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October 2, 2023 44 mins

9021 -0h what fun! 

Brian Austin Green joins Lance on the pod to talk about what it was like being a teen star in the '90s. . . before cell phones and social media! He also shares what he learned about parenting a gay child, working closely with Sharna on their "Oldish" podcast, and whether DWTS is more challenging than "Special Forces."

 

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Speaker 1 (00:04):
This is Frosted Tips with Lance Bass and my Heart
Radio podcast. Hello, my little Peanuts, it's me your host,
Lance Bass. This is Frