation and learning taste. But no, thank you,
just like that goddamn coffee thing. Oh, I don't want
to learn anything. I don't want to have a human experience.
That's the thing with a lot of these AI solutions,
will call them, is I feel like they're robbing people

(25:09):
of real experiences. Yeah, for like no, been Like there's
some stuff that like, you know, the ability of a
smartphone to once you had to be like in a
building in order to like access a phone or like
use a payphone. Now you can connect with people everywhere.
That's that's a clear benefit, right. There's downsides to it, obviously,
but it's a clear benefit, but like, now you don't

(25:31):
have to learn. Now, now you don't have to cook.
You can let a robot do it for you. It's like, well,
but why cooking is pleasurable? And if I don't want
to cook, I will go to a restaurant or order food,
and it's cheaper than buying several thousand dollars AI device.
I mean, some things are hard to learn, which brings
me to the next product that's smoking me. But had

(25:55):
kind of like like, uh, like parenting, right, so good, okay, nice,
you know what, Garrison, I'm proud of you. That was
a good sex way so AI parenting, especially with your
infant child. This was also in the CEES Awards section,
so you know it's gonna be legit. I was able
to see an demonstration of an AI baby crib that
will shake your baby up and down based on facial

(26:18):
expression analysis done by an AI, and yeah, I'm gonna
show a show it here. So here is here's the
cutting edge facial expressions we have anger discussed fear, happiness, sadness,
and surprise, and that basically that data will go into
this little crib which will start shaking and moving up
and down. Based on what they scan on your baby's face.

(26:39):
So to be clear, there is a protocole, yes, snow
that exists where drop my phone. There there's a protut
called the snow which is like a for infants and
it notices when they're fussing and it kind of like
lightly rocks them. But the way it rocks them is
so very light. It is very much a This is
this is what a mother would do with a brand
new baby biked. You don't want to move into much.

(27:02):
That one has like six pictures from the intro of
light to me and a hot rate monitor. It's like, yeah,
hand over your baby to AI. Great, Yeah, this product
looks like a baby Morocca. The pace that you shake
in it, which is dependent on what pretty much you
make pretty much well. I love it also because like
a real scandal I think from the I think it

(27:23):
was in the eighties, is like Nanny's shaking babies to death.
Like the idea that like again a machine that can
only go at a certain pace that's very light. You know,
I get that's a labor staate, especially for like a
single parent or whatnot. Like you know, some some people
will need that, But I just worry. I worry that

(27:45):
we're not all that far from our first and AI
killed my baby. You know, I think I think that
I think the real beauty of this product is usually
when you have a newber, maybe you have to like
watch it all nightcs it'll wake up, you have to
like pick it up, pat it, make sure it gets
back to sleep. You can just leave that baby in
the bed. You can you can like go to the club,
just leave the baby in the bed. If it starts crying,
don't worry. The AI will take the will take over.

(28:06):
We are on the verge of beds that can raise
our children, just like the Venture Brothers. That's right, and
and those and those kids turned out fine, they turned
out great, perfectly. But I think luckily luckily for you,
because I know none of us are babies anymore. But
we are all, you know, eventually going to get old, hopefully, hopefully,

(28:32):
and there is air products that will also assist us
as we get older, using the same AI baby tech. Here.
One of the one of the one of the places
that me and Robert stopped by was called Blue Sky AI.
It's spelled ridiculously offensively, and they refused to do an
interview they were not happy, but I was able to

(28:54):
get a pamphlet and they have an AI that I
think they're mostly targeted to get at like older people.
But quote, by comparing the way your facial and vocal
behavior changes over time, using your facial expressions, facial muscle actions,
as well as where you are looking, your body pose,
and the tone of your voice, we have the potential
to identify and monitor all kinds of medical conditions that

(29:15):
manifest in the face or voice. So it's it's a
facial scanning and voice scanning that uses AI to try
to diagnose you with medical conditions specific specifically, the guy
told us that it's it's useful for Alzheimer's. Then he
realized we were journalists and the nassis to go away.
And also, but yeah, that's how you know you've got

(29:38):
a good medical device, a good product. At CES blue
Sky uses a continuous approach apparent valiance and arousal to
measure to measure expressed emotion. This better fits the real
human experience of emotional states. This approach allows emotion regions
to be defined and to measure the transitions away from
and towards these regions. This continuous approach where appropriate can

(30:01):
be mapped back to a much less exact categorical representation,
for example, excited, calm or angry. Did they have horny?
They do not have horny, not that I can see. Look,
if you know old people, one thing they never stop
doing is funny. Now they do have a list of
all human emotions here that turn it on a map.

(30:22):
Finally that using AI, we can finally figure out what
emotions you're feeling based on your face. So you can
use this just with your with your phone camera, with
your with your iPad camera. They do data collection, data analysis.
One of the weird use cases that we saw was,
I know we saw something similar to this already, but
just scanning your face when driving to tell you how

(30:43):
you're feeling, which is just quite funny. It's a I
could talk about that a second. What this reminds me
of there was a product a few years ago. It
was like a robot for the military, and the idea
was this robot can run in dangerous situations and pickup
troops that have been injured and run them out, which
is probably a thing that will exist at some point
and might even save lives. Right, I can see how
that would be a useful thing, and the military can

(31:04):
be very dangerous to retrieve people. Much better for a
robot to get shot or blown up in that situation
than another person. But to try and comfort the soldiers,
they gave the robot the head of a teddy Bear,
like a metal teddy Bear head. It looked like a
fucking nightmare. It's just like, what, what do you think
did you talk to There's all sorts of guys who

(31:26):
have been shot in combat. Did you talk to one
of them? Did you go with the experience of having
your arm blown off? Corporal have been more pleasurable if
a giant metal teddy Bear entered. So my first job
was working on the characters and twisted metal, but then
I moved into robotics. It's so cool that how many
of these products are very clearly made, funded, prototyped, r

(31:49):
and D, hired PR teams. Everyone's done these big presentations
without talking to a single fucking human being. It's so cool.
It's so cool how much waste there is at this
shoh where not a single human soul there is a
completely different subject. There was like an AI powered nail
saw on thing as well. I saw, and I'm like

(32:10):
That's definitely one where you didn't talk to talk to
any woman though, because first and foremost in my experience,
a lot of women are scared of a new nail
place for fucking up their hands. So are they going
to spend eight hundred goddamn dollars on this thing to
maybe get burnt? And I saw in this article about

(32:30):
it just now that their thing they said was, oh, yeah,
it's like an espresso at home. I've had an espressos
break multiple times, and I realized it may sound weird.
How can you break an espresso? I'm just built different.
But if I can break it in just like me
and strep throat, unbelievable. So I do have one more product.

(32:50):
And then I'm and well, first, Garrison, I know you
have one more product, but we also have one more
ad break. Ah, we're back, Garrison, what's your next product?
So we already talked about the handy, which is you know,

(33:13):
I sure did, which is bye. By all accounts, actually
like works as intended. It's a good product. The people,
the PR people, and we talked to the CEO. We're
not just knowledgeable, but like remarkably good at keeping a
straight face while talking about their jack Well, that's professionalism.
You have to respect it. Honestly, that was the most
professional booth I saw the entirety of ces. They were

(33:36):
really on point. If you are looking for a jack
off machine, I can't recommend anything more highly well, Robert,
except for our next product, which is an AI power
to jack off machine. Thank god. So this is called
my Hixel. It is the first it's the first app
that's an appealing names that's a name that sounds like sex.

(33:59):
It is the first app for climax Control to incorporate AI.
Now I'm I'm gonna I'm gonna read through. There really
redefines edge technology. Huh. I want to make a note
before you get into it. The thing that they're claiming
this is useful for there are devices for and it
is a real use case, which is that like, premature
ejaculation is a serious problem for a lot of men.

(34:21):
It's like it's like a quality of life issue, right,
Like it stops people from feeling confident. It's a serious problem.
There are prosthetic devices people can use to train themselves.
That's fine, they already exist. This is basically like what
if an AI could teach you how to come slower. Yes,
and we have a six step layout here describing why

(34:45):
why my Hixel is right for you. For the first
step is secure and anonymonized data collection, so you can
get O good all of your coming data stored, but
don't worry, it's secure. See. My first question to that
is why is data on me masturbating being collected at all? Well,
it could be because they're putting it towards an eight

(35:06):
week training program. No, So, first and foremost, one of
the first things on the website for this is just
the words happy sex here save sixty dollars and my
Hixel control. But happy sex here is going to be
something I think about for a while. But also it
says it has my Hixel care and my Hixel control,
two different things, and then my hicksl Academy and sadly

(35:29):
you can't click on that because I've never wanted to
know more about how much material could there be unless
a masturbation academy. Yeah, I thought they just called that eton.
I was a British public school joke. It's okay, I
made an edging joke earlier and nobody caught it. Yeah,
I there's one thing in the eating boys do and
they don't have sex, no masturbation. Yeah sorry. Part of

(35:54):
what I hate about this is its name is so
clearly like trying to be respectful and like respectable and
tech product name as opposed to like one of the
things that I respect about the Handy people is they
just went ahead and called it handy. I mean it's
weird because like some of their some of their free
merchere were labeled with stuff like download the app to
control your loads, we bring the game, you bring the joystick.

(36:23):
The first day you went for a run, you couldn't
last more than three minutes either. So it's weird how
they Yeah, I had this very like sanitized branding except
for their like free merch but yeah it has. It
has Bluetooth connection, interactive and personalized settings. You can monitor
your user evolution, and it is it is marked as
a medical device. But on on their brochure there's just

(36:46):
two really really good sentences. There's video feedback from our
sexual health professionals, so after you come, you can get
on a video chat and talk about that. We go there,
we go looking good. It's the load talking ad on.
I'd love to be one of those people. As a
guy man three minutes. You can do better than that.

(37:06):
Come on, they Are you meant to encourage them? Yeah? Yeah?
Are you meant to commiserate with them? Yeah? What is
the call here? Yeah? But also I cannot think of
a single person i'd want to talk about that with. Yeah,
I'm just imagining like the guy in the other and
be like no, no, no no, zoom me the camera a
little more. I want to see those ropes. No, that's
not bad, that's not bad. Good consistency. Okay, let's move

(37:27):
that over. Let's see his O face again. Wow, you
play that, my friend? That your load management is very consistent.
And I think I think we're really missing is how
much how much AI will assist in this because they
claim that using cutting edge technology? Eh eh my hixel

(37:48):
Control is the first solution to include AI and machine
learning for climax control treatment, which is just really really reassuring.
So yeah, it basically looks like a flashlight that connects
to your phone and it's an act app with anatomical
realistic interior design and AI and secured it and and
adanemonized data. I think this is really going to open

(38:10):
up some avenues for sex workers. Yeah, hope, hopefully hopefully Tafia.
It's It's also like the design the handy is very
clearly a robot. You stick your dick inside and it
jacks you off. This looks like a flesh light except
the back and like the front end that we unscrewed
the top and it's like a fake vagina looks like

(38:30):
a fleshlight. The back end looks like an incense diffuser,
like like someone decided these two products needed to be
like what if you could fuck your you're aromatherapy bot. Finally,
so that that is that is most of the the
the just the groundbreaking AI products that I was able

(38:51):
to see today. Does anyone else have any AI products
they would love to talk about? It's time to talk
about Ganerd. I Okayerts, you want to start us off
about Ganert okay, I guess We attended a panel. Which
panel was it, y'all? That was the DHSA AI pie
that was that was the AI panel with one of
the heads of the Department of Homeland Security, who I

(39:14):
can confirm because he turned around to take a selfie
has a Hank Hill ass. He was very insistent on that. No,
but absolutely no. But and I'm saying this not to
shame him, but because there are orthotics for that, you
can get help, sir. That's even a whole episode of
King of the Hill, one of the better episodes good times.

(39:36):
So ganert Ai was announced before this talk that we had,
and it was a I think the guy announcing both
this this event as well as the panel had taken
some time to really focus on the fact that this
was his quote unquote opis his His opis opus. He
said the word opis like five times Ganert's what I'll

(39:58):
be remembered by. This is my legacy. Yeah, and then
I guess two of the designers had come up who
stuck out like a sore thumb compared to the sea
of khaki and blazers and things like that. Yeah. Yeah,
they had clearly never ordered a drone strike, unlike our
hero at Homelands Security. One of them had a wide

(40:18):
brimmed hat that was color matched to the Ganert logo,
which is pretty cool. What does Genert stand for? Ganert
stands for generate, so I think it's actually just called
it generate. They just took out the vowels. But this
is going to be a three day event or a
conference held in Arlington, Virginia. They're claiming that it's gonna

(40:43):
have like two hundred speakers, one hundred and fifty AI sessions,
more than five hundred startups, one hundred and fifty partners,
one hundred investors, and around five thousand attendees. They're trying
to target enterprise, governments, platforms, AI tools, AI builders, services, investors, startups,
and media that it's it's these three events held simultaneously.

(41:04):
Ones just called GOODERT or Generation AI, which is about
just AI AI tech. It's about like AI companies, classes, keynotes, funding,
blah blah blah blah blah. There is then Voice and
AI which is about AI language services. And there's also
one for gov AI, which is about public sector and

(41:24):
how the government's gonna start integrating AI or regulating AI.
And they also have one for coding called code Forward,
and it's it's about where we can't just play the
opening video because opening video had no voice here, but
there's yeah, there's no voice, I can read it though.
Ninety seven million new jobs in AI, five hundred billion
in annual AI spend by twenty twenty seven, two hundred

(41:46):
and fifty billion in VC funding by twenty twenty five.
Gonert generate for a new world in a new market
Goodert connects and forms, elevates and inspires. It all happens
at words, and we cannot emphasize it. Of how they
hyped up vc cash. There was, there was so much

(42:07):
build up for vc cash. I have I have watched
people who are dope sick by Heroin with less jittery
excitement in their hands and eyes. All right, So not
a bit about shit like this. So I just did
a brief cursory look up gener and it's and it's

(42:29):
it's connected Confidence Voice I and gov and code Forward,
and all of them are claiming the following. They're featuring GitHub, Microsoft,
open Ai, Codium tab nine. Their thing on LinkedIn has
twenty eight followers, and their engagement is like when I
post the word twitter on Twitter, it's not very good

(42:50):
at all. I can get more on that doing any
punch picture of my asshole and get more than that.
But also I cannot find a single person claiming to
attend this, despite them claiming two hundred buspeakers, one hundred
and fifty plus sessions, five hundred stars, one hundred and
fifty part one hundred investors, five thousand attendees. I can't
find a single bit of evidence that anyone is ganerting
around at all. And also they claim to have three

(43:12):
different conferences, Code Forward, gove Ai, Voice Ai, and of
course connert Ai and I and of course all of
these are part of the ganert Ai beta experience. I
don't know why you put beta. People are beta as hell.
But also why have you got beta on a conference?
What are you doing? But also featuring open AI and video,

(43:34):
Microsoft Google and veritoon. I'm gonna guess that they've got
like chat, GPT, open on a computer, an nvideo pro
GPU and something Microsoft Word and they've used Google. And
it's very strange because I don't know what this thing is,
you know. I think what it is is some guys

(43:54):
who have a degree of like nay like like some
guys who are are hoping that they don't have any
actual ideas for it to do with AI, so they're
hoping that if they create a conference and make that
be like the cees of AI, they can kind of
force a place for themselves and also attract a bunch
of suction up a bunch of money. I also found
some I found some of the speakers You've got a

(44:16):
fellow called Adam Goldberg, who's an account director and head
of Azure Open Ai Enablement. On the go to market
team open Ai. They found a sales guy from open
ai and then said they got someone from open Ai.
They got someone from JP Morgan Chile's data and AI design.
These are all fake jobs. These aren't real jobs. And
I think that these conferences are amazing as well, because

(44:37):
all people do at them is they go they watch
these things where people go up on stage and go,
you know, generative AI is going to create maybe even
trillions of dollars of value at some point, and you know,
the synergy between generative AI and data collection but also
data silos is going to be truly, truly innovative. And

(44:57):
everyone's like, holy fucking shit, whoa holy shit piss and
then they all post on Twitter and they will forget
it ever happened immediately. Yeah, we call that the dividend.
We do call that the g dividend. So Gert's being
put on by this guy who runs this like panel
collection called Brands gpt at ces with a Z. No,

(45:20):
it's not no Garrison Garrison with a Z. It should
it should be. I think me and Robert both went
to like one or two of these brands GPT panels.
This is the one where Robert got to yell at
Google and Microsoft and get them mad. No, Google and McDonald's.
Mc donald's is ahead of AI, which is a thing,
so they look to basically just focus on like convention programming.

