All Episodes

December 31, 2019 31 mins

For the graffiti artist known as Worldwide Crudo, painting without permission in dozens of countries around the world — on a whim — fuels his inventiveness, builds his network, and feeds his need for adrenaline. 


 Find more info about this episode at Fathomaway.com

Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mark as Played
Transcript

Episode Transcript

Available transcripts are automatically generated. Complete accuracy is not guaranteed.
Speaker 1 (00:05):
Fety will open up any type of paths you want.
It will take you all over the world. When I
told people in the corporate world that I am going
to travel the world and paint for a living, people
look at me like I have four eyes and you
are crazy. Welcome to a Way to Go a production
of I Heart Radio and Fathom. I'm Geralin Gerba and

(00:25):
I'm Pavio Rosatti. When you operate as a graffiti artist,
it's all about proliferation. You get out there and tag
as much as you can, as often as you can.
The work is ephemeral, so you have to keep it moving.
For the street artist, known as worldwide Crudo, painting without
permission in Vietnam, France, Switzerland, Chili and Peru, among other places,
fuels his inventiveness, fixes his adrenaline, and builds his network

(00:48):
tags and throws also called for spontaneity, a hallmark of
his travel style. When it comes to traveling, for Crudo,
taking risks leads to great rewards. He's in the studio
with us today to talk about this some more. Thank
you for joining us. Crude out what's going on? Crude? Oh,
paint a little picture for us of what your work

(01:08):
looks like, first and foremost very colorful. I'd like to
keep a South American style, spontaneous crude. Oh means raw
in Spanish. So I just like to just throw it
out there. I don't like fine lines. I don't like
perfection because I do that when I'm in the office
doing graphic design, when I'm doing all the corporate stuff

(01:31):
or logos and websites. But when it comes to art,
I just I just want to get drunk and release.
Is it that sounds really fun? Is it representative? Would
I be able to say, Oh that's a building, Oh
that's a ghost, Oh that's a flower, or is it
more abstract shapes? I definitely do something called it to Me,
which is a ceremonial knife, and that's part of my ancestors,

(01:55):
the Incas. So instead of traditionally a lot of Grafferiti
artists use a name. Obviously my name is c r
U d O Guodo, So I took a character from
the Incas and it's called it to me to you
M t U M I, and that's what I used
as my bomb as. My character basically represent my ancestors
in every bomb I do. So I did it in

(02:17):
a way that's contemporary with a bombing bubble their style,
but also representing my past without getting to ethnic, rather
about it just keeping it fun, funky and not forgetting
the past whilst representing the element of hip hop that
I do with that. I want to see what that
looks like, and I think that our listeners due too,
So when we put page up about this in addition

(02:39):
to the show notes, we are going to definitely link
to some photos of what that, to me looks like.
And do you think the luggage company named their luggage
company after the tow me? That's a wonderful question, because, oh,
that company. Every time I look up to me, instead
of the right thing coming up, the Luggae Company comes
up to their sco is obviously a lot better than
whoever is represencing are. How long did it take you

(03:00):
to produce a work of art on the fly? Yeah,
you said it's spontaneous, so okay, illegal graffiti. You only
have so much time, and it depends. It's all mental.
Sometimes you could literally get away with doing five to
ten minutes, but in your mind you're like, I only
have a minute. It depends because it depends your state
of mind. If you're nervous if you're just in a rush,

(03:23):
you don't know what cars coming you let car spices
by is out of copies that or not. So I
usually don't take more than a minute because I know
I can finish your mine in a minute. I used
to take about two minutes, but I got so good
at it I could be onder a minute now. And
how big is a piece? I want to stay something
by three by three to you know, no, no like
more like I try to go at least four to
five ft. It's about four by five And so you

(03:47):
have to use the paint. Just make sure it's a cans,
a high pressure can with a big nozzle to just
go quick because and they're bubble letters, so you're filling
them in along the way exactly solely colorful, full drenched
for sure. Like if we're on the streets and we
have no time, it's just I gotta be as quick
as possible. But if I have time, like in the
train tracks, then you have we'll put more color, more

(04:08):
flavor into it and definitely appeal to more people. How
many cans are you taking with you? Like do you
have a lot of gear that you're taking with you?
So when I was younger, rather not younger. When I
was younger and when I started bombing, in that sense,
I would have bring too many cans, and I would
being the wrong colors and this and that, and people

(04:28):
like you are fucking sloppy right now, bring only the
cans you're gonna use and have a color scheme because
I love to go bombing. Bombing is another term for
going out painting. So from there, like I would always
mess up, So there was like, just bring what you're
going to use and bring the right colors, because I
would just be scrambling that walking around rattling the cans.