(45:44):
So now they're trying to put on their own convention
that they're calling Ganert instead of just running this brand's
GPT at CES. So that's that's the background. It's it's
done by Mode V events. That's Mode and the letter V,
but one word that's like the parent company for this.
I'll be interested once we get closer to October. I'll

(46:05):
be interested to see if this is looking more like
a real event. It's it's not gonna be that far
for me to travel. But no, they're promising five hundred
billion dollars in annual AI spending with two hundred and
fifty billion new VC cash investments, which is which is
quite promising. Yeah, so hopefully this beta test goes like
the last video game beta test that I went to

(46:27):
and everybody clips through the floor and disappears into a void. Well,
I think that's gonna do it for us in this episode,
and I want to leave you all with well, before
we've got one more thing. But before we get into that,
which which will be fun, I want to talk about
something sobering, which is that, as you may get from this,
nearly one hundred percent of the AI use cases that

(46:49):
we saw presented were either nonsense or incredibly vague. At
these different where you had people from like in Nvidia
and Adobe and whatnot that like they wouldn't say, like,
we're going to use AI for this specific task. They
would say we're going to use AI to get more nimble,
which I think means firing people, you know. Outside of that,
the only real specific use cases that were not clearly nonsense.

(47:09):
We're stuff like replacing you know, customer service workers with chatbots,
which is bad, and to be fair, some also really
good stuff like that telescope that used kind of machine
learning in order to like clean up images so that
you can get better, better images and whatnot when you're
in an area with a lot of light pollution. There
was some stuff like that, but usually very vague. The
use cases for AI was always extremely clear were the

(47:32):
harms and the very first panel we attended there's a
company called Deloitte. They're a huge consulting firm. If you
know about McKenzie, because they're currently somewhat rightfully so a
bit of a bugbear on the left. Deloitte is a
similar kind of organization, right I think they're a bit
less toxic, but to a marginal degree. They're like a
massive consulting firm. Companies bring them in in order to

(47:54):
help them streamline and make processes more efficient in stuff.
And one of their people said that according to their
internal metrics, they expected half a trillion dollars in fraud
this year in one year due just to voice cloning AI.
And that was a more specific statement of what AI

(48:17):
is going to do to change people's lives than absolutely
any positive use case I heard presented at this comfence.
Could you like explain what you mean by voice cloning
so AI. You know, we did a couple of Bastards
episodes talking about scams and like how they've contributed to
the decline of trust in our society. One of the
things that is in the last year or so become

(48:37):
a massive problem is there are now AI things that
can generate a human voice near perfectly to the point where,
especially if it is a voice of say your kid
calls you and they're telling you that they have been
fucking kidnapped or you know, something else has happened and
they need you to wire the money desperately, and you
send them the money, it's a fucking scam, right. That is.
We have a person from Deloitte, and I think it

(48:58):
was a person from Adobe say that they had been
called by a colleague who had gotten like a call
thinking it was that seemed to be them asking them
to buy a bunch of Apple gift cards. Like sit
like this is extreme and it's only going to get
more common. You can automate to the writing of the
scams and the sending of the scams using these AI tools,

(49:19):
and that is absolutely, in my opinion, much more of
a direct way in which AI is going to affect
people than any single product or even cumulatively, all of
the AI products we saw at CE all that uplifting note. Yeah, yeah,
so that's a bummer, and well, we will be going

(49:40):
into more depth about that, but I wanted to end.
Tavia took notes at all of the buzzwords, particularly the
AI buzzwords that we heard during the convention, and she's
going to read that to us. Now. You gotta tell you,
this list is incredible. I've worked in and out of
corporate America, and much like a cult, they have their
own internal vocabulary that they use, and this convention we

(50:02):
went to was just filthy with these buzzwords. So I'm
just going to dig in. The ones that I've written
down are double down. Love that one. That one comes
up a lot. Versioning, versioning, version ing, which is like
a legitimate term in software, but I was hearing it
used in places where it didn't make much sense to
do it. Then our favorite liar's dividend by far the

(50:26):
best term that we've heard at the conference, so flexible. Yeah,
I'm using versions of that and everything. You know, it
makes me think a lot about the murderer's dividend, which
is when you know, I longer I have to deal
with an annoying person. We got content credential, which is
coming up a lot, especially around the topic of AI.
We have data rich and it's sister term problem rich,

(50:46):
core values, which I heard in every single panel that
we were in. Yeah. Usually the context of this was
we don't need regulations around how AI can be made
and put together. The core values of the companies is
what will make sure that AI isn't used in a
harmful way? Great, that's that's gonna happen. No, very trustworthy,

(51:09):
very trustworthy groups, got risk model. And then my next
term is the favorite one. It's so good. I think
I'm gonna give this one to you, Robert, Yeah, because
I don't think we talked about this. Guardian MM or
something like that was then is MM guardian MM Guardian?
Which is an app you put on It's not it
used to be an app. Now it is a phone
you buy for your child. It's a modified Samsung Galaxy

(51:32):
something or other that it's not ax No. Seven. It
gives your It gives you, as the parent, complete access
to your kid's phone and everything they're doing. And it
automatically monitors monitors all of their not just their conversations,
but their browsing history, and sends you alerts. So like,
if someone sends your kid a text that says you

(51:52):
should kys you know, kill yourself. This is the example
he showed us. You get a message that like there's
this suicidal discussion or whatnot going on, we ask them,
you know, hey, Garrison particularly was like, what if this
is a situation where a parent is abusive and like
using this in order to keep tabs on their kids

(52:14):
or like hates you know, is like a child is
gay or trans and their parents are not accepting of that.
Like does this still can parents still like spy on
them over that stuff? Are there any limitations? Are there
any sort of safeguards built in in case a parent
is being abusive, right to like monitor or sind to
the authorities of a parent is using this in an
abusive way? And their answer was no, We're purely about

(52:36):
giving parents more power. And yeah, the term that they
used was tech contracts with children. I can't think of
anything more dismal. Yeah, that is one of the most
dystopian assemblies of words I've ever heard. Should you should
you should never say the phrase contracts with children. That's

(52:57):
just that's just like, if you find your self ever
ever hearing the phrase contracts with children spoken by anyone,
run away for that person as fast as you can,
maybe maybe maybe punch them in the face first, and
then run away as fast as you can. So that's
a good one. That's that's some shit you just keep
in Florida, I guess now or Indiana. It's a super

(53:19):
Florida app that is that is the center of this business.
Moving on, We've got other terms called visionary and thought leaders,
which comes up a lot in these types of I
mean the pr ship people love saying thought leader. I
love it thing, do eat it up. We also have
edge computing, I know digital Yeah again handy, great company,

(53:42):
incredible company, very very excellent product. We have digital twin
horizon scin. So digital twin's really good because it means
like eight different things. It can mean literally a copy
of something, or it can mean a digital version of something.
It can mean like a of US thing. And these
are old different industries using it, and no one can

(54:03):
agree on the meaning. Yeah, that's just tradition. That's just
like what they do. They have horizon scan. I actually
kind of liked that one. Was the first time I
heard that one. When they're just like looking into the future,
I think they're calling that horizon scan use case, which
came up a lot because everyone was groping for use
cases for their technology and didn't seem to have any
that they could bring up. The next one I heard

(54:28):
way more than I wanted to hear which was accelerate.
Yeahs always a great term to hear in tech. There
was so much accelerate and accelerating relating to their tech
development and their tech use cases for another one of
those terms that Tavia just read off. Now, this next
term is a real thing and an important thing, and

(54:50):
not a thing that anyone in the tech industry wants
or cares about. The right to be forgotten. This has
actually been legislated. The reason they have to care about
this to some extent is it's been legislat in the
EU right, and it should be everywhere. I actually think
this is an incredibly important concept, and it's basically the
you know, we have people go viral that become a
main character on whatever app for being a piece of

(55:13):
shit sometimes or sometimes doing something stupid or sometimes doing
something innocuous that for no reason at all makes a
huge number. He's actually a really good example. There was
a kid who posted a video of himself and it
was like four point o GPA had a job, braised
money didn't get into Harvard or something. He didn't mean
it in this way, but someone took it and then
turned it into ay, why kids are being kept off

(55:34):
Harvard thing? And he dm them was like, you're ruining
my fucking life. Yeah, this is how this, like the
right to be forgotten should be everywhere. Yeah, is not.
It is a hugely important thing. And you know, I
actually give the EU a lot of credit for the
fact that that has to some extent been legislated. All
of that needs to be more common in other countries
and more vigorously enforced. I don't I say that I

(55:57):
have no idea how you do it with the internet
working the way it does. Some of this, I actually
do think is a values thing where we all need
to be more okay with the fact that people, even
people who can do something shitty online, deserve to not
have that necessarily define the rest of their lives, especially
you know, teenagers. And the next one is one that

(56:19):
I like to associate with my posts, data poisoning. I
believe every time I interact with Twitter or blue Sky,
that is what I am doing. I have some data
poisoning death, or I am data poisoning as a verb,
or I am data poisoning myself. Yeah, and then we've
got oh, Garrison, you want to do this one? Sure?

(56:43):
These These are the last three that I got from
an AI Ethics Panel. We have data silos, how data
is all separated. We have data harmonization, kind of the
opposite of data silos. Yeah, that's basically using AI to
generate pictures of dan harmon Right. Yes, then we have
the last term, which I will I will describe for

(57:04):
you the speed capacity gap. So the speed capacity gap,
I know I can answer that for you. So sometimes
when I'm doing a shitload of amphetamines that I purchased
from some Turkish website via the dark web, you know,
I'm doing them with a friend and they o d
because there's a day there's a speed capacity gap between

(57:26):
the two of us. Yeah, that's what that Uh, that's
what DHS guy was talking about. For using AI to
monitor dark web purchases. He's going to really get on
that one. No, speed capacity gap the gap between tech
acceleration and the capacity of society to keep up and
make informed decisions about the technology, which is actually kind

(57:46):
of a useful terms. It's it's just one of those
you know, it sounds like a silly tech term, but
when the when it's actually explained, like, oh, that's actually
a really good way to think about the way AI
is being pushed in all of these new ways, and
are we actually as a society, whether that's like as
a government or just like culturally, able to actually make
inform decisions about how we want this tech to be

(58:06):
integrated into our lives. And now the dark side of
this term the speed capacity gap. For the to kind
of solve this gap, we can either slow down a
development or we can speed up our capacity, and the
panelists obviously preferred the latter, and so we should just
speed up our cultural capacity. Did they propose a solution

(58:28):
for that, Well, kind of, but it's it's a little unclear.
We can go through my recording at a later day
once we do our full AI episode. But they're rationale
for why we should instead of instead of slowing down
tech development instead speed up our cultural capacity is because
of the many benefits that tech improvements can be made

(58:50):
via tech iterations. Right, the more iterations you get of
technology that the more benefits are able to get from
said technology. A versioning y version exactly, which brings us
all the way back to versioning there we go, which
brings us all the way back to turkisham fetamines. Because
I've been for the last twenty years trying different versions
of turkishamphetamines and the blue pills. Man. You know, normally

(59:13):
you don't hallucinate on speed, but when you take enough,
it turns out you can. And so I think what
I'd like to leave everyone with is the knowledge that
turkisham fetamines are a thing you can purchase on the
dark web and should There's no health consequences to it
at all. I'm not part of this byroh Flyne does
not support illegal drug purchases. Respective podcasts. They're not illegal

(59:37):
if they're so new that the DEA hasn't banned them yet.
That's innovation exactly exactly. That's versioning, and that is the
speed capacity gap folks that the DA can't keep up
with the tech improvements. All right, everybody that's gonna do

(59:59):
it for us here at cool Zone. Before we leave,
I want to give Tabia and Ed both chances to
plug their pluggables. ED. People are going to be hearing
from you every week on your new show, Better Offline,
which is launching in a what I'm sure you'll agree
is a frighteningly short time be soon. It is going
to be the best weekly tech show. It is going
to do the job that no one is strong enough

(01:00:20):
to do, which is ask questions, listen to the answers,
then actually make a question that follows them. I'm very
much looking forward to this and very excited to work
with the cool Zone team and Tavia Oh. You can
find me on Twitter at cutma and if you want
to learn a little bit more about my interactive and
immersive work, you can see that at tabimora dot com.

(01:00:43):
Now you may wonder why I didn't give you any
links to anything, and that was a deliberate thing called subterfuge.
But you can find me at where's your ed dot
at edzitron on Twitter, x rateminutes dot biers and of
course plue sky Zitron, dobisky dot social. Yeah, and you
can find my profile on hand. All right, we're fucking

(01:01:06):
done here. Welcome to Nick What Happened Here? A podcast
about I don't know. This is gonna come me out
like Tuesday, right, maybe Wednesday. You probably know what this

(01:01:29):
podcast is about. If you don't, It's about things falling
apart putting it back together again. I'm your host Mia Wong.
With me is James hi May and I'm very excited
to uh to lend some stuff. I'm sure it'll be great.
No nothing, Well, okay, the good news that the first
guy we're talking about died. That's that's the only good news. Great, great,

(01:01:53):
more good news. But we're doing some episodes about the
Daily Wire. Uh, you're gonna get a lot more actual
stuff about the Daily Wire in the next two episodes.
This is the this is the preliminary background information episode.
But you know, for people who aren't familiar with the
Daily Wire, the Daily Wire is a very large and
very powerful right wing media empire. They're you know, Ben

(01:02:15):
Shapiro's people. Matt Walsh is there, and they are. They've
become increasingly powerful because of their ability to drive the
actions and sort of like not even really mid level
like high mid high level like Republican officials, particularly at
a state level, towards you know, horrific anti trans policies

(01:02:38):
stuff like that. Yep, they've had as the incredible divorced
dad power of those two guys. Like it's like a yeah,
it's like a Pokemon situation, you know, like that, It's
just it's inside, it's like shaken ball, but sometimes they
let it out and control their Republican body with it. Yeah,

(01:03:00):
and so okay, you know, but in order to really
sort of understand who these people are and why they're
able to sort of be like this, we need to
talk about the ways that this is new, because you know,
there's always been sort of writing like Christian media figures
who do terrible stuff, but the way the daily wire

(01:03:22):
works is different than this stuff has worked in the past.
And in order to understand what is different about this
than these sort of like previous eras of like Christian
antiquer violence, we need to talk about neoliberalism. So this
is this is not the normal starting place you're talking
about the religious right, but if you want to actually

(01:03:44):
understand what's happening right now, you have to go back
to the origin and structure of neoliberalism so you can
understand how it shaped right when Christian organizing in the
last about fifty years. I want to start this by
talking about a guy who is not normally considered part
of the Christian right at all. In fact, he's not
even an American and his greatest influence is on his
home country of Germany. The man I'm talking I want

(01:04:06):
to talk about is Wilhelm rope Key. I've mentioned him
on this show before, but that was several years ago.
Now he is not a very well known figure, and
that's not good because he is one of the smartest
and one of the most dangerous neoliberals. So in order
to really get a sense of who rope Key is,

(01:04:28):
we need to talk about the beginnings of neoliberalism. So
we need to talk about Hyak and his sort of
attempt to recruit a bunch of new liberals to oppose.
While mostly to opposed communism, it later becomes about also
opposing fascism. But the problem that Hyak has is that
so in the nineteenth this is happening in the nineteen
twenties and really the nineteen thirties, the problem is that

(01:04:50):
the people who Hayak have been trying to recruit from
Germany dream the thirties all joined the Nazi Party. So
in many such cases, Yeah, it's a real issue for them. Yeah,
once again the lips have let us down. Shocked. Yeah,
So you know, in the in the nineteen forties after
the war, when Hayak is trying to do this again,

(01:05:10):
he turns to William Ropeke instead of the original guys
who've been Nazis, because Roke had been out of the
country for the whole Nazi things. So he kind of
had skipped out on it. Okay, smart, move on his foot. Yeah,
and you know this, this gets him an invite to
like Montpellier. And so the whole sort of the origins
of neoliberalism and rope Key is he's one of the

(01:05:35):
architects of what's called orderliberalism. So the order Liberals are
one of the factions of you know, they're one of
the factions of neoliberalism. What's interesting about them, We're gonna
talk a bit about what they believe. But what's interesting
about the order liberals is that they're not really economists.