(04:49):
And you're making yourself hot boy, which means that you're
making it. You're bringing too much attention to yourself. You shouldn't.
So I want to on a good night, I would say,
like four cans and make sure that the person has
four hands and you can interchange, interchange of share. That's
what it's all about, all right. So that means that
you're tagging in teams? Are you? Are you often doing
it solo? I never do solo. You can't do it,

(05:10):
so you need to look out. Um, I'm too I
got too many past traumas to just be doing it
by myself. I gotta you know, I think everything is
this and that, so I definitely go with people who
are trusted, more experienced. What about some of the destinations
around the world. Can you tell us a little bit
about how and where you've tagged? So I obviously came
back from a six month hiatus. I was working at

(05:33):
a global advertising agencies that has offices all over the world,
and I put myself on the deadline. I'm like, you
know what, this is too much the corporate world is
too much the office. It's like you're killing my creative juices.
I just wanted to go home and go to sleep
and wake up and do it again. I was. I
wasn't in a good place. So I told myself, you
know what, I'm gonna save up. I'm gonna give this

(05:53):
place two years. And as soon as that date hits,
which was exactly one year last year, I it and
I went on a six month hiatus and I did
so much graffiti that the interposed should be looking for
me right now. Put it that way. Where did you go?
I started off in Thailand, and I went to Myanmar, Vietnam,

(06:18):
South Korea, and then from there I went to Peru,
which that was that's where I really like the most
atrocious types of art crimes you could think about. Put
it that way for he morety got nothing on me,
That's all I gotta say. And that's the old president
that ran away while in the mid of presidency. So
I said that. That says a lot. When you are
traveling around to these places, are you connecting with people

(06:42):
who can be your bombing partners beforehand? It is there
like an underground network connected to That's a very good
question because a lot of old times like oh, you know, Instagram,
social media killed graffiti, blah blah, like look, sit down,
old man, old woman, look check this out. This is
how it goes. Now the game is online. Now'll get over,
you know, get down or laid down. If I didn't
have an Instagram, I would not have as many connections

(07:04):
around the world that I could be able to paint
with people. So album, I'm looked to the game too.
I've been on Instagram a year and a half because
I don't know something to him that you have to
make it. You need an online presence because the world
is not How could the world see something you do
in one neighborhood. You do. You go out one night
and you could do twenty spots and only people that

(07:26):
are there see it. And whoever sees it doesn't even
care because they're not part of the art form. Why
would I care what you do? Number two, it's going
to get you raised. And that's it. You did all
that in Vain. You put all that, you put, all
that investment, all that risk of getting locked up that night,
of getting charges fines in vain. So what do you do?
You shared online it lists forever? Do you put your hashtag,

(07:50):
your your handle underneath your tak Definitely a w W
c R. You deal always? So are you usually going
back the following day taking pictures of the work that
you did the night before? And then I like to
record live videos on the spot, which is another reason
why you want to have a partner with you. And
does this mean you're working during the day? No, and
I always at night, so their nighttime videos because everyone

(08:10):
gets how to work late and the other. But don't
you want to go back the following day to see
it and all? That's that's the best part of it.
You totally get to return to this thing. You want
to walk around and you want to be like, yeah,
that's me. Say you say out loud, that's really good.
Who did that? Who is this guy? Crew? Exactly? That's

(08:30):
why I do a face because when people do letters
is too abstract. Sometimes they do it too too funky,
and people can't read it. I want the everyday common
person to see a face and everyone can relates to
the face because we all see your face in the
mirror every single day. So there's something about the psychologically
psyche of a human that when they see a face,
it's naturally like, okay, you look at it, because it's
like looking at another human being. That's why I do

(08:52):
a face. Everything I do is for a reason. Because
I come from marketing advertising background. I could do my
letters over and over in again, P're getting be like, ah,
that's just letters. Oh I could read it. I may
not read it. They're just gonna be like people have
a one second touch man. Especially in the Greater New
York area where we live at, we're bombarded by by
advertisings and everything. You can't even look at a YouTube
video without getting hit like my song is one minute

(09:14):
and I had four minutes of advertising. So I make
sure to do something that's gonna boom. You're gonna remember
that like a stamp, like when you can see mine
for one second, Like Crude Crudo's back in USA, you know,
Like so when Crude was in Vietnam, when you were
in Thailand, was the work taking on a local flavor
or was it the same style everywhere all over the world.