(01:05:55):
I mean, some of them are, but it's a lot
of sociologists. And this means that the way that they
think think about the world is very different than the
way that like Hayek or you know, like a like
von Mises or like all the you know, the sort
of like mainline like guys who are economists in the
neoliberal movement think. The order liberals believe that there is

(01:06:16):
a natural capitalist hierarchy in a society that produces stability.
But they also understand that capitalism in general and neoliberalism,
like specifically the thing they're trying to bring about, adamses people.
You know, it destroys social bonds, It tears the fabric
of communities apart, and it destroys the notion of any
collective self identification, replacing them with sort of market exchange

(01:06:39):
and empty consumer symbols masquerading his identity. You know, thing
for example, the rise of stand culture or I mean,
god like the thing we do, which is like, yeah,
going to say streamers, you know, so that's friends are
on your phone. Yeah. So this is extremely bad, and
rope Key realizes this is a real issue for the

(01:07:03):
success of neoliberalism, because people don't actually like being completely
autonomized market agents with no real social relations other than
wages and contracts. And you know, if presented with these options,
they might, for example, turn to communism or God forbid anarchism. Yeah,
but Roki, you know, Rokey is on the side of

(01:07:23):
bad and the side of bad. Yeah. The great title
for the episode side of that, it's me as biography God.
Roke's conclusion from this is that you can't just rely

(01:07:44):
on the market passively coming into existence, because if markets
were supposed to passively come into existence, or if they
were you know, like the sort of like spontaneous order
thing that Y talks about when he's lying, Like if
that was actually true, they would just have they would
be everything would be market economies already. Yeah yeah, yeah,

(01:08:07):
yeah yeah. It's like no, like we would have had
the exact same economic and political system for the last
thirty thousand years, but we haven't. So in order to
do this, you have to make people into good neoliberal
market subjects, and this requires the intervention of the state.
The product of this is that ro Key is one
of the architects of what's called structural policy. These are

(01:08:27):
these are specific state policy things that are used to
create markets by you know, sometimes it's it's there's a
whole variety of sort of ways that this happens, but
by acting on and transforming like physically people right like
what they do, what they believe, how they congregates, like
what things they're allowed not allowed to do, what things

(01:08:48):
are incentivized. This this is structural policy. This is the
origin of what's later going to be called structural or reform,
which is the kind of stuff that the IMF does
to an economy to create markets. By taking food for
the mouths of babies, and making the babies work to
get the food. Yeah, it's great, it's the only way. Yeah.
And that part of neoliberalism broadly, a lot of that

(01:09:11):
comes from order liberalism, and it comes from people like Roke.
But Ropeke realizes that, you know, there's there's a problem
of structural policy as an abstract concept, right, which is
that in order for it to work, you need to
a take control of the state, because again, this is
a state, but there is a top down state reform project, right,

(01:09:35):
and b there has to be something beyond the state
to create the kind of subjectivity you need to instill,
you know, to instill in people to make them behave
quote unquote as market agents. Right. You can't just use
the state in the market to make people behave in
the way that they're supposed to, you know, to be
good sort of like workers for the workers for the
great market. You need something else, is specifically, neoliberalism needs

(01:09:59):
its own form of collectivity. It needs its own thing
that creates social bonds between people. It needs its own
kind of sort of identification to combat the sort of
collective society of the left. Now part of Roke's plan,
and this is something you share us with the other
orderliberals is that they want to do this with you know,
they want to use the patriarchal family and small businesses

(01:10:20):
as like the sort of social basis of all of
their sort of right wing politics. This is very durable
rating politics stuff they also have. Weirdly, this is one
of the things it's in the fifties and sixties is
there's a lot of sort of on every side of
the political aisle, like kind of romantic utopianism ish about
like the countryside, ya. You know, this can swing wildly

(01:10:43):
between like Mao or like the Japanese fascists or the neoliberals.
So they have this dream of sort of turning rural
areas into these like bastions of like reaction against the left,
and that did kind of happen in the US, but
it didn't happen like it happened because the rural economy

(01:11:04):
was completely annihilated and replaced with like a series of
meth labs. Not because I guess technically was a downstream result.
It's just that it didn't. It wasn't the sort of
idyllic like good like farmer family things that these people wanted.
So yeah, yeah, they they got there in an interesting way. Yeah,

(01:11:26):
with like massive agri business and meth labs are your
two choices in life? Yeah, and like and you know,
so like like yes, they this is one of these
things where instead of achieving their goals through cultural means,
they achieved their goals through like the massive uh like
unbelievable economic violence. But you know, okay, so that's that's
the other thing. That that and that's all sort of

(01:11:48):
standardne liberal theory, right. But what makes rope Key kind
of unique is that she's really one of the first
of these people to realize that you need another force,
and that force is the Church. And this is something
that people don't talk about a lot when they talk
about neoliberalism, but a lot of these people are very

(01:12:08):
very deeply Christian. Here's Roke talking about his ideal society,
quote rendering to the king what is owed to the king,
but also giving to God what belongs to God. So
what belongs to God? Now one now I'm concerned. I mean,

(01:12:31):
he's it's funny because like he's taken the Bible verse
like that he's taking to the render under Caesar, like
what belongs to Caesar render und blah blah, blah blah blah.
But like it's he's made it enormously more alarming. Yeah, yeah, deeply,
like cause like like the thing about the render under
Caesar is that that's a statement about about like living

(01:12:53):
under the Roman Empire, right right, Like this is just
he just wants you to fucking have a king, yes,
give shit to everyone needs a god who is also
the king. Right, it's not even like like the necessity
of the state thing, like you just dump dumped in

(01:13:14):
like a pointless, hereditary, inbred person to give money to. Yeah,
I mean she's not like, so okay, I should I
should probably not slander him as thoroughly as I'm doing here,
because I don't actually quite think he literally becomes a monarchist.
But she does believe that there should be like I

(01:13:34):
don't know, you describe it like there should be democratic parties,
but that like actual economic policy shouldn't be like managed
by them, Like you need like a super thing above
the democracy, which is the IMF, to make sure that
there's the little the little democratic people don't like start
getting any ideas about the economy, like a technocracy like

(01:13:56):
a yeah, yeah, but like the thing with the technocracy
and this is this is genuinely kind of what has
been happening in Europe is that like living under a
technocracy really sucks. Like it sucks like politically, it sucks materially,
and it sucks like emotionally. And you know, the right

(01:14:16):
has been able to make a lot out of sort
of like this opposition to like the global bureaucracies or whatever,
which is like, okay, like you guys maade these things
in the first place, Like I, I, you know, you
don't get a fucking complain about the bureaucracies that you
set up and ran, but you know I haven't stomped him. Yeah.
But but rop Key, rope Key. You know, so a
lot of the other order liberals become really sort of

(01:14:38):
like you know, are become obsessed with taking over the IMF,
which they do, and they take over the World Bank
and they become you know, they do that stuff. Rope
Key is obsessed with using the with using religion as
like another kind of social force that he can bind
to the other bull sort of movement together with, and
so he sets out to form like like a react

(01:15:00):
kind of like reactionary Catholic international to bring the ioliberalism
to the world that is a troubling concept. Yeah, so
it doesn't work, which is the good news. Well, and
the problem is it doesn't work. It's not that it
doesn't work because it's a bad idea. The reason that
it doesn't work is that he's trying this in like
the fifties and sixties and it is too early for

(01:15:21):
that shit, like you know, I mean, and it's something
I feel like I should at some point, I should
actually do a deep dive into this on the show.
But I've talked about this a couple of times. There
is a very powerful form of kind of like conservative
Christian politics in Europe at this time. It's like the
Christian democracy movements. There's like if every single country if

(01:15:41):
you look at it like this, from like the fifties
through like the nineties, I mean, and even to this day.
In Germany, for example, like there was a party called
the Christian Democrats. Yeah, and they win like at least
sixty percent of all elections, like in Italy, they're in
power for like forty years. But the problem with Christian
democracy from the perspective of someone like Roki is that

(01:16:02):
like if you if you take like these parties, right,
these parties are you know, these are these are the
Christian Conservatives of this era. They are way way too
far left for uh, for Roki. And that's not just
the sort of like Rope look got how far right
rop Key as although he is so like if if

(01:16:24):
you took Elder Moro, who's like the great Italian Christian
democratic statesman, multiple time Prime Minister of Italy killed in
an insane web of conspiracies, like if you yeah, look
like if you took Elder Moro and you dropped him
into the modern American Congress, he would be to the left.
He is again the leader, he's like the leader of
Italian well he's technically from the central left faction of

(01:16:47):
the Christian Democrats, but he's like the guy who's not
a socialist or a communist, like in terms of Italian politicans,
who's not also a fascist. And if you took him
from like the seventies and you plopped him into the
American car he would be to the left of AOC,
like AOC is pro cease fire in Gaza, right, like
she she's pro cease fire in in Palestine. Aldo Borrow

(01:17:09):
allowed the popular threat for the Liberation of Palestine, which
is the Palestinian Communist pera military to operate out of
and carry out attacks like from Italy. Right, like this
guy you would like she is, well, if you go
far enough, right, you might get that as well. To
be fair, no, but but it wouldn't be the PFLP though, Yeah,

(01:17:30):
I guess, I guess some of the German neo Nazis
kind of liked them, but right, yeah, yeah, Like like
imagine in the US any politician being like, yeah, the
PFLP could operate out of the US or only our
only our only condition is that we like we're gonna
let you operate, but we're not gonna like protect you
from uh like shim Bett or whatever, like the masade, Yeah,

(01:17:52):
like racking pack you from the massade like that. But
you know, you can you can do your stuff here.
Could you imagine that shit happening? This guy was, This
guy is a conservative in Europe right in He's like,
you know, so this is what Roke's responding to. You
like the existing Christian you know, and you know, to
some extent, like the Christian the Christian Democrats are very

(01:18:15):
very successful stopping communism, right, They're really good at it.
They stop communism from taking hold anywhere in Europe, but
they're not like capitalist enough for Roke. So when we
come back from this thing Roki would have loved, which
is ad transitions, we're going to talk about more of

(01:18:38):
what Roki was doing and how it shaped neoliberalism and
the Christian right. Woo yay, we're back. Rochi is having

(01:18:59):
a great time. Is Grave. We're gonna get the thing
that makes them spin it his grave, which I'm very
excited about accent. But Okay, so you know, like as
we've sort of been talking about, the Christian Democrats are
not the Christian the Christian Democrats and a lot of
countries are Catholic, some of them, like I think, like
there are Protestant like Christian anectionsmen, but like yeah, but

(01:19:23):
like a lot of a lot of them are Catholic.
So I mean, it's it's it's a really interesting kind
of like predecessor to like modern fire right politics where
you get these like both of the US and Latin America,
will you get these sort of like these Catholic Protestant
alliances like this is this is like Matt Walsh, you know,
we're gonna be talking about more in the next two days,
like is a Catholic theocrat, right, but a lot of
his base are like you know, are like Baptists and

(01:19:46):
like the more even more feral charismatic Christians and like
you know, but but you know, but these these groups
are able to sort of work together, but they're not able.
They're not working together with it. Roki wants so. And
this is the thing that I think is very very
scary about rok and and especially about the people who

(01:20:07):
took this model right, whether explicitly or implicitly, people who
people who figure out the same because a lot of people,
some people like kind of directly go for Roky. Some
people discover it through like I very weird readings, right
wing readings of Gramsci. It's a whole thing. I'll talk Yeah,

(01:20:28):
one day, I'm gonna get Eve on the show and
we're going to talk about that, because it's fucking wild.
What the yeah, wow, I think that Gramsky is not
the most like inaccessible you know, like it. You know,
there are some like left theorists who just just vomit
words so much so you can just project a meaning

(01:20:49):
on it. But I have not their thing. This is,
this is eve Angers like thesis is that these people
saw that, like leftists are reading obviously read Gromsey and
we're like, we're going to do the right wing version
of this. Okay, yeah, so now it's yeah, but you know,
so some of these people are rediscovering the same things
that Ropi has figured out in like the fifties. But

(01:21:11):
the thing that Roki is doing is he she's figured
out all the essential elements of the modern Christian right.
You promote neoliberalism with one hand, and then you sell
the solution to the atomization that your neoliberalism causes on
the other hand with the church and the church, yes,
we will serve as the basis of your political organization. Yeah,

(01:21:31):
that is that is a there's a way of doing it. Yeah,
and it's an interesting there's a lot of people who
do this same thing. Like at some point I'm going
to finish my I'm going to write the thing about
like this is actually what libertarianism is for a broad extent,
is that libertarians are the people who like take the

(01:21:52):
problems that the market produces and then try to sell
you a solution which is more of those same problems
but worded differently. Yeah. Yeah, so with people that weed now,
so it's fine yeah, but but you know so, but
this is this is the Christian version of it. But again,
rope Key to a large extent is smarter than the
people who come after him, because he understands that this project,

(01:22:17):
this this this sort of Christian deliberal project is a
constant struggle against adimization. That and and this adamization has
to be actively politically combated by the Church, like both
politically and socially. And if it's not like actively combated
by the Church, this whole project is going to start
to come apart. Now rope Key is not the man

(01:22:40):
who's going to lead the mob of Christian fanatics into
the Promised Land. And part of this is also because
he is like too racist for like the sixties, which
again like so like in the parts of the sixties
when he's saying the really racist stuff like segregation is
legal in the US, right, like yeah, like that this

(01:23:01):
is this is this is where we're at with this.
He's too racist for that. And the thing that he's
really really racist about is Rhodesia. Oh fucking hell, I
didn't expect appearance. Yeah, yeah, this is this is the
Rhodesia pivot, which is that like okay, so the orthodox neoliberals,
people like Hayak are pro Rhodesia, right, And this is
a Milton friedmand that these people are pro Rhodesia, but

(01:23:23):
they're smart enough to use dog whistles and talk about
it in terms of like economic terms and like stability
of gar and blah blah blah blah blah blah. Roke
is just openly saying race warship, like I'm not gonna
read it, but he is effectively like the spiritual forefadder
of like the four Chane mass shooter. Like that, that's
how racist he is. And you know, it turns out

(01:23:43):
that just again openly like open race war ship is
like too much for Hyak, and he gets kicked out
of the manju m liberal organizations and tragically, tragically for
all of us, Rokey dies before you can see his
beloved Rhodesia reduced to a pulp by the series events
IMPERIALSS insurgencies. He dies. He dies before all of the

(01:24:04):
Rhodesian or like society's fucking fuel supplies stored in one
spot or blown out. I say, see, if they'd had
a more distributed market economy, maya, they would have had
just just that all their fuel in one giant bottle
which they burned. Spoiler love for anyone who hasn't been
following the history of Rhodesia, not the country anymore. Yeah,
thank Christ. I actually don't think Christ. Fuck Christ, Christy

(01:24:27):
new ship. Yeah, thank all those people who went out
there and killed bigger list, et cetera. Yeah, and of
course all the American people who went over to join
the Rhodesian military and killed other white Rhodesians by accident,
by shooting at people who were theoretically on their side. Yeah,
shout out to them. We're not going to get into
North Korea backing another genocide in Zimbabwe here. That's also

(01:24:49):
a fucking thing. I've not doing apologies for that because
actually fucking sucked. Yeah, but you know, Okay, but he
he dies before he can see his beloved Rhdesia fucking
eat shit and die. But what Roki had is a
very clear version of the hierarchical neoliberal society that he
wanted to create. Right, and he is very especially by

(01:25:14):
the end of his life, he is very explicit about
what this is. It is a Christian, white supremacist, patriarchal
world and to build it, the right is going to
have to use the church to stave off the alienization
and adamization of capitalism, and we're back now in order

(01:25:40):
to build this new world, the world that Roke sort
of imagines, the religious right, the actual religious right that's
going to bring this up into fuition, sets off from
a number of angles. I think the most famous part
of this is probably the sort of moral majority infrastructure,
which is this network of like think Tank's political advocacy
organization's TV networksailing lists, like their own insane right wing colleges. Yeah, god,

(01:26:06):
terrifying places. But the fundamental social basis, right, the fundamental
collective space around which the right is organized was the church.
There's been a lot of sociological talk in the last
few years about like quote unquote third spaces. So the
third space is supposed to be this place that's like
not the home or not the workplace that people can

(01:26:27):
exist in inform bonds in, and you know, people talk
about like bridge clubs, blah blah blah blah blah. But
the thing about the US is that like the fucking YMCA,
like all of these things that people talk about as
the third space are just the church in different forms. Literally,
church or a bunch of church run events. Yeah, especially

(01:26:52):
like the more like rural you get like it is, yes,
and this is this is one of these things like
that this was actually like one of the sort of
rear flame to the workers movement, right, which is that
like in large parts of Appalachia, right, you have a
bunch of really really militant like miners unions for example.
But then you know, but all of them are also
like are also are also Baptists. And that is fine

(01:27:13):
as long as you know you're you're you're dealing with
Baptists who are doing well. I mean, I say fine,
but like it's not an existential threat to the workers
movement when you're dealing with like like you know, like
it's easier for an arrow to like, sorry, it's easier
for a camel to walk through the head of a
pin than it is for a rich man to go
to have in Baptists. But the moment that still starts flipping,

(01:27:34):
that's a very very dangerous sort of rear guard. You
see this Nasian American communities where like you know, Asian
Americans generally, like the last two generations like Millennials and
gen Z are tacking really really hard left, except the
fucking Christians who are like forming this for this insane rearguard.
Because I've complained about this before, an fucking I'm doing this,

(01:27:55):
this is this, this is a Christianity episode. I could
talk about this that the thing to think about Asian
Christians is that they're all they're almost all like first
Chen converts, so they all have convert brain, which means
they're completely fucking batshit. Yeah. So you know, and this
is one of the things that we're talking about here, right,
is that the physically the church serves as this very
very important engine kind of kind of revolution. It serves

(01:28:17):
this engine of sort of spreading reactionary politics even among
groups of people who you normally wouldn't get that kind
of sort of right wing politics from. And this is where,
you know, face face with the sort of leftward shifts
in the US and the sixties and seventies globally too,
a face with you know, I mean literally the specter
of revolutions and not even like sometimes not even in

(01:28:37):
specters like you know, this is post sixty eight, right,
there's been a bunch of actual uprisings. Yeah, and they're
the place that they make their move is by trying
to seize control of various pieces of church infrastructure. We're
going to take a Catholic example and a Protestant example,
and we're not going to do the obvious Orthodox example
because we'd be here for a fucking century. So let's

(01:28:59):
start with Roki beloved Catholic Church. I think I don't
know if I'm gonna do a little bit of left
inside baseball. I think people on the left tend to
be really obsessed with the like liberation theology people. But
the problem with liberation theology people is that they were
around for maybe like thirty years, right, but by the

(01:29:21):
time you get to the end of the eighties, these
people are all dead, right, Like they're either dead or
they're like Ortega, and they've become these like literally they
start calling themselves the Third Way and are like cutting
all these deals with like really right wing social groups.
And so this means that the dominant politics of like

(01:29:44):
the capital like t Capital c. The Catholic Church is
very gets very very right wing. Well it's not even
that as much as it gets right wing, but it
is very right wing, and that they're doing is very
very scary. One of the things that I don't think
people really realize. Is that so that probably you've heard

(01:30:07):
the term gender ideology, Yeah, yes I have. Yeah, do
you know where that's from? Is it from? I've fucking
forgotten the place where Harry Potter goes Hogwarts. Yeah. JFK
is a fucking Johnny come late bastard. Like she she
she got into this game after that ship had already started.

(01:30:29):
Gender ideology is a term k rowling. Jfk rowling is
powerful speak like this. The term gender ideology comes from
the Catholic Church, and it's developed in reactions specifically to feminism,
and very specifically it's developed in reaction to to arguments

(01:30:52):
from feminists that that, you know, that gender is socially constructed,
you know, because in the Catholic church's position is like,
well no, that's herradic because obviously gender was assigned by God,
and because gender just signed by God, like women are
like you know, women are like like submissive blah blah
blah blah blah. Yeah, like naturally, this is this is
the natural order. This isn't like a sociologically constructed thing.

(01:31:14):
This is the natural orders. Always been in talis, always
billy b because they're like Nike unfathomably sexist. Is this
like around there, like Elaine Pagel's beef with the Church,
I'm not sure of Blaine Pagel's. If me with Elaine
Pagel's God the Father Got the Mother, I think this
is a bit before my time. Okay, yeah, yeah, this

(01:31:36):
is uh the World's History stands at the University of
California in common topic. Well, I think I think this
is actually in the same I've played videos of her
to my students, and definitely in the eighties, like the
vibe is powerfully eighties. Yeah, so I guess that's a
bit late because so a lot of the general all
this stuff comes out of the early night. Well, I
guess it's like early nineties. Okay. So one of the

(01:31:59):
things that happens is that a lot of you know,
in the nineties, the Catholic Church, and they have a
bunch of like radfem allies here. By the way, do
you have this massive fight in the un about like
recognizing the right to abortions and other like sexually reproductive rights,
And the Red Fems are pissed off because I mean

(01:32:23):
there's a whole so they've been they're aligned with the
Catholic Church is like an anti sex work thing and
like an anti porn thing. And then also like a
lot of the redfems. Well, I get I've gotten so
much trouble for saying this, but like, holy shit, there's
somebody those people are insanely technsphobic. Yeah damn wow, but
you know, but like this is this is this, There's
this massive battle inside the United Nations between a bunch

(01:32:45):
of feminists and or like feminist who are like normal
and then like the shitty RATFM factions and the Catholic
Church on the other side, and Pope Benedict in particular
goes like all out on this stuff, both on the
international level and intern with like local churches, like goes
on the offensive against abortion in queer liberation. And meanwhile

(01:33:05):
the Protestant Church is doing like exactly the same thing.
They're like pro except like I think, I think, like
even more fascist, which is really really and I say
this is someone who has raised Lutheran like that that
is really the core of Protestantism is like what if
we did Catholicism but like somehow shittier, like like Martin Luther.

(01:33:26):
One day I'm going to do my thing on the
world's greatest kind of revolutionaries, and then one of them
is Martin Luther because oh yeah, very cley, because like
like I might, my argument for this is that the
greatest kind of revolutionary is the person who starts out
at on on the side of the revolution and then
turns against it. And so Martin Luther's thing was he
was trying to outflank the Catholic Church in the sixteen

(01:33:47):
hundreds from the right on anti Semitism. Sorry, I meant
a sixteen sixteenth century fififteen hundred, fifty hundreds, which is
even worse, fifty hundreds Catholic Church they have expelled, they
have like the of the this is this is in
the period where they're like expelling all of the Jews
from Spain, right, and Martin Luther's trying to like flank them,

(01:34:07):
and this is the kind of shit that's happening like
in the US at this point, which is you know,
this is this is this is the this is the
Protestant sort of following the Catholic like why and in
some ways blazing their own trail of of going really
hard right. So probably the most famous and I think
definitely one of the most important examples of this is

(01:34:29):
the right wing seizure of the Southern Baptist Convention in
nineteen seventy nine. So for people who don't know about
the Southern Baptist Convention, they are a very very large
and influential like group of Baptist churches, and they've been
kind of like they'd been anti segregation, they've been sort
of like trending left, and there's this is one of

(01:34:51):
the things. This is a very very famous thing in
the history, like if if you're you know, it's sort
of like the history and mythos of the right wing
is like in nineteen seventy nine, at this convention, these
like there's like these group of pastors who are like, ah,
the church is getting too woke or getting too left.
They scrolled out this plan like on a fucking napkin
to like how they were going to take over the church.

(01:35:12):
And they do it. They see they see control of
the Southern Baptist Convention and they purge all of their
enemies and it is very very quickly, within a matter
of like a couple of years, it's converted into this
factory for right wing violence. Yeah, they they are They
ruthlessly purge acting thiscent in the churches. A bunch of
churches leave because they're like what the who the fuck

(01:35:34):
are these people, like just these absolute right wing fanatics.
Is like I've taken controls. A bunch of churches leave,
but a lot of them stay, and you know what
they're what their project is is that they start creating
these sort of totalitarian micro states, like in like this
is this what they turn churches into, and this is
what they turn households into. Because these households become enormous

(01:35:55):
centers of abuse, like just unfathomable amounts of violence. Cant
sort of get get sort of spread out of this stuff.
And you know the way that these things work, right
is is is you may have seen I have you've
seen those like fucking deranged umbrella memes that the Christian
right makes on Twitter. No, I think, so, okay, they're

(01:36:15):
supposed to be like these like umbrellas, and there's likely
or the umbrella like protects you from the things. So
there's like the family and it's had the family, they're
like protected by the authority of the husband. You're protected
by the authority of the church, protected by the authority
of like the theocratic state. Okay, no, this is like
the most cursed Russian doll. It's awful. And this is

(01:36:36):
just what these people believe, right, and and they they
enforce this through psychological and physical violence. These people are
they're sending out instruction manuals about how to beat your
children right, and how to do it in ways that
you won't get caught, you know. And like what I'm
saying that these are like totalitarian micro states, that's not
an exaggeration that that is what these households are. Like,
they're unbelievably violent. You as a child, there's under constant surveillance.

(01:37:00):
You're literally forced to through physical violence to maintain their
gender norms. And this is the base of the Christian
of the homophobic Christian right. These churches are pumping out shocktroopers.
And these are the shocktroopers both of neoliberalism and homophobic
and transphobic violence. And when I say shocktroopers, I do
mean this literally. Because an enormous number of these people,

(01:37:20):
and this is part of the reason's politics, it starts
to fall apart. Like I grew up around these people.
A lot of these people went to fucking a rock
and got the absolute shit blown out of them. But
you know, these people, like these these churches, this is
you know, you can look at the sort of panopoly

(01:37:41):
of the people who do right wing like homophobic violence,
right the queer basher, the peroneu kicks their kid out
of their homes for being gay, the homophobic boss who
fires and abuses queer workers, the doctor who assaults us
and then denies his medical care. These people are pumped
up by the church. And what the church is doing
here is they're serving as the equivalent of sort of
of unions in the left right. And when I say unions,

(01:38:02):
I'm talking more like the nineteen oh seven iww of
in like the twenty twenty three AFLCIO. These churches are
the social and organizational space in which the right constructs
its world right, it's the sort of nexus of homophobic
organizing from the beginnings of the homophobic right through like
their fight against gay marriage. But Kaba, something happened that

(01:38:24):
Ropeke well, I think rope Key might have suspected this,
But something happens that his inheritors did not expect. And
that's something is the only thing I failed to consider
is what if neoliberalism came for the church so one
of the things that has happened in the last and
I mean literally we are talking the last ten years

(01:38:49):
or ten to fifteen years. Really the last like ten
years church attendants and this is also actually true well
of sending out on mosco attendants with the church tendants
has been declining way more. It used to be like
you know, if you're are you a member of a
church moster synagogue r like Gallup has been pulling this
since the fucking forties. It used to be the rate
of it of being a member of a church, synagoguara,

(01:39:09):
mosque was it was for like basically until like two thousand,
it was hovering around seventy percent. It's now forty seven.
That is a catastrophic drop. That is a rewriting of
like fundamentally what the US is. The US has been

(01:39:32):
a like Christian health state like since it was created,
right like the US is founded by like religious extremists
whose problem is that they weren't allowed to pursue Catholics enough.
So this has been this has been a church country
more so than like most of the European countries. You
did the settling up until literally the last twenty years,

(01:39:55):
and the drop between twenty ten and now is like
fourteen percent. And this is this is and it's not
just that the membership rates are going down, like the
actual actual church attendance is going down, and so and so.
In this context where less people are going to a church,
less people belong to a church, the political strategies that

(01:40:18):
have been based on using the church as like you
default social network. Uh, they don't have the kind of
reachs that they used to. Yeah, and if that's your
political strategy, this is a catastrophe for you. Now you know,
we can talk. There are like, there are lots of
reasons this is happening, part of which it's sort of
like the secularization of the US. Part of this is

(01:40:40):
that there's been so many fucking atrocious abuse scandals in
these churches that people are just fucking leaving because that's
what happens. Yeah, you know, And one day, one day,
the thing I really will get canceled for is when
I'm gonna the episode I do about how this happened
in the DSA and how it is hauled out the membership,
because you know, it turns out when people get abused,
they just fucking leave. Yeah, not just the d I say, like, unfortunately, Yeah,

(01:41:02):
this happens in so many organizing like this is on
the left, Yeah, stopping fucking creeps. Yeah, but like you know,
fellows sist dudes. Yeah, the Christian right has particularly bad
because they don't they did therever address it, right, this
is part of their ideology is that this is good. Yeah,
that's the problem, like at least in the left, Like

(01:41:24):
it keeps fucking happening, and we do recognize it's bad.
We sometimes just seeming to people on the left are
repaired to allow it to happen because I think it's
not as bad as the alternative but which is bullshit.
But yeah, when you have a church which actively kind
of encourages it, then that's actually and and and part
of and the other. The other thing that's happening here, right,
is that like the other thing that's generating this is

(01:41:45):
just there's just the neoliberal adamisation of society, like it's
it's tearing apart sort of like social bound you know.
And and I mean one of the things I think
you have to be careful of when you talk about
neoliberalism tearing about social bonds, is that not all a
lot of those bonds sucked like it was not good
but everyone with seventy percent of Americans were going to church, right, Like,
not good at all. That sucked. It was deeply evil.

(01:42:08):
But you know, it tears apart like it tears, it
tears apart bonds, not entirely without regard to ideology, but
it still does do it. And this means this context
has completely reshaped what right wing like anti career and
anti transorganizing looks like. And the right right now, the

(01:42:29):
right solution to that is the Daily Wire, and we
will get explained that in very great length tomorrow and
the day after that, So stay tuned. Does the entree
of the bad guy, Well, we already had a bad guy.
I guess he's dead these ones, Yeah, this is the
bad guy number two, yeah, three, four, maybe after the

(01:42:54):
Catholic Church and the Southern Baptist Convention. Yeah yeah, they're
right up there there. And they've still got time too.
You know, they're already only in their ascendency, so we
shouldn't judge him too, Eddie yep, but yeah, this has
been naked happened here, go make these people's lives miserable. Yeah, yeah,
Ben Shapai is miserable because I write a piece of

(01:43:15):
mechanics about how to tag down a statue and he
is still mad about it because he said, I can't
wait for their piece about mods of cocktails and I
never wrote that as well. So Ben Shapira can suck it.
Thank you for the career help of Ben Shapiro. Ah,

(01:43:45):
welcome back to it could happen here a podcast about
things falling apart. And whenever you have things falling apart,
you have the Daily Wire. I don't know, Garrison, what
are we talking about today? Yeah, the Daily Wire has
been our trusted companions among the rise of the alt

(01:44:09):
right and this kind of just impending sense of bad
that has been, you know, increasing the past five ten years,
twenty years, thirty years. You know. So Mia in the
last episode talked about some of the neoliberal conditions that
kind of led to this dip in church attendance and

(01:44:30):
it's resulted in the Christian right kind of changing formations
in a few interesting ways, and we're going to talk
about that here, but now more specifically about how The
Daily Wire has been able to profit off of this shift.
So as third spaces, including churches, die off, online spaces

(01:44:52):
have been gun to fill the gaps. From Facebook groups
to content creators to conservative streaming services, the organizational hub
of the far right has been picked up by opportunistic
bloggers and aspiring movie moguls. Which brings us to twenty thirteen,
a perfect year. Nothing went wrong, just a normal, normal time.

(01:45:15):
So in twenty thirteen, we had failed screenwriter Ben Shapiro
and a failed movie producer, Jeremy Boring. They started working
together on a project called Truth Revolt. Now I assume
most of us are somewhat familiar with Ben Shapiro. He
was an editor at Breitbart. This he started as a

(01:45:36):
young conservative blogger who gained prominence in the two thousands.
In the twenty teens, So I'm not gonna waste too
much time going into the background of Ben because I'm
I'm guessing we all basically know who Ben Shapiro is.
But I'm also guessing that almost no one listening to
this probably knows who Jeremy Boring is, hence the name.

(01:46:00):
So I'm gonna be focusing a lot on Jeremy. I
I find Jeremy to be a kind of fascinating person.
I I almost weirdly enjoy watching his stuff just because
I find it to be extremely fascinating. His demeanor, his
his his way of going about creating a conservative media empire,

(01:46:21):
I find to be really intriguing. I've I've watched Jeremy
Boring stuff just as like a voyeurist observer for years now,
and he's actually starting to become more of a prominent
face among the right wing media ecosystem, or at least
he's he's been putting his face out there for a while.
Most of the time he's just been behind the scenes.