(09:37):
It's very funny you use that because I do approve
in style, in style, but when I go to places,
I happen to see other faces that remind me so
much of mine, and I try to mimic, like certain features.
This is very a hard meeting to work with, so
I can't it's not find out what had the time
to have the details. Especially I'm doing the league graffiti
on a fly. But I've been places where I take

(10:00):
references when when I wasn't tied on my that's my
face right there, that's that's CRUDEO so style of crude, Yeah, exactly.
So I take that and I will try to do
it at the moment. So if you tag in Rome,
you're gonna put big Roman noses on people, of course,
and with the Roman numerals day and everything. No, Julius
Caesar had peace like I'll replace the tomb we had
to place with the Roman had peace. That was the course.

(10:23):
You know what I'm saying. I'm trying to make it
that's worldwide, not just you know, the origins are here,
but I want to make it for everybody because then
everyone's involved and everyone likes it even more. There is
an advertising overtone to this because you're making the brand
really identifiable. So your professional training so to store absolutely right,

(10:45):
But no, no, definitely, my marketing advertising background is just
like it has a because honestly, graffiti is nothing more
than guerrilla marketing. That's just what it is. Did it
feel special to be bombing in Peru? It was, I'm

(11:07):
telling you right now, I don't know how to explain it.
It was. It was destiny because the tune he comes
from Peru, and you know my parents, my my mom
comes from Peru. Everything tight End. It's like, this is
what you were supposed to do it, this is what
you were supposed to be And as soon as I
got to prove, I got so much love, only because
the Instagram. I'm not gonna lie like, I just got

(11:29):
to prove, and I made sure to do like one
or two on my own. I posted it, and I'm like,
looking for people improve the bomb. I'm from New York.
You gotta sell yourself like that I'm from New York
and that you got You can't be scared. You can't
be scared of risk, or you're gonna get robbed. I
thought that. I'm like, I'm not worried about that. I
got family, I prof I know how Brugos, I know
how their where countries are. So graffiti is a tight

(11:49):
new community, you know. I met one person he invited
me to an event and there happened to be a
hip hop event that week where it was breakdancing and
seeing and graffiti, and they said it would be an
honor for you to go there, not even looking at
my level of skill, just showing love because I was
from New York. And I said, yo, I'm proving from there.
I got there and it was spiraling from there. I
got there was even a romance with a certain artists.

(12:12):
I was a female graffiti writer. It was like it
just turned into a bomb into three four in the
morning and romance until five six seven. Who knows. It
was a great time. Tony. Graffiti will open up any
type of paths you want, it will take you all
over the world. When I told people in the corporate
world that I am gonna travel the world and paint
for a living, people looked at me like I have

(12:34):
four eyes, Like you are crazy. So the living part,
I mean, this sounds like a great way to to
do your thing. Just travel around, have romances like drinks.
But is there is there a path for making a
living doing what you're doing or do you always have
to have the advertising, marketing corporate thing on the side. Both.

(12:57):
But you can't be scared, particularly with faith, you can't
be scared to lose everything. I like the idea of
taking a sojourn, you know, working quitting, taking a sojourn,
then going back to work. That sounds like a good
I worried to do it. I quit and I'm not
going back because there's more money to be made outside
from the corporation, just more money outside to be made

(13:18):
than the corporations. That's why I can't go back that
seeing the truth outside. How does a person that came
from two people that jumped the border from South America
in the eighties, they left the political craziness I was
going out there, you know, they left a Columbian drug
trade during the eighties. My mom left terrorism in the
eighties from Peru, Colombia, all this madness, How did you

(13:40):
jump the border? And how did me get here? And
I'm traveling all over the world, have a stable living
countries and I'm not gonna stop till get to a hundred.
And I'm painting all other seventy countries while I'm there.
Know that illegally and well, but with interest saying about

(14:00):
the fact that it's illegal, it's also becoming incredibly recognized, right,
like people are really excited to spot a bank see
and if a building has a bank see. It's becoming
There's a whole way in which street art in the
last ten years has become a force in tourism. Right
there's the Windward Walls in Florida. There's Valparaiso in Chile,

(14:20):
which is a whole neighborhood in Melbourne streets that you
need to go to to see the graffiti. So what
do you think of this kind of graffiti street art tourism?
Now you say that you just sparked up some some
excitement in me because and Chile, what you just mentioned,
I happened to go there a couple of years ago.
It's great, right, It's like legal graffiti. It's like one

(14:41):
of the cities that has the most graffiti everywhere, illegal
and illegal. But people are the residents that you do
whatever you want. I went there into the four seen
a really good friend of mine from Chile that was
living in New York for a good fifty and twenty years.
He got deported because he got in some trouble and
he went over there. Pep thing was perfect lee and
he's doing graffiti tourists and wine tourists and he's killing

(15:04):
it in Santiago, and so I want to go visit him.
And I'm like, this is insane. And going back to
what you said, Pavia, like Art Basil in wine Wood
in Miami District in December, it just gets bigger and bigger.
And not only that, but all the major brands are
getting into it and they're hiring and they're hiring people

(15:24):
like you. And they said, Banksy, look at Obay Shepherd.
There's so many there's so many successful stories. And that's
what I'm saying, like it's just another art form. But
just because the powers that be say that it's not
the right thing, you know, there's gonna always there's always
what any new movement is always going to be some opposition,
which is fine. I'm pretty sure. I'm pretty sure Picasso,
I'm pretty sure the van goes the grades of all times.

(15:46):
They all went through the resistance during the time. We
can't say we weren't there with the modern day with them,
with the street, with the streets, and we are the
modern day real artists. So you don't think it's a
cheesy thing to go on a graffiti tour. You think
that that's a good thing because I want good for
you to be monetized. I want going for you to
have the the contemporary respect that it deserves. Beyond the
streets in Brooklyn just hosted the most amazing thing ever,

(16:09):
and every single day there's more and more acceptance because
we are valid art form, just like any other valid
art form. Yeah. Well, it's really interesting to see how
the legal world and illegal world kind of come together.
You have to, you have to be comfortable with kind
of moving beyond those borders. Are is very subjective, is
very subjective. So can you tell us about the time

(16:32):
you worked, um, you traveled and made it work to
your advantage and being spontaneous. I would definitely tell you that,
but I'm going to give you a quick brief of
who I really am. I am from a blue collar neighborhood,
working class. Risk is all I know, and I love
taking risks. I love being spontaneous. I'm not really scared

(16:53):
to go to jail. I'm not scared of anything except God.
But besides that, going back to the trip, I'm super adventurous.
As you can tell. It's in my jeans. My parents
hopped the border just because they didn't want to be
where they are and they just made a living, you know.
So I'm so spontaneous. I'm just like, you know, let
me go to Asia. Because I've gone to so many

(17:14):
places in Europe and I got so many places in
in the America's South America, Central America. I'm like, I
want to go somewhere that I've never gone, like another continent,
you know. And people say, like a lot of travelers
that I'm out underworld, like if you want to go,
start with Thailand. And I heard a lot of greatings
about Thailand. So I went on a whim. I'll think,
you know what, you know, I'm going to Thailand. I

(17:35):
did not look up anything at all? Did you know
where to fly to? Did you say I'm going to
Bangkok and I'll take it from there. Did you know
I know that by by default always go to the
cities because I always want to do a little bit
of GRAFFREDI before I dive into like, you know, like
the deep end. You know. So when you landed, it's
Suvarna Boom Airport, which I like to say just because
I remember that it's Suvarna Boom Cake. Did you know

(17:56):
we're gonna be sleeping that night or did you just
land and say I'll figure it out. That's a good
question because a lot of times I get places and
I don't have no plan. I just trying to find
some WiFi, and like, it's a hustle around here. That's
how fly, that's how on the fly. But no, since
it was Thailand, I was a little bit. People were like, oh, yeah,
you're gonna get cut up and you're gonna get choped
up there. I'm like, yo, shut them up, like seriously,
like you don't even know what you're talking about. I've