(01:46:41):
So Jeremy Boring is just a is a is A
is a good Christian boy from a small town in Texas.
He got involved in kind of local town. Yeah. I
I forget the exact town because I didn't I didn't
write it down in the script, but I believe it's
somewhere in West Texas if I remember correctly, it's it's

(01:47:01):
it's It's been a while since I watched the two
hour interview with Jerity Boring where he discussed his upbringing. God,
I wonder if it's Lufkin. I'm pulling it up. I'm
pulling it up Slayton. Okay, okay, well still a dogshit Texas. Yeah,
See that's why I did mention it because its like
who can's in Lubbock County, min love it. Yeah, he
was kind of involved in some local community theater productions

(01:47:24):
as a kid, and like a lot of kids, he
aspired to be an actor. So as a young adult
he moved to LA He very soon gave up acting.
I think he had one small bit role as like
a crying soldier, but besides that, he just couldn't get
any work. So instead he just he decided to become
a struggling screenwriter. Classic classic move. Yeah, moving from a

(01:47:49):
failed actor failing yes, yes, yes, exactly. In the early
two thousands, he got invited to a Hollywood Bible study
group with a whole bunch of like young C list celebrities,
and over time he evolved into a sort of pastoral
role within the group. And then in two thousand and seven,
he was able to write and produce his first movie, Spiral,

(01:48:11):
starring Zachary Levi, who now played Shazam in DC's movies
and really nothing else because he seems to be a
deeply unlikable person who's not really been hired in many
other things. But Zachary Levi was also in this like
Christian Bible study group. They were both friends, him and
Jeremy Boring, So they made this movie spiral. It grossed

(01:48:35):
just over three thousand dollars. So not the smash hit
that you know you would you you would hopeful for
your first movie. That is, uh yeah, that's not great.
It's not it's it's not it's not perfect. Now. Jeremy
Boring claims that his religious and political beliefs made it
so that he wasn't able to progress very far in

(01:48:57):
the Hollywood system, but he was invited to a secret
meeting of conservatives in Hollywood called the Friends of ABE
that Robert you should you should look up the Friends
of ABE logo because it's really good. Oh my god.
I think people like like, uh like John Voight and
just you know those sort of like yeah, it sounds

(01:49:18):
like I think John Voight would be a member of Yes, yes,
I'm pretty sure John voyightt was a member of this group. God,
they're and they're treating it. They're treating it. There was
like a Friends of something or other group that was
like an underground group providing reproductive healthcare service back before abortion,
back for Roe v. Wade, which is clearly what they're
Oh god, is that who made this logo? This is

(01:49:40):
like bad clip art. Oh my god, it's it's quite good.
So he was he was invited to this secret meeting,
the Friends of Abe, and this is where he met
another friend of the pod, Andrew Breitbart. So this is
this is actually really a really important Grammer was a
member too, yes, a very important weird subcultural community within Hollywood.

(01:50:04):
So as Jeremy was trying to move into just movie producing,
he was actually asked to take over this Friends of
Abe group. So he became a very central role and
he made a lot of connections, connections that will soon
become important when we discuss the Daily Wires own adventures
in movie producing in the next episode or so. So

(01:50:25):
he took over this group. Eventually he had this other
smaller Bible study group, So he's kind of moving up
in the world of conservative secret meetings in Hollywood. So
because he met Andrew bite Bart at the Friends of Abe,
Andrew bite Bart obviously knows Ben Shapiro because Shapiro used
to be the editor at Breitbart News. Also, I feel

(01:50:47):
the need to note the Friends of Abe was founded
by Gary Sinise, who was in such beloved movies as well.
I think the only beloved movie he was in was
Forrest Gump, where he played Lieutenant Dan. Oh he did Bobe. Yeah,
this is Lieutenant Dan founded the group, which is actually
like Lieutenant Dan would be in the Friends of Abe,

(01:51:10):
so that kind of fits. He also had apparently a
bit roll our some role in Apollo thirteen. I forget
who So there you go, Gary Sinise great. So around
this time is when Ben Shapiro and Jeremy Boring first met,
just before like twenty ten. I think the two met

(01:51:30):
via Andrew Bitepart, whom Ben was working for at the
time at Brightbart News. Now. Jeremy and Ben hit it off,
and they decided that they would want to work together
to create media to quote unquote influence culture. That's a
term that Boring uses quite a lot, is like influencing culture. Now.
Boring was very impressed by Shapiro and sought to propel

(01:51:52):
Shapiro's fame and wanted to create a platform and wanted
to create a platform to increase Ben's ability to impact
politics on a larger scale. He really thought he saw
something in Ben that, if utilized, could make Ben into
a pretty major celebrity. Boring was friendly with board members
of the David Horowitz Freedom Center, an extremely racist, anti

(01:52:16):
Muslim right wing think tank I believe based in law.
Boring thought that Ben and David had a lot in common.
They were both very like politically feisty Jewish conservatives in
the LA scene, and Boring wanted to prepare Ben to
sort of carry the torch of the Freedom Center using
all of the resources that David Horowitz have built up

(01:52:36):
over a long period of time. So for about a
year and a half, Boring met with board members behind
the scenes to create some sort of buy in and
cast Ben Shapiro as the future for the Freedom Center,
planning seeds of what it will be to come. Eventually,
David Horowitz chose Ben as the heir to the Freedom
Center first by giving Shapiro and Boring an opportunity to

(01:52:59):
test things out by starting a company under the Freedom
Center called Truth Revolt. Truth Revolt is something that I
didn't I think I saw it a little bit when
I was like a younger teen, but it wasn't It
wasn't super popular. Truth Revolt saw some initial success as
like a conservative quote unquote news site aimed at exposing

(01:53:20):
leftist media. Shapiro billed Truth Revolt as the quote unquote
anti media matters Now, Shapiro admits that Truth of Volt
ultimately wasn't very sustainable because the whole website was designed
around trying to generate traffic by being linked by Drudge Report.
And at the time that's like literally literally like a

(01:53:42):
third of right wing media in the early two thousands
to mid auts Like that was Alex Jones's whole strategy
for a while too. Yeah, the whole point was creating
headlines that would be linked by this conservative news aggregator.
And this isn't a very sustainable business model, at least
that's what Ben claims. And because truth Revolt was operating

(01:54:03):
under the Freedom Center, it was run as a nonprofit
and received very limited funding and little to no advertising budget.
But even back then, there was a big focus on
creating video content to fill out the site and grow
its own YouTube page. I have a wonderful screenshot here
of some old truth Revolt videos from like nine ten

(01:54:25):
years ago. We have brass tax on immigration. Andrew Clevan
I think his name is Clevans. He's one of the
main Daily Wire guys now, but he was involved way
way back then. He has a video on Obama conspiracy theories,
which I'm sure that's great. Yeah, I can't wait to
dig into that one. Ben Shapiro has a lot of

(01:54:47):
videos about why Jews vote leftist. We have videos about
Hillary Clinton, we have the left's magical thinking. There is
another Andrew Clavan video called fIF D Shades of Barack Obama.
So again, all like very very like twenty twelve type
stuff here, like all all very like early early twentyighteenth.

(01:55:11):
They were iterating, they were cooking. They were cooking, and
like cooking, sometimes your first attempt doesn't really work out.
Truth of Volt started declining in around early twenty fifteen,
but Jeremy Boring was working on a business plan with
a more marketing driven approach. Instead of relying on like
nonprofit annual donors, Boring wanted to use a more of

(01:55:34):
a for profit model where they used ad revenue and
the larger web traffic generated through marketing on social media,
especially on Facebook, to pay for this entire media operation. Now,
the old guard of this conservative think tank did not
really like this plan. The Freedom Center actually fired to
Jeremy Boring when he produced this plan to revamp truth Revolt,

(01:55:56):
and soon after Ben Shapiro stepped down. This was in
April twenty fifteen. Jeremy Bort. Jeremy and Ben attempted to
buy out the site, but that didn't pan out, and
eventually Truthful to just withered away. Do you know what
else slowly withers away over time? Uh? You without the

(01:56:17):
products and services that support this podcast. That's right, all right,
we are back. Thank the maker for all of those
wonderful products and services that let me spend about ten

(01:56:38):
hours a day watching Daily Wire videos so I could
write like four thousand words. Truly, this was This was
Sophie's grand dream when she began this. Just have a
wall of computers constantly playing Daily Wire plus exclusive contest.
That was the pitch we came to corporate with, what

(01:56:59):
if we expose demand to all of the Daily Wire
one could possibly consume? Hell? Oh, by all right, So
Jeremy Boring, failed movie producer, failed screenwriter, has been fired
from Truth Revolt. Ben Shapiro, his colleague in arms, steps
down in solidarity. We love to see workers unite. So

(01:57:20):
Shapiro and Boring still liked their plan to use ad
revenue and social media advertising to make a for profit
media company. So in twenty fifteen they looked for other
investors to fund a new website, and it just so
happened that around this time, two Texas billionaires known as
the Wilks Brothers We're looking to use their fracking fortune

(01:57:41):
to quote unquote influence culture. There's that term again. Through
a mutual friend, Boring was able to secure millions of
dollars in seed money from the Wilks, who also later
went on to fund prager You. With an influx of
cash on hand, Ben and Jeremy started The Daily Wire
initially just as a conservative news site, but with ambitions

(01:58:04):
to become an entire conservative entertainment production and distribution house.
Instead of relying on donors or links from news aggregators,
their new approach was focused on creating and cultivating a
long term audience. They first prioritized quote unquote investing in
making Ben and other up and coming conservative figureheads more famous,

(01:58:28):
in particular using an intentional social media strategy to propel
people from out of the conservative bubble into the popular zeitgeist. Specifically,
Jerry Boring worked to increase the personal brand awareness on
sites other than Twitter, where generally most of these writers
spend most of their social media hours. The point was

(01:58:48):
to not just do it on Twitter, instead it on
the other social media sites where actual, like regular people
spend more of their time because it's mostly just other
writers on Twitter versus the the actual audience that the
Daily Wire wanted to attract were mostly spending their time
on places like Facebook or Instagram. So fourteen months in,
the Daily Wire was already cash flow positive, and we

(01:59:12):
see this approach of specifically trying to like create celebrity.
It really paid off if you look at how the
how like the cultural figure of Ben Shapiro specifically kind
of emerged in the mid two thousands, Like he became
such a such like a meme with such like a
recognizable character through very simple marketing on like YouTube on Facebook.

(01:59:35):
It was. It was wildly successful. You cannot open up
YouTube without seeing a Ben Shapiro destroys college student on
campus video, like every single every single time. Now, on
top of making a news site, they also decided to
move into podcasting, a very controversial medium. I'm gonna I'm
gonna read one quote from Ben here. Quote one area

(01:59:56):
that we had no idea was going to be the
center of revenue was the actual podcast. When I look
back at that business plan, what we get allocated for
the amount of revenue from the podcast was minimal compared
to how successful the podcast became, and that cannot be understated.
The Daily Wire makes a shitload of money on their podcast. Yeah,
we all were surprised by how lucrative prop podcasting wound

(02:00:19):
up being like because it was around for like a
decade or so before it was before people were really
making any money off of it. It kind of snowballed
very quickly once advertisers realized it was something they could
get in on. But like it was, there was a
long time where it was just sort of like a
thing weird little guys like Joe Rogan did and most

(02:00:41):
people didn't really think about them much. Yeah, and their
social media advertising plan also worked outrageously well, especially on Facebook. Routinely,
over the past few years, stories published by The Daily
Wire received more likes, shares, and comments on Facebook than
any other news publisher by a wide margin. Shapiro has

(02:01:02):
more followers in The Washington Post. Their engagement outpaces the
New York Times, The Washington Post, NBC, CNN, and Fox
News on average by over ten Times, and they often
get more clicks on their articles than all of those
outlets combined. They have like they figured out a really
successful method to promoting their news content in a way

(02:01:24):
that really no one else has been able to replicate.
Utilizing provocative rage bait propagandized by a select few of
online personalities, the Daily Wire has been able to expand
the brand recognition of not just their own site, but
also the personal brand of its own hosts. Ben and
Jeremy brought over some of the people from Truth Revolt,

(02:01:44):
but they were also scouting for new talent among the
twenty sixteen conservative sphere to invest their newly acquired fracking
resources into. Another quote from Ben is like surround yourself
with people who are going to be successful unquote, particularly
not like going after people who are currently popular, but
trying to find up and coming content creators who they

(02:02:07):
think they can turn into being much more successful than
what they currently started as. Among the people they recruited
was the relatively unknown extremist Christian writer and radio talk
show host Matt Walsh, who we will get to in
a sec the slightly more famous blogger Candice Owens, who
was picked up a few years prior by the conservative

(02:02:28):
student group Turning Point USA to be their quote director
of Urban Engagement, which is an awful title what they
mean by I wonder what they mean by urban engagement.
And then in twenty twenty, after being a Daily Wire
correspondent for a few years and helping to launch Ted

(02:02:49):
Cruise's own podcast, the Daily Wire hired failed actor Michael Knowles,
who's basically a discount Matt Walsh, to host his own podcast.
And finally, in twenty two, the Daily Wire recruited Jordan Peterson,
probably their biggest get to date after he quote unquote
retired from the University of Toronto. The original funding pitch

(02:03:12):
to the Wilkes Brothers, who are looking to influence culture,
explicitly positioned the Daily Wire not just as a news site,
but as a prospective alternative to the liberal Hollywood monopoly.
There there's a really interesting quote here from Jeremy Boring quote,
I think there is a path for conservatives to create entertainment,

(02:03:35):
but I think you have to go about it in
a roundabout way. We need a marketing and distribution mechanism
that allows us to actually put an audience on the target,
because Hollywood will never cooperate. Even if you managed to
make a great film, they'll never cooperate. They'll make it
very difficult for you. With Ben, and with what we've
been doing at Truth Revolt, we can make something that's

(02:03:56):
capable of marketing whatever we produced thereafter for this particular
audience unquote. So there he's emphasizing that, no matter the
quality of the actual content you create for this sort
of conservative media ecosystem, you first need to actually build
an audience that will be able to find it. That's
like their first step is building up this audience and

(02:04:17):
then they can focus on actually making the content just
because of how this distribution system works. That at least
that was that was Jeremy's take on that. Do you
know what else is really important for building up a
sustainable audience? Products that's right, trustworthy products and services that
our audience knows are of fantastic, fantastic quality. It's the

(02:04:41):
it's the only way. We are also supported by the
Wilkes Brothers, but but directly through selling hydraulic fracturing technology.
So rack your backyard and join the fractvolution. We're fracking

(02:05:04):
back here, all right. That was just a wonderful a
wonderful frack break. My back feels is so much, so much,
so much more loose. After that, I cracked for like
the house across from me exploded when fracturing fluid released
natural gas that was then ignited by an oven. Speak of,

(02:05:26):
speaking of fracking, I think we're both actually, even though
we're on different sides of the country, we're both in
like a ridiculous cold freeze right now. It's it's it's
pretty cold. Yes, it is twenty two degrees right now. Yeah,
it's like sixteen or something here. Yeah. Yeah, and you're
in Atlanta, so you are the last person alive in

(02:05:46):
the entire city. Yes, but no, I'm sure fracking has
done nothing to contribute to this anyway. So let's let's
turn our dials now to twenty two once again. Normal year.
Nothing bad happened, just a fun time overall. In twenty

(02:06:07):
twenty one, The Daily Wire relocated from liberal Hollywood, California,
to Nashville, Tennessee, with hopes of creating their own conservative
entertainment empire in the music city. After over half a
decade of building up an audience, the Daily Wire started
to shift towards creating in house entertainment media like movies

(02:06:29):
and TV, as well as producing their own neatly packaged
documentaries to serve as a cultural catalyst in a way
that a daily podcast show like The Ben Shapiro Show
just can't write like we put out a daily podcast,
and because it's a daily show, it can only have
a certain level of impact for all the things we
cover in a way that you know, a highly produced

(02:06:52):
documentary can have like a little bit more like easily
observable impact just because of how it's being packaged. So
they saw this and decided they wanted to start putting
a lot of resources into their own documentaries as well
as their podcasts. But it wasn't just documentaries. In twenty
twenty one, they also distributed their first movie, Run Hide

(02:07:13):
Fight thirty eight percent on Rotten Tomatoes. It is a
school shooter thriller movie that I have not watched. I've
watched a lot of the Daily Wires original content. I
am not watching Run Hide Fight. I'm sorry, I'm just
not doing it. Yeah, I don't really want to watch
Diehard with school shooters and a teenage girl. That seems

(02:07:36):
a bit on the nose. No, I just I simply refused.
Four other original Daily Wire movies have come out since then,
which we'll get to some of those in the next episode. Now,
before twenty twenty, the Daily Wire was making some exclusive
content behind like a membership paywall for something that they
called Daily Wire All Access. But us twenty twenty one

(02:08:01):
and into twenty twenty two, they rebranded and pivoted hard
into promoting their own subscription based streaming service, The Daily
Wire Plus. Again, they are nothing if not original. This
was during a wave of plus branded streaming services. We
have Disney Plus, we have Paramount Plus. I'm sure there's

(02:08:21):
probably many others that I'm just not gonna bother even
looking up. But the Daily Wire Plus the hit new
streaming service that I'm sure your great uncle has quote.
The Daily Wire Plus is the streaming home of The
Daily Wire, Jordan Peterson Movies, Praeger, You, and Daily Wire Kids.