(18:18):
been you know. I'm like, I don't even care if
that was the truth. Anyway, I'll still go and so
you figured out when you got there. Yeah, so anybody
travels like this anymore, and everybody the number of people
who tell me people I had a Google spreadsheet from
my trip, and I'm like, I don't, but you do
a lot of researchers. I know, I know, I know
where I'm sleeping. You have to understand this. My dad

(18:39):
has been traveling since was thirteen, and he's like like
sixty now. My dad has been working at airports for
combined at least forty years, and he's only like sixty.
Do you feel comfortable taking a flight and you're just
it's a cheap way to get there. Hearing my dad story,
she's like, I should just go somewhere. There was no internet.
I had a map and I just figured it out,
and I met people and I heard things. We just

(19:00):
did what we did. So I was like, yeah, that's
that's that's how I am, without even maybe indirectly being
influenced by that. Since it was Thailand, I at least
had one destination. I had it for one night in Bangkok,
but as soon as I got there, I'm like, uh,
I love I love figuring out the trains and the
and the and the how do I get there without
just taking a cab or uber or whatever case. Maybe

(19:22):
I'd like to just go there how they go there
the locals. I want to be as local as possible
everywhere I go. All right. So, yeah, I get to Thailand.
I get to Bangkok, I'm like, yeah, I'm in the capital.
This is essentially two hours. I get there and I'm like, okay,
where's the hospital? So I take the main train and
I go there. And you know, listen that number one
always get a same car. Do you need the same
card no matter where you go, because then you have

(19:43):
Google Maps and you have to sit. You're good. I
get to the hospital and I'm like, okay, I have
one night I'm in Bangkok. Cool, all right. So I'm
literally sitting there. I'm five minutes into there over here
because everybody next to me, I'm talking really loud, and
I came too early, so my checking I had to
wait like two hours. So I just sat down in
the you know, like by the I love going to
hospital because it's sole community. Here, two people talking and

(20:04):
one person is asking all the right questions. He's so insightful.
I could tell he's like just memorizing stuff. Because that's
the thing about me. I don't memorize nothing, because I
just I'm mass spontaneous. So sometimes I do look for
that stability and that, you know, the duality like the
ying and the yang. I'm like, this guy's an archive
and he has a good vibe from far away? How

(20:26):
do I feel this energy? And you're like very very
far away, like at least like the ten feet you know,
So from there I get I'm like, let me go
out to them, like I'm like, yo, what's up? And
he's like hi, you know, you know, he's he doesn't
know what I'm talking about. I come up in him,
like yo, what's up? And he's like hello, you know,

(20:46):
and I'm just like what's going on. He's like, I'm
just here. I'm in Bangkok. I'd be here for three days.
What's up with you? I'm like I just got here
like five minutes ago. And he's like okay, And I'm like,
what are you doing some what are you doing right now? Like?
What's going on? Was was wave? He's like, I'm going
to Carby. I'm going down south to the islands. I'm like,

(21:07):
could I come? He was like, xabala, I'm like what
he's like, he's like two is better than one, and
I was just like and we both started laughing. We
start laughing and okay, okay, okay, I'm like, you might
if by join And that's just like that, you've known
him for like fifteen minutes. At this point, you got
a sense he's got some good energy even less I
know him for like one minute, because I got there

(21:29):
and I was there five minutes. Then I went up
to him and within thirty seconds I agreed to go
with him down south. Okay, like to the Carby Islands.
You know. So then how long did you guys end
up spending together? How much time? This is a funny
story because the plan was to go for two or
three days. We bought it one way, like, yeah, let's
go through three days to the south. There's a bunch

(21:49):
of islands. He's like, he's like, I've been here three days.
This is a city. I mean, I could tell is
the city. I can't do much here, but you know
the usual. And you go to a big city, it's
the only party in drinking, drinking and for me, graffiti.
But at that trip, I wasn't too is my first
time in Asia, overwhelmed twenty four trip. I'm like, oh,