(02:08:43):
We're one of America's fastest growing media companies and counter
cultural outlets for news, opinion, and entertainment. We're building the
future you want to see unquote. That's their their little tagline. Thrilling. Yeah, truly,
the new line cinema of racism. Such groundbreaking original content

(02:09:06):
includes My Dinner with Trump. Oh my god, I hadn't
even heard of that one. Are you fucking kidding me? No,
I'm not kidding. What is it? Is it actually on
My Dinner with Andrea parody or is it just something
completely disconnected that they stole a famous title for. They
just stole the famous title for damn it. It would
be really funny if it was just a shot for

(02:09:27):
shot remake of My Dinner with Andre but with but
with Andrea as Trump, Like I would. That's respect that's
actually respectable. That would I would watch that movie tonight. No,
it's it's it's just a film to Dinner with Trump
and like various political advisors. Oh my god. Yeah, Oh
that's so lame. Do I? I don't believe the Daily

(02:09:52):
Wires releasing their streaming metrics. Just like Netflix, they're keeping
them secret. Similar companies, Yeah, very similar. We have other
other hit hit documentaries like Kanye West's Favorite, The Greatest
Lie Ever Sold by Canda Sowans. Oh God, an extremely
racist misinformation or sorry, disinformation documentary about about George Floyd.

(02:10:17):
We have that Mandalorian actresses movie Terror on the Prairie.
We have a whole bunch of a whole bunch of
stuff from Jordan Peterson after he left uh the University
of Toronto and got and got kicked off Twitter. That's
the exact time that he was hired at Daily Wire.
He's a whole bunch of stuff of just like roundtable
discussions on like the Bible, and I believe he has

(02:10:40):
that dragon mythology. Oh, it's great now that that's that's
a good show. I've watched all of that one that's
kozy and we enjoyed ourselves quite a lot. We have
We have a making a Murderer ripoff documentary by Canda
so Owens called Convicting a Murderer. Again, truly original stuff. Great,

(02:11:01):
but it's not just movies, TV shows and documentaries. It's
also like like we mentioned, they're hit podcasts quote. The
Daily Wire plus podcast network is America's sixth largest podcast
publisher and produces several of the top ranked podcasts in America,
including The Ben Shapiro Show, The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast,
Candace with Candace Owens, The Matt Wall Show, The Michael

(02:11:22):
Knowles Show, and The Morning Wire, some of which do
quite well on the charts and are often sometimes sometimes
beaten by Robert's podcast. Anyway, So a little over a
year ago, the Daily wire Plus passed one million subscribers.
We don't have any updated numbers on that, so it's

(02:11:44):
probably quite higher now, but at least as of as
of around a year ago, they had a million subscribers,
and again, as of back then, it was bringing in
the company two thirds of its annual revenue. I think
it was like three or so years ago they were
making one hundred million dollars a year, so they were
making bank across their podcasts and exclusive content. They have

(02:12:08):
over three hundred employees and are still growing and are
investing hundreds of millions of dollars into producing original entertainment content.
In their efforts to influence politics through entertainment media, they
strive to create cultural events around the release of their
original documentaries. The biggest success they've had with this is

(02:12:28):
what was in twenty twenty two with What Is a Woman,
which rocketed the Daily wire Plus into the online spotlight
and proved there was great success to be had with
this style of aggressive anti trans advocacy. The film also
put the previously niche figure of Matt Walsh on the
map and established Walsh as an authority in queer exterminationist campaigning.

(02:12:52):
I've known of Walsh for like the past decade. After
he had a short lived radio career, he made a
name in Christian circles as a provocative blogger, sort of
like a young firebrand of the Christian right. In the
early twenty teens, he had a brief stint at Glenn
Beck's The Blaze before being recruited to The Daily Wire
in twenty seventeen to do a daily podcast. The goal

(02:13:15):
of documentaries such as What Is a Woman beyond growing
the Daily Wire's a subscriber count, is also to encourage
real world action while converting attention from the documentary into
actual real world harassment campaigns and live events, which fuel
even more content. It's like this, It's like this weird
content circle that the Daily Wire does. They create content

(02:13:36):
to make these real world events, which then can fuel
more content. It's this perfect loop that generates them a
lot of money. On October twenty first, twenty twenty two,
the Daily Wire put on a quote rally to end
child mutilation at the Tennessee State Capitol, which was streamable
on Daily Wire Plus exactly. This is a perfect example
of creating this event that then allows them to also

(02:13:59):
create exclusive content for their own streaming service. The Daily
Wire has been in cahoots with the state government of
Tennessee ever since they first moved their headquarters there. Back
in twenty twenty one, the General Assembly and Governor drafted
a resolution welcoming the Daily Wire to the state. Jeremy
Boring regularly gets invited to dinners at the Governor's mansion.
After the release of What Is a Woman? The Governor

(02:14:22):
of Tennessee announced an investigation into a transgender health clinic
in Nashville, and Walsh has made appearances at official state
press conferences, and Tennessee's legislator has led the charge on
following the Daily Wire and Walsh's political program to target
trans people, ban drag shows, and lobbying school boards to
ban LGBTQ materials in schools. The Daily Wire was they

(02:14:47):
were kind of wise to not get too caught up
in the TRUMPI and Mud from twenty sixteen to twenty twenty,
instead instead focusing on broader culture war issues ranging from
anti liberalism, antidiversity, parental rights, religious rights, and attacks on
LGBTQ people. But that also means that they didn't peak

(02:15:09):
during the Trump era in the way that a lot
of other conservative content people kind of did. They chose
not to capitalize on the Trumpian alt right moment, and
they were way too smart to go full qan On. Instead,
they were kind of waiting on the sidelines, slowly growing
an audience to eventually find the right moment to catalyze
more widespread support and thrust themselves into the spotlight, which

(02:15:34):
they have now done by crafting antiqueer propaganda to pick
up the baton from the dying QAnon movement while moving
the needle away from like explicitly q brained shit to
simple stuff like parental rights and the more socially acceptable
groomor and save the children talking points. The once more
exotic target of pedophilic elites has been shifted to simply

(02:15:57):
any random queer person, which is a much more tangible
point of iyre and that'shere we're gonna leave us here today,
kind of on the point that The Daily Wire waited
and found the moment in like the first year or
two of the Biden presidency to really push themselves to
be the own spotlight instead of just relying in the

(02:16:17):
shadow of Donald Trump in the way that someone like
Tucker kind of has now done. He's not nearly as
popular as he was in twenty seventeen, twenty eighteen, twenty nineteen,
and The Daily Wire is now massively influential in a
way that they were only kind of rising to prominence
back during the Altright era. So in the next episode,
we'll talk a little bit more about The Daily Wire's
own anti queer advocacy and their push for original content,

(02:16:42):
including a brand new child focused to streaming service, which
I will talk about in the next episode. Anyway, Robert,
do you have any do you have any thoughts on
the Daily Wire? Well, I know that the child grooming
service they're building, a big part of what they're looking
to do is try to copy the show Bluey, which

(02:17:03):
is like the biggest thing in children's entertainment right now,
and just casual knowledge of where that is talking to
parents and stuff about Bluey, Like, I feel like it
might be a bridge too far for them, because they're
they're they're they're trying to go after they're trying to
capture like market from something that's legitimately really fucking good,

(02:17:25):
as opposed to just putt it like they're they're kind
of most commercially viable movies like the School Shooting Movie
are from what I've read in reviews, like just kind
of normal mid movies. Like they don't necessarily feel like
a daily wire movie. Man, there'll be a couple of
points in there maybe, but there they could more or
less pass for something you'd see on Netflix or Amazon

(02:17:47):
Prime or whatever, which is you know, if you're competing
with mid grade action movies and the like that that
are a dime a dozen, you can actually do that
fairly well. And it's even possible to, like well, the
economics of streaming are actually deeply obscured, but theoretically it's
possible to do as well with that as Netflix does
with it, right because people, But if you're trying to

(02:18:09):
replace a children's show that, like kids consume voraciously and
are deeply in love with and is really well made,
I think that's actually a lot harder than they're guessing
it's going to be. Like, yeahd adults who want something
to watch when they're drunk at night are a harder
audience than little kids who are obsessed with a TV

(02:18:30):
show that is the best in its market. It's certainly
a gamble, and we will talk more about the details
of this gamble in the next episode, as we will
also eventually eventually talk about their brand new movie that
came out last month. Lady Ballers. All right, we're done.

(02:18:51):
I feel like I should call hr just because you
mentioned the name of that movie. See you in the
next episode. I started the episode Garrison, really really what

(02:19:20):
an energetic entry into I'm tired. Tell me things that
make me sad. Oh, I don't worry, I will. That
is my favorite thing to do. Let's let's yeah, let's
talk about things that are actually sad for the first
first half of this episode. You know, the past few years,
it's kind of been increasingly profitable to be friendly to

(02:19:44):
the gaze, which is kind of a new trend. You know,
if if you look at the past twenty years or so,
it's becoming more more profitable. Which if you're if you're
like a queer accelerationist anarchist, maybe maybe that's a bad thing, right,
But if you're just trying to like not get killed
in the interim as the climate collapses, it's you know,

(02:20:04):
maybe a good thing. That generally queer acceptance has been improving,
but as it's been improven There's also been a pretty
sizable backlash from some members of the Christian right who
don't really like this or are trying to use this
backlash as a way to promote their own economic interests.

(02:20:28):
And I don't think this needs to be an either
or I think this can definitely be a both scenario.
Speaking of Matthew Walsh, the Catholic self described fascist, this
is going to be kind of the the topic of
the first half of this because he has been able
to the work he's done, has been able to really

(02:20:49):
propel The Daily Wire as an actual like political entity
in a way that Shapiro just never really has. Shapiro
was really good at creating eye catching a YouTube clickbait
and stuff, but we never really saw him campaigning hard
for any political cause. He was never really doing that
type of stuff. They come at of different eras in

(02:21:12):
different communities. For one thing, Ben Shapiro is Jewish and
came of age and came into prominence in the early
two thousands when conservatives had political power but basically zero
like social power as they saw it, right, and so
he was always positioned as like, I am sort of

(02:21:33):
the I'm the insurgent conservative, like I'm Rush Limbaugh. You know,
I'm going to provide a safe place for you, even
though you control the government to a large extent, where
I can yell at and make fun of the people
that you think are bad. Right, And that's that's the
only thing he ever really sought to do, is like lol,
liberals dumb. Walsh comes out of the Christian kind of

(02:21:56):
dominionist adjacent movement at the very least, and their goal
has always been capture the seven pillars of culture, right,
And so he from the beginning has thought of this
more as like I am waging a Christian war against
secular society and doing so like kind of methodically. So
they just kind of have approached what they're doing fundamentally

(02:22:18):
from a different way and came into it at different times.
Walsh is definitely the most evangelical Catholic I've ever seen,
and which is weird because like back when he was
a popular Christian blogger, his stuff was very popular in
evangelical circles, even though evangelicals generally are not very friendly
to Catholics, but his stuff was widely shared because he

(02:22:40):
was quite provocative. Now, he spent a few years just
kind of laying low running a podcast at The Daily
Wire and then What is a Woman? Really? Really propelled
him into the spotlight and he got a glimpse of
fame and popularity that he's been endlessly trying to replicate.

(02:23:00):
And because this fame was based around hating trans people,
that is what he's decided to pivot his whole career
to doing. That is now his entire focus in life
is about how he doesn't like trans people because it
was very profitable for him. In twenty twenty two, so
as a part of an ongoing right wing harassment campaign

(02:23:22):
against TikTok influencer and chronic theater kid Dylan mulvaney, Matt
Walsh started a viral boycott campaign against bud Light for
having a brand partnership with a trans person. Now, I'm
not going to spend too much time here talking about
right wing boycotts. I'm sure we've all watched, you know,
like Nike shoe burnings and Gillette razors being flushed down

(02:23:42):
the toilet and people dropping their Kere eggs off rooftops. Generally,
boycotts don't tend to work, but this bud Light thing
did show some success, and success in this instance specifically
refers to Walsh and the Daily Wire cronies receiving a
lot of attention and free publicity, so they sought to

(02:24:03):
replicate this strategy while publicly telegraphing their harassment methodology. Here's
two tweets from Matt Walsh quote, here's what we should do.
Pick a victim, gang up on it and make an
example of it. We can't boycott every woke company, or
even most of them, but we can pick one it
hardly matters which and target it with a ruthless boycott campaign.

(02:24:24):
Claim one scalp, then move on to the next. Our
goal is to make Pride toxic for brands. If they
decide to shove this garbage in our face, they should
know that they'll pay a price. It won't be worth
whatever they think they'll gain. First bud Light and now Target.
Our campaign is making progress. Let's keep it going so
as Walsh's said there, Walsh's next target was Target the

(02:24:48):
Department Store, due to the store's history of prominent Pride
displays in the lead up to Pride Month during twenty
twenty three. Target was met with online and in person harassment,
with a wave of emails and calls to individual stores,
accusing them of grooming and indoctrinating kids with the presence
of Pride themed apparel. People started ransacking stores, destroying pride displays,

(02:25:11):
threatening violence against employees in person, as well as calling
in multiple bomb threats into into many, many different stores,
mirroring the harassment campaign against trans clinics and hospitals the
year prior, which was also spearheaded by Matt Walsh. We've
seen this tactic game prominence. This bomb threat tactic is
now quite common among the right. We saw it be

(02:25:33):
called into there was there was a lot of bomb
threats called into like four hundred synagogues this past winter.
That was, you know, most likely done by some form
of neo Nazi. But we've just seen this, this specific
bomb threat tactic pick up a lot because it provides
a pretty sizable minor or short term disruption to regular,

(02:25:56):
regular services. Now, in response to this wave of harassment,
Target Corporate mandated that many stores remove their front of
store pride displays in late May, all across the country,
but especially in the South. Target released a statement saying
they were quote making adjustments to our plans given these
volatile circumstances unquote, and these adjustments included relocating or removing

(02:26:20):
Pride displays due to quote threats impacting our team members
a sense of safety and well being at work. Quote.
Employees were also instructed to specifically remove items quote at
the center of the most significant confrontational behavior unquote like shapewear, binders,
and a tuck friendly swimwear, and to quote replace them
with swimwear to better meet our sales goalsuot now. Walsh

(02:26:44):
claimed that the tuck friendly swimwear was being marketed to kids,
but it only came in adult sizes. A lot of
this sort of harassment campaign isn't really based on anything truthful,
but that doesn't really matter. Here's a quote from Walsh again, quote,
I think this Target boycott has real staying power. Target
has now branded itself as a far left organization to

(02:27:06):
the point where it's embarrassing to shop there. This is
the branding that makes the boycott stick. It happened about Light,
I think it's happening to Target. This is what conservatives
have missed in the past with failed boycott attempts. It's
not enough to simply tell people not to shop somewhere
or buy something. You have to make it so that
they don't want to. So after a around five percent

(02:27:29):
sales drop in the second quarter, and again it's hard
to actually figure out what that can be attributed to.
Beer sales also hit like their lowest level in recent history. Yes,
you're just kind of a Again, it's hard to see
if these things are actually working, But that doesn't matter
because the right can claim them as a success. Yeah. Yeah,

(02:27:49):
and Target released an update saying, quote, the reaction is
a signal for us to pause, adapt and learn so
that our future approach to these moments balances celebration, inclusivity,
and broad based appeal unquote. And Walsh claimed this announcement
as a quote quite massive victory. Now, I hope you know,

(02:28:09):
I hope many of us aren't, you know, shopping for
Pride products at a store like Target. But for a
lot of kids and even adults in more conservative areas
of the country, Target was really the only place to
get gender firming clothing like binders and trans friendly swimsuits
in person. These things can be tricky to buy online.
Sometimes you don't want to package showing up to your
door if you can't be the one to like open it.