(22:13):
I'm gonna get him to graffiti at the state of
my name. Now I would bomb as soon as I
get I'm like, I'm going to start bombing at least
to two days and then we'll go somewhere else. But
that particular day and time, I'm just like grateful that
I got to Asia for the first time. So I'm
here in the hospital. Five minutes I speak to him

(22:35):
and under a minute I would agree to go to
Carbi with a stranger. Off of vibes and how far
away was that from Bangkok. It's like saying New York
to Miami. It's not It's not like it's not that crazy.
So you had to get on a plane like the
following day, the same day, the same day, so you're
like hostile. I don't actually need that room, give it

(23:00):
to someone lost one night. That's why I always under book,
always under plan. I always get somewhere and don't even
get a hostel. The only reason I got one night
is because I'm like, I'm in Asia, let me at
least sleep one night. I didn't. I didn't even did
you leave town without bombing anything? I didn't. Yeah, the
capital because I love bombing capitals, but I couldn't be

(23:22):
did you bomb the beach? Yes? We did? And did
this guy did? He was he new to the world
of street art or was he? Yes? And only that,
but it's the first time he ever left his country
of India. So, but the only reason I went up
to him because he sounded like he's been all over
the world. The questions he was asking, the way he

(23:44):
was our kind of stuff, the way he was I
only overheard it for a minute, and that's me while
working unconsciously hearing him. So when you told him, look,
I got to do this thing and I need you
to do look out for me, what did he say?
He loved it? He was like, what is that? He
never before and he's like he just laughed at it
because he was so much. He's like he understood what

(24:04):
I felt, the adrenaline, the rush. So he was just
like sometimes he would even he like, go do it,
go do it. I'm just like, alright, God, I'll just
watched out and he's like, oh, you created a monster. Yeah,
he was being like an enabler to like the adrenaline rush,
said I crave. But the funny part is that while

(24:25):
we were in Bangkok. He told me he's going to
go to Carby, and I'm like what time He said eight.
I'm like, okay, it's twelve now. And then we're like, well,
we have a couple of hours in Bangkok and he
just brought me out to the temples and so he
ended up showing you around bankokas quick. He's like, you
know what you're not, I'm missing nothing here. It's it's
a big city and all you want to see I

(24:46):
could show you in two three hours. So we literally
took the canals, which if you ever a Bangkok I
recommended cool, cool canals. And we saw like two or
three Buddhist temples and laughing Buddha the other It was great,
and I'm like, okay, I'm done with Bangkok. Let's go
to Carby. How long did you spend it in Carby.
This is the funniest part because we bought it one way.
It's like when I met him, I felt like, I

(25:09):
know my whole life. I felt like it was a
mirrorage of myself because when he was like, we're only
going to buy one way trip, I'm like, yeah, of
course we are. So it was like we knew each
other whole lives and we planned were like, yeah, we're
back in two two days. You know, let's go down
to the south, you know, check out the beaches and
come back. It ended up being two weeks just you
and him, two weeks all over Thailand. I'm not going

(25:29):
back to the capital. And it taught me a big lesson.
It basically taught me a lesson, like on their pack,
on their plan because during that trip, I had all
I had my backpack, but I also had a huge
luggage with jackets and different because I'm like, yeah, this
one's for the club and you can't travel with paint.

(25:51):
I was going to ask, so how do you get
your stuff when you're in a foreign place. It's always
hard because the minute you're buying a case of sprape
and everyone's like, what are you doing with that? That's
the beauty of it because finding a lot of times
I can't paint places because I can't I can't find paint.
And you said that you need like the high pressure
paint to do it really properly. So sometimes you find

(26:13):
like some local cheap brand, They're not cheaper like something
I'm not accustomed to. He's different, He's lower pressure. It's
different colors, and you have to like hunt for it,
you know, because some places like we don't use spray paint.
If you want to do a paint job, you have
to do it with the regular way you paint. And
so in this case in Thailand, what what what were
the materials like? So we do find Yeah, but after

(26:36):
digging and digging and digging, we found spray paint. And
this guy was loving And I always have I always
kind of markers because that I could bring from you know,
you could chat with that and have a nice tip
fat marker that is still has a very good graffiti aesthetic.
And this guy was loving it. This guy was like
he just he never saw graffed in his life, he

(26:57):
never saw live and he was just enabled in me
and watching my back. Were there ever any moments, I
know you said earlier that you're not afraid of anything,
and that's such a nice way to go through life,
But were there ever any moments and any of the travels,
either this trip to Asia or any of the times
that you've been traveling, that you think or thought, oh shit,
I've gotten myself into something. Maybe I shouldn't be doing

(27:19):
this right now. Definitely. When I was in Prove a
couple of months ago. Um, any time I see the law,
I get like very like, off, it's the law. You know.
I'm saying, they could lock you up in a cage
anytime you want, for any amount of time. And I'm
not from that country, so they'll definitely have no pity
on you. And I've heard horror stories about jails and
from all over the world, right and especially if you're

(27:41):
not you're not from there, how dare you do that?
You know? So when I was improved recently, Um, but
being that I know so many people there, and I
go with the right people. If I'm going to break
the law somewhere, I go with the right people. That's key.
Always literally your partners in craps, yes, literally, because then

(28:03):
they speak for you this and that the other and
you know, worst case scenario when I gotta call him
Prove like all the stuff, all they do is take
your paint. And I was like, this is it? Like,
you know, if I was back home, I'm getting locked
up at least at night and then I getting processed.
So when I saw how lenient stuff was in other countries,
I'll exploit that to the fullest. But that's not my fault,

(28:24):
that's their fault. Or they just have different priorities of course,
and paint is not a huge priority if they have
other things that they're dealing with. I mean, at the
end of the day, the biggest vandals are you know,
if you if you burn diamazons, if you burn first
forces down, if you're dumping oil in in in oceans,
you're the real vandal. So don't look at me saying

(28:46):
you are. When you're knocking down neighborhoods to build candles down,
you're the vandal. What advice would you have for somebody
who is afraid of taking risks but but likes with
the stories that you're telling and wants to add a
little bit a spontaneity to their next strip. What could
they do? What's the one thing that you don't be scared?
To reach out to strangers and always follow your gut

(29:08):
because you've got to lie to you. That's the divine
telling you what is when what is not. And not
every one of those bad things is a bad person,
and not everyone of those good things is a good person,
because that's all subjective, and that's all smoked mirrors. You
gotta go with your gut, Crudeo. It has been a
really great time to go on this adventure with you

(29:31):
bombing and tagging all over the world. So thank you
so much for coming in and talking to us and
sharing your stories. We're all going to follow you at
ww CRUDEO c r d O, w W c r
U d O on Instagram and maybe we'll run into

(29:51):
you somewhere and then we'll end up on vacation with you,
of course, and I'll introduce you. Guo seems indispensable. We
need him on our next everybody needs a guav for
their travel journeys. Thank you so much, Grudo, Awesome, Pavia,
Jolene Marcy. I appreciate everything, and that's our show. Thanks
for listening. If you like what you heard, please subscribe

(30:13):
and you know, leave us a five star review. Oh
Wait Ago is a production of I Heart Radio and
fathom You can find the details we talked about in
the show notes and on our website fathom away dot com.
Don't forget to sign up for our newsletter when you're there.
You can get in touch with us anytime at podcast
at fathom away dot com and follow us on all
social media at at Fathom. Way to go, please teg

(30:35):
your best travel photos hashtag travel with Fathom. If you
want a really good deep on the travel inspiration, pick
up a copy of our book Travel Anywhere And Avoid
being a Tourist. I'm Jarlyn Gerba and I'm Pavio Rosatti,
and we'd like to thank our producer, editor and mixer
Marcy to Peanut and our executive producer Christopher Hasciotis. For
more podcasts from My Heart Radio, visit the iHeart Radio app,

(30:57):
Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows.
Tach b to
Advertise With Us

Popular Podcasts

Dateline NBC
Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

If you've ever wanted to know about champagne, satanism, the Stonewall Uprising, chaos theory, LSD, El Nino, true crime and Rosa Parks, then look no further. Josh and Chuck have you covered.

The Nikki Glaser Podcast

The Nikki Glaser Podcast

Every week comedian and infamous roaster Nikki Glaser provides a fun, fast-paced, and brutally honest look into current pop-culture and her own personal life.

Music, radio and podcasts, all free. Listen online or download the iHeart App.

Connect

© 2024 iHeartMedia, Inc.