(02:28:32):
So Target really was the only place for a lot
of people to have access to this kind of stuff. Now,
last year, Michael Knowles tried to kind of replicate the
Matt Walsh strategy because it proved to be very, very successful.
So they had Walls going out on doing very similar
kind of anti transit speeches. He spoke at a lot

(02:28:52):
of the big conservative conferences talking about how we need
to eliminate transgenderism. He jumped on this this boycott stuff
and his viewers saying, quote, we need to make the
Pride symbol toxic for brands. We need to make companies
think twice as we're making these symbols culturally toxic. We've
got to come in with more political force to ban
this stuff. Don't back down. The progress conservatives have made

(02:29:14):
on this just between twenty twenty one and twenty twenty three,
the fact that companies are trying to back off shows
that we are winning. Keep pushing much much harder. Unquote
and at the very least local governments were responding to
this sort of thing. In another instance of the government
being in cahoots with the Daily Wire, on July fifth,

(02:29:37):
twenty twenty three, the Attorney's General of Indiana, Arkansas, Idaho Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri,
and South Carolina sent a joint letter adjusted to Target's CEO,
ostensibly threatening legal action against Target for carrying LGBTQ merchandise.
I'm going to read some quotes from this letter because
it's a really interesting thing that I've never really seen done.

(02:30:00):
Four in terms of like five or six of these
states all coming together to actually affect the market. Quote.
Target's pride campaign not only raises concerns under our states
child protection and parental rights laws, but also against our
states economic interests. As Target shareholders, Target's management has a

(02:30:20):
finishiary duty to our states as shareholders in the company.
The evidence suggests that Targets directors and officers may be
negligent in undertaking the pride campaign, which negatively affected Target's
stock price. Moreover, it may have improperly directed company resources
for collateral, political, or social goals unrelated to the companies
and its shareholders best's interests. It is likely more profitable

(02:30:44):
to sell the type of pride that enshrines the love
of the United States. Target's pride campaign alienates, whereas pride
in our country unites. Targets management has no duty to
fulfill stores with objectionable goods, let alone endor or feature
them in attention grabbing displays at the behest of radical activists. However,

(02:31:04):
Target's management does have a fdicciary duty to its shareholders
to act in the company's best interests. Target's board and
management may not lawfully dilute their findicciary duties to satisfy
the boards or the left wing activists desire to foist
contentious political or social agendas upon families and children at
the expense of the company's hard won goodwill and against

(02:31:27):
its best interests unquote. And it's just generally not a
great sign when the government is trying to convince a
business that it's in their legal and financial interests to
throw the gaze to the wolves. Now, it's also, yeah,
that's not how fiduciary duty works. Like, no, it's not
a legal principle. It's more of a philosophical principle among

(02:31:50):
capitalists that is dominant. But like, you actually are not
breaking the law by doing something that's not in fiduciary
interest of your shareholders, among other things, basically impossible to
anyway whatever this is all, But it's a question of
like what you can get away with right. This is
what fascists always do, and it's from a strategic standpoint.

(02:32:12):
If you're looking at the culture war as a kind
of mutual insurgency, it's a strategy of denying terrain to
the enemy, in this case, access to a place that
is available in basically every state where trans people can
purchase stuff like binders and get to try them all
like it's making life. It's reducing maneuvering space for the enemy,

(02:32:32):
as they see it. Yeah, and this campaign worked specifically
because of the Christian rights willingness to use physical violence,
property destruction, and threats against workers to achieve their goals.
That is why Target caved, because enough of their employees
were feeling threatened, enough of their displays were being destroyed
and ransacked. No one was held accountable because they're not

(02:32:54):
going to arrest these people for the stuff. And that's
what causes to really have any level of success. Now.
During Pride Month back in twenty twenty three, Starbucks union
members began coming forward saying that Starbucks and store managers
weren't letting employees put up their usual Pride decorations, telling
workers that it was a safety concern, citing recent incidents

(02:33:14):
at Target and the manufactured about light controversy. Now Starbucks
Corporate claimed that they made no policy changes regarding pride decorations,
but that quote, retail leaders continued to work with store
teams to find ways to celebrate their communities, keeping in
mind our safety standards unquote. So I think this was
more up to kind of like local ownership and local management.

(02:33:35):
The union publicized confirmed instances of managers not letting workers
wear pride pins or put up flags, and then in
early June, a regional director ordered a collection of one
hundred stores across Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Missouri to throw out
pride decorations from previous years and were barred from putting
up any pride related decor inside stores. The union claims

(02:33:57):
that there was workers in a total of twenty one
states that were not allowed to put up pride decorations.
And I think for the Daily Wire hosts that are
pushing this sort of stuff, and especially Michael Knowles, especially
Matt Walsh, their motive is deeply theological for this, But
for the Daily Wire, this is deeply economical because all

(02:34:21):
of this also serves as free advertising for the Daily
Wire and it builds the personal brand of their hosts,
which is the very thing that Jeremy Boring was trying
to get started with Ben Shapiro back during Truth Revolt.
This was his whole idea was building up the personal
brand of these of these right wing media figures, and

(02:34:41):
all of this anti queer stuff provides really, really great
marketing to propel these one time very niche figures into
actual national spotlight. Do you know what else deserves to
be put into the spotlight, Robert, Now, that's a crime.
All of my ideas are to suggest crime. Let's just
move on. Let's just let's you know, I think ads

(02:35:03):
deserves huh. There we go the spotlight. Great, all right,
we are back. It's once again time to talk about
the Daily Wire Plus and their and their hit new

(02:35:27):
streaming service. So when Jeremy Boring announced the Daily Wire
Plus back in twenty twenty two, the early marketing was
made in response to the Disney Company having very very
very very slight pushback on Florida's Don't Say Gay Bill. Now,

(02:35:47):
a big part of the Daily Wire Plus announcement was
about how Disney has been woke afying children's TV shows,
and so the Daily Wire decided to position itself as
a safe alternative media hub for conservative families. I'm going
to play a short clip from the announcement. There is
unbelievable kids content in the market. The beauty of kids

(02:36:07):
content is that, unlike adult content, there's always new kids
and they go back and watch it. So there's an
unbelievable library of content. Most of it's at Disney, let's
be honest. But it's not that the content isn't great.
It's that you can't trust the platform. You can't put
your kids in front of a classic piece of Disney
content because you don't know that the very next thing
that plays won't be that not so secret gay agenda

(02:36:30):
that teaches your daughter that she's a boy. That's why
we have to have Daily wire Plus. So that is
what they're framing the Daily wire Plus ass That's why
the Daily wire Plus is important. Also, I love how
he said that kid's content is so profitable because there

(02:36:52):
keeps being kids, unlike adult content, which doesn't make any
sense because kids we stopped a but like a plague hit,
it doesn't make any sense at all. Yeah, that's like
a reverse Children of Men sort of deal. Anyway, God,
what a mess that would be man. That's not a

(02:37:13):
bad idea for a movie. Just people keep making more babies,
but they never grow up. So just like a dwindling
number of adults and infinite babies. That's not bad, not
a bad idea. This is why I like watching Jeremy
Boring because there's so many moments like this, because he's
so not charismatic, but his complete void just makes I

(02:37:39):
just can't stop staring into the void. Yeah, I already
just listening to thirty seconds of him. I've had an
idea for a multimillion dollar adaptation, gritty adaptation of the
rug Rats. I think we could, really we can make
a lot of money with this. So a press release
put out by The Daily Wire itself went into more
detail about the company's child content initiative. Now I'm gonna

(02:38:03):
read this, this is a direct quote quote. On Wednesday evening,
the Daily Wire's co CEO and god King, Jeremy Boring,
announced that the Daily Wire company town Hall that the
company will invest a minimum of one hundred million dollars
over the next three years into a line of live
action and animated children's entertainment on its streaming platform unquote,

(02:38:27):
and that that term God King is constantly how Jeremy
refers to himself, which I guess is supposed to be
a joke, but the fact that he does it at
all is is is the actual joke that the fact
that he just calls himself the God King is what
a what a perfect look into the soul of just

(02:38:48):
a completely dead man. Yeah, he the God King of
the Daily Wire. That's that's been like rewritten in like
deadline variety. Actual publications have been forced to write the
God King Jeremy boring anyway. So to start this child

(02:39:09):
content initiative, Jeremy brought some writers from Netflix's Veggietails and
The Babylon Bee to head up their kid's content. I
have a picture in my script here that Robert can
see of Eric Brand's gum, which is a great name. Yeah,
that is an amazing name. Who is the co creator
of the first Daily Wire kids show, Chip Chilla and Robert.

(02:39:31):
Do you want to describe what's in this picture of Eric? Yeah, Well,
there is a heavy set man wearing a T shirt
that is, to be frank a little tighter than is comfortable.
He's got a red beard, he has sunglasses on. It
looks like right, up above his hairline. A massive Confederate
flag lines the wall behind him, and he appears to

(02:39:53):
be casually pointing a handgun at his penis at his dick. Yes, yes,
can't tell if it's fingers through the trigger guard, but
I hope so. Yeah. So that is the co creator
of Chipchilla, which we will we will get to in
a sec Now, I don't know this. Also, there are
four to six moist spots on his shirt and it

(02:40:17):
does not It doesn't. It's not a flattering look. I'm
not body shaming the man. I'm just saying there are
four to six moist spots on his shirt, and I
wouldn't want to be filmed with with that many moist
spots on my shirt while pointing a gun at my
dick in front of a Confederate flag. Now. I don't
know if this is either despite or because of The

(02:40:39):
Daily Wire's constant attacks on how Disney has a gay agenda,
But The Daily Wire did manage to acquire some talent
from Disney. In August of twenty twenty two, they recruited
the showrunner of the Emmy winning animated series Rapunzel's Tangled Adventure,
Chris Sonnenberg to be the Senior VP of Animation Development
and Production at The Daily Wire. Now they most likely

(02:41:01):
got this guy the Jeremy Borings and Sonnenberg's mutual friend
Zachary Levi, who again was in was in Boring's first movie,
and Zachary Levi also starred as Flinn Ryder Entangled and
This and This Tangled animated series for the Disney Channel.
So I'm guessing this is how this connection was made.
But yeah, so this this guy who was actually like

(02:41:23):
a very successful, like mainstream showrunner for animated animated shows,
some somehow decided to agree to get hired by The
Daily Wire. And this is this is now his jobs
overseeing the animated production for chip Chilla, Yeah, which is
the Bluey knock off. I mean, yes, I get it,
among other things. There's been a lot of layoffs and animation.

(02:41:44):
I have no doubt that a number of people who
don't align ideologically but are desperate for a job and
just more morally flexible than others are going to wind
up working for this project. Yeah. Yeah, So this past October,
the Daily Wire's multi year initiative to create a slate

(02:42:05):
of children's programming finally had something to show. In another
live streamed announcement, Jeremy Boring ranted about how Disney is
using their parent trusted brand to quote indoctrinate children into
the LGBTQIA cult unquote. Now, while he praised Walt Disney
as an American entrepreneur, Jeremy Boring derided the current state

(02:42:29):
of the Disney Company as quote pushing all of the
worst excesses of the woke left, including paying for employees abortions,
promoting anti racism training end quote, going to war on
behalf of the left wing social policy in Florida. Unquote.
Boring framed Disney's quite tame political stances as a huge

(02:42:51):
cultural loss for conservatives. And here's a part of that announcement.
It would be impossible to overstate just how big a
loss this is for Americans. Wuper even basic reality, Disney
controls the greatest content library ever created. Their cultural reach,
particularly with children, is beyond anything that's ever existed. Recognizing
the scope of this loss, the Daily Wire announced that

(02:43:12):
we would spend one hundred million dollars over three years
to begin our own kids entertainment company, and today, on
the one hundredth anniversary of the day Walt Disney founded
his company. I'm proud to announce the launch of ours,
introducing bent Key and Entirely New Companies for The Daily Wire,
a company dedicated to creating the next generation of timeless
stories to transport kids into a world of adventure, imagination,

(02:43:35):
and joy. Okay, okay, so bent bent Key, Robert, how
do you feel about one? The name, the name bent Key,
and the and the the bent Key logo. The bent
Key logo looks like a flaccid penis. He does kind

(02:43:56):
of look like a flacid penis. Y. I don't know.
It's not an appealing name. You know. One thing you've
got to say for Walt Disney, and I guess it's
impossible to say. Like my head says, there's something just
kind of inherently attractive about the last name Disney. Yeah,
but like made it always a good brand. But maybe if, like,

(02:44:17):
if he'd been named Bluffo, would it have worked? Would
Bluffo Entertainment be the cultural powerhouse that it became. I
can't even we can't answer Disney's such a thing. You
can't answer it even. Yeah, they could have gone with
a boring entertainment. But I guess they Yeah, that was
not gonna happen. Bluffo's a better one than boring. But yeah,

(02:44:38):
bent keys. That's the word bent and the word key,
and yeah, the logo is this lowercase B with a
little droopy arm connecting to the letter K. Yeah, which
doesn't really look like a key, but does look a
little bit like an abstracted penis. You've got the B
part kind of forming the head. You've got the ties

(02:44:58):
of the key are two ball. I would have given
it three times if I was making the key, just
so it didn't look like balls. Ah. Well, do you
know what else is a really important announcement that we
have for our audience now, it's these products and services

(02:45:18):
that support this podcast to pay close attention. This is
crucial information about the fight for America and to secure
our values. Okay, all right, we are back back to

(02:45:41):
talk about bent Key Entertainment, the new hit streaming service
that your kids can enjoy. So the Daily Wire Kids
content used to be under the banner of just Daily
Wire Kids or DW Kids, right, and the choice to rebrand,
even with a name as silly as bent Key, I

(02:46:02):
think is actually one of their smarter moves here. They
recognize that The Daily Wire is a very politically charged
and possibly limiting title if they want to create a
growing children's media company. Now Ever, since what is a
Woman and up to their most recent releases like Ladyballers,
the name the Daily Wire has actually been hidden or

(02:46:24):
not included in like legal contracts and forms when people
are signing up to these projects. So I think bent
Key allows them to cast the widest net possible to
not only you get people to buy their service, but
also to get people to collaborate with them on media.
And it also like it also works to attract parents
that might not even be aware of what the Daily

(02:46:44):
Wire is. It's just this new kids streaming service company.
And also bent Key Ventures also happens to be the
name of The Daily Wire's parent company, so that's probably
why they picked it. I still don't know what bent
Key means, but it's also the name of the parent
company for The Daily Wire, which is probably the name

(02:47:05):
they're gonna use for a lot of like their contracts.
And they're trying to like get like actors and like
producers to sign into their stuff, because whenever someone sees
the Daily Wire on something, if they're smart at all
they'll be like, absolutely not. But if the word bent
key is on there instead, maybe that won't raise as
many red flags. So the new child focused app is

(02:47:28):
available for only ninety nine dollars a year. Hell hell
of a steal. Wow And at launch included one hundred
and fifty episodes across eighteen different shows, four of which
were produced in house, with new episodes airing every Saturday morning.
Their flagship show, Chipchilla is about a family of homeschooled chinchillas. Now,

(02:47:53):
some have pointed out that this appears to be a
blatant conservative ripoff of the very popular kid show Bluey. Yes,
and I have I have a picture comparing Blue and
Chip Chilla. Here the same fucking animation style, Yeah except except.
I think this also shows that if you've seen any

(02:48:14):
of the Blue art, you can compare it to the
Chip Chilla art. They do look similar in like color palette,
but there is a massive difference in like the appealing
design of Blue, which actually looks pretty good versus the
the design of the Chip Chilla characters just looks slightly
off it. It looks kind of like they're all on
like half a tab of acid versus Yeah, versus Bluey

(02:48:39):
looks like has like pretty good character design like it
has it has a lot of it has a lot
of range for like expressions versus everyone in chip Chilla
just all has the same like a wide eyed look.
Pretty widely considered to be like one of the better
children's animated shows. That's that's just existed. Yeah, so somehow,

(02:49:01):
somehow the Blue Dog Show must have been too woke.
So instead in the Daily Wires version, the kids are
all homeschooled and operate as like a stereotypical nuclear family.
Mm hmm, so this was This was the first show
they announced, but they have others. Their other original content
includes a show where a middle aged woman talks to

(02:49:24):
a dog puppet god So yeah, lamb Chop okay, and
two other original live action shows star child actors that
teach fitness and history to kids. And all of between
all of the Daily Wire original content I've watched. The
thing I feel most uncomfortable about is the amount of
child actors who've been forced into doing this, who don't

(02:49:45):
know anything about The Daily Wire or politics. They're just
these poor kids who have now been forced to participate
in this like evil machine. Now I'm going to play
a one minute, one minute trailer for Robert. I'm not
going to play it for the audience here because you
don't need to just hear this add but you will
hear our reactions afterwards. So here's for Robert. Here is
the trailer for bent Key. Oh God, how'd you feel

(02:50:10):
about the bent Key trailer? Robert? Yeah, I don't know.
I mean, we'll see if it takes off. I'm sure
it could be a profitable business, right yeah, yeah, yeah,
in terms of capturing the wider cultural market, I don't
see it being a Disney level success or even like
a Nickelodeon level success. I'm looking at it right now
on Twitter. It's got four hundred and ninety likes and

(02:50:34):
six hundred something thousand views. So again, I can see
them getting enough downloads to make this maybe worthwhile enough.
If they're spending thirty million or more a year on production,
that is going to be kind of hard, especially given
like bandwidth costs and shit to I don't know, we'll say, yeah,
I'm surprised if it's able to be a functional business.

(02:50:55):
I don't think. I don't see anything on there that
makes me think, oh this is kids are going to
fall in love with this shit. Most of these, most
great like children's networks and children's like entertainment companies, were
driven by iconic successes that like absolutely took over and
were like dominant culturally. You think about like in the

(02:51:17):
early nineties, shit like Aladdin, right, and like or The
Lion King, how fucking everywhere and how a generation before
you had, you know, the earlier generation of Disney animated movies.
You think about stuff like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
or like the Uh. That kind of stuff was was

(02:51:38):
not just it was dominant among kids, but it also
like adults continue to watch it for generations. And I've
never run into anybody outside of weird right wings, outside
of not even weird right wing circles. I've never run
out into anybody who has not work for The Daily
Wire talking about these shows. Yes, and I think there's
a few things about that. I think One, they don't

(02:51:58):
need kids to like it. They only need parents to
pay the annual fee, yeah, for it to make sense
as a business, for it to do culturally what they
want rather more as required. At least a few years ago,
they were pulling in over one hundred million dollars in
revenue per year. And one thing that Daily Wire has
shown is that they are kind of playing the long

(02:52:19):
game with this sort of stuff. They're not looking for
short term profit. They're looking to slowly build dominance in
this industry, mostly to just fulfill Jeremy and Ben's dreams
of working in Hollywood. Like that's all this is, is
that they're trying to fill their childhood dreams of making movies.
So all of this is just being put towards making
industry connections to be able to actually just make TV

(02:52:41):
and films like that. That's all this is actually for.
So which leads us to the most ambitious upcoming bent
Key production, a live action fairy tale adaption written by
Jeremy Boring in response to Disney's own upcoming remake of
their class film snow White. The company Disney found it

(02:53:04):
doesn't agree with their founder and visionary they're remaking their
own iconic film nearly one hundred years later. They've decided
to make some key changes. Their lead actress the new
snow White, Rachel Ziegler, has summed it up saying, quote,
I just mean it's no longer nineteen thirty seven. We
absolutely wrote a snow White that she's not going to
be saved by the prince, and she's not going to

(02:53:25):
be dreaming about true love. She's dreaming about becoming the
leader she knows she can be, and the leader that
her late father told her she could be if she
was fearless, fair, brave and true. While Disney still uses
Walt's name, they've all but abandoned his legacy. Instead of
telling stories about timeless truth what the ancient fairy tales
were all about, Disney's new snow White is an apology

(02:53:45):
for their past and will expose children to the popular
but destructive lies of the current moment. Which is why,
in addition to announcing the launch of our Kids Entertainment Company,
I also want to announce today that company's first live
action feature film, story about a princess and a prince,
about beauty and vanity, about love and its power to
raise us from death to life. It's our own peration

(02:54:09):
of an ancient fairy tale. It's coming in twenty twenty four,
and it's called So. Before I play the rest of
the trailer for Robert, there is a few funny things
about this clip that I just played for the audience
as well. Mostly when he's describing like the new Disney
snow White, it's like a very like sensible message that
the lead actor was talking about. He's like, this is horrible, imassion,

(02:54:32):
I also don't even think it's a great message. Like
it's a very conservative message that like this woman is
born to lead and it is about her finding her
place in the bread, in the hierarchy of her state.
Like that's a pretty conservative message. They just hate it
because a Walm set it. Yes, but now will I
will play you the very brief, like thirty second trailer

(02:54:54):
based on like this one thing they've shot one super
Jesus Christ so bad, a tale of typeless truth. Prince
would come wow, little on the nose. Oh my god,

(02:55:18):
she's even got a basket of red apples, the kind
of apples that don't exist anywhere but a gene engineered farm.
Oh my god. Oh and it's clearly snow white. Oh
my god. Yes, ah fuck. So I actually I actually

(02:55:41):
do want to play that for the audience because it's
just so nunny. You keep that in there. That's that's
good because like the song they've got in there is
like completely without wonder. It's just like once upon a
time a principal come or some shit. She's like in
the woods picking apples that are like a color of
red that you don't even see in the like that
not a natural read at all, just profoundly off putting,

(02:56:04):
in weird. So one hundred and seventy seventeen thousand views,
So I don't know, we'll see if this beats the
original snow White or whatever snow White real actors and
writers are making. So this is This is snow White
and the Evil Queen, And I'm not sure if you
pick this up. This is this is starring failed actor

(02:56:26):
and the Daily Wire's own gen Z female clone of
Ben Shapiro, Brett Cooper as snow White. It's that other
Daily Wire host that looks like a weird female version
of Ben Shapiro is starring as Snowing and it all
just looks like really bad cosplay, like the it is.

(02:56:49):
It was quite something. So that is that is their
first bent Key upcoming original movie. So I'm sure everyone's
gonna be excited for that one. And like it seems
the entire bent Key strategy is to either be so
banal that it appeals to like unassuming parents who don't
know what The Daily Wire is, or to create these

(02:57:11):
like fake culture war outrage moments to scare parents into
thinking that woke corporations are trying to turn their kids
gay or or trying to tear kids into like feminists,
and the only way to stop that is to give
The Daily Wire one hundred dollars a year to watch
failed screenwriters and actors poorly imitate better pieces of film
and TV. I think the trouble they're going to have

(02:57:35):
here is that there's a I think a discrepancy between
what would do the best job of achieving what they
claim as their social mission right, which is incepting conservative
ideas into mass culture by taking over pop entertainment, and
they're what is clearly their more important goal, which is

(02:57:56):
making a lot of money. Because the best way to
make a lot of money, and I think they there's
a good chance they can succeed building a content network
for their weirdo fans that cost one hundred dollars a year,
But if they want to reach the most people, the
best thing they do would be to get to a
point where they can sell their videos streaming to Netflix
and the like. But that doesn't keep people in their

(02:58:18):
walled garden and also probably is less profitable over time
than having a monopoly on this shit. And so I
don't know what they're going to choose to do. That'll
be interesting to watch, but yeah, I mean it's the
kind of thing is a business. This could work for sure.
We'll see about the other stuff. And again, so this
is this is only half of their efforts, because on

(02:58:40):
top of the one hundred million dollars put towards children's
program thing which has resulted in bent Key, the Daily
Wire Plus was also putting an additional one hundred million
dollars into more adult oriented entertainment. Now, most of the
Daily Wires production effort has been going into adapting the
Christian Arthurian novels The Pendragon Cycle live action seven episode

(02:59:02):
mini series directed by Jeremy Boring. The upcoming fantasy series
just wrapped filming in Europe this past fall. The cast
is mostly made up of like sealist actors. Never never,
I don't know where they made the scarson, but never
has a production seemed more Croatia than this. It's stilled
in Hungary, in Italy. So oh my god, I was close.

(02:59:23):
I was close. There you go there you go. Ah, Okay.
The cast is made up of mostly Like sealst actors,
some Daily Wire staff, and actors from small roles in
like Game of Thrones and The Witcher. So this is
coming out later this year. It's based on this series
of novels that came out in the in the two thousands.
It's it's it's like an Arthurian story, but set slightly

(02:59:45):
before the rise of like England. It's it's during like
the fall of like British Rome. I think is what
they call it now. Guys, I'm sorry. We all got
to see a great Arthurian cycle move recently, and something
tells me this one's gonna have a lot less of
a guy coming into a scarf. You don't think you'll

(03:00:07):
think this'll be as good as The Green Knight. I
don't think we're gonna get a real fucking clear shot
of one guy's come in a scarf. I'll tell you that.
I trust director Jeremy Boring's vision, ah man. But the
project I am the most excited about is that The
Daily Wire has acquired exclusive rights to adapt in Rand's

(03:00:32):
Atlas Shrugged into a television series. Oh good, Oh my god.
That's like that's like being an opponent of the Nazis
in nineteen forty one and hearing that they've just invaded
the Soviet Union, Like, oh thank god, Okay, okay, we're
on the down swing of this one. Boys. I am

(03:00:53):
I am so excited to see the libertarian wet dream
that's gonna be this Atlas Shrugged TV show. There is
no one else I would rather adapt to Atlas Shrugged
than the Daily Wire parpacouse. Antlas Shrug is like famously
like the least filmable thing of all time, like it's
it's the scout Heads actually could be like a fine movie,

(03:01:16):
but Atlas, I don't. I'm I'm excited to think you
can make Atlas Shrugged and do I hope I hope
they do shot for shot that one like seventy page
speech that what's his name goes on? Oh yeah, that's
that's what I really want. Ah. So yeah, I am
actually excited to excited to not like hate watch, but

(03:01:37):
like curiously staring into the void watch their Atlas, their
Atlas Shrug show. But the one Daily Wire plus series
that I am not very much excited about is an
upcoming adult animated a scripted series created by Adam krolla
entitled Mister Burchum God in Heaven. Yeah, I saw ads

(03:01:58):
for this one. Yeah, this show's description sounds like the
most old man yells at cloud premise I've ever heard. Quote.
Mister Burcham attempts to navigate a world he doesn't understand
or approve of. He's befuddled by his gaming streamer's son Eddie,
annoyed at his selfie taking snowflake students, and is constantly

(03:02:18):
at war with the school district's appointed Jedi Justice Equality,
Diversity and Inclusion officer, mister CARPONSEI UNQ. So that's the
description of the show, which I don't know about you.
That sounds like a horrible time. The cast includes Corolla
as mister Burcham, Magan Kelly Roseenne Barr, conservative comedian Tyler Fisher,

(03:02:42):
Daily Wire hosts Brett Cooper and Cana Owens, comedian Alonso Broden,
a former Amy Schumer, writer Kyle Dunningen, and unfortunately Danny
Trejoe and Patrick Warburton. That last one hurts, that last one,
I know. That's I know all sad. Let's I am

(03:03:07):
going to play this for the audience because, oh my
I guess I'm not surprised that being in Venture Brothers
didn't pay enough for him to avoid this. Yeah, and
apparently Warburton is a conservative. I am interested to see
what some of these people were told before they agreed
to this, because I know the Daily Player's name has
been hidden in a lot of contracts. Well, and Adam

(03:03:29):
Carol is a real comedian, Like I didn't say good,
but like he is somebody who established a career in Hollywood. Yeah,
I get it. So and it looks like fucking Brickleberry
and all those other like dog shit, cheap shit cartoons. Yeah,
it looks bad. Let's let's let's have fun listening to
this though. Jumping in the first one speed Action Sawbucks

(03:03:55):
looking a little chubby woman, amazing voice acting by making
Kelly dogs are supposed to eat meat. They're just sentence
of wolves. You ever see a vegan wolf on the
Nature Channel. I'm a vegan, very very funny. US closers, ladies,
listen up, Oh my god, don't do anything stupid ear

(03:04:16):
than last year. I'm a heteronormative cisgender white male, for
which I apologize. I'm black and that used to be enough,
but I'm also bilingual and a'm non binary. Where the
Army we drink more before nine am, the Navy pukes
do all day. He rubbed all the fur off his
emotional support far the damn thing looked like a four

(03:04:37):
legged Rosanne bar. Oh God, charity and work two words
that should never go together, like women and opinions. They're
salting and make me dizzy. Or it just did find
a thing to fix my gaming chair. When I was
on the construction site, my chair was a five gallon bucket.

(03:05:00):
It was also my toilet. See, it's what's amazing about
that all of the Megan Kelly and can like terrible
voices character to them. Adam Carolla sounds like a parody
of himself. He's going too hard into gruff. It just
it's maybe maybe if I see the show, it'll be
better because it may just have picked some lines where

(03:05:21):
he was doing that, but there's not much character to
his voice. What I will say is I hate that
he's in this. But Patrick Burton still a pro every man.
That man can do a line. Read, That man knows
how to do a fucking line read. No, It's weird
how many of these are like actual comedians who have
been who are being forced to read like non binary

(03:05:44):
and they're like, they don't know what non binary means.
They're just being forced to read a script written by
Ben Shapiro and they're like, one of these words, it
doesn't matter, just keep going. Yeah, get your paycheck. I
don't know, it's it's it's a bummer. Yeah. I It's
weird because, like Adam Carolla, I've never felt anything positive

(03:06:07):
towards or particularly negative towards until recently. I guess now
I'm on the negative side. Even with this, I still
feel overall good about Patrick Warburt, and he's just given
me too much. Yeah, it'll take a lot. So this this,
that is most of what I wanted to talk about,
because the only other Daily Wire project I have anything

(03:06:28):
to say about is the movie that came out a
few months ago, Lady Ballers, and I I could not,
I could not fit my Lady Baller's thoughts into this
episode because that is that is gonna be its own,
its own special event. That's that's gonna be your Fittigan's wake. Yes,
So a few weeks ago I watched it for the

(03:06:49):
first time. I took a lot of notes. I'm gonna
watch it again here, and we are gonna go deep
into the production of this movie. This thing was shot.
This this just just a peak of of of of
of the writing quality you're you're about to hear about.
The whole strip is written in two weeks. It was.
It was shot in like a month. It's it's it
stars the only Daily Wire hosts. Every single actor they

(03:07:14):
approached for this turned it down because they're like, absolutely not, no,
fuck this shit. And it is a It is a
a insightful, insightful look into the soul of Jeremy Boring.
He wrote, directed, produced, and starred in this thing. It
was shot right in Nashville, Tennessee. So that is gonna

(03:07:34):
be after the weekend, this is We're gonna have a
special episode of me diving into what makes Lady Baller's
tick and is it any funny? The answer is not really,
But we will we will go into the production of
this movie, the way this movie tries to work, and
what we can learn about how the Daily Wire is
going to try to be producing these sorts of comedy

(03:07:55):
films and try to insert itself into into the entertainment industry.
So that will be that that will be the start
of next week are special on Lady Ballers, any any
any closing thoughts on on on bent Key or or
the Daily Wire plus as as as as the Daily
Wire enters the streaming market. Robert Patrick, you don't have

(03:08:15):
to do this, like, just just let us know you
need help. We can take care of you, you know, Patrick,
We we love you. If you need help with the mortgage,
we can, we can crowd fund. Yeah, we can make
this work, buddy, We can make this work anyway. Well,

(03:08:36):
that does it for us today. I hope you're reding
something about Jeremy Boring the most forgettable man with the
most accurate name. Yep, all right, guys. Bye, Hey, We'll
be back Monday with more episodes every week from now
until the heat death of the Universe. It could Happen

(03:08:57):
here as a production of pool Zone Media. One more
podcasts from cool Zone Media. Visit our website Coolzonemedia dot com,
or check us out on the iHeartRadio app, Apple Podcasts,
or wherever you listen to podcasts. You can find sources
for It Could Happen Here, updated monthly at Coolzonmedia dot
com slash sources. Thanks for listening.

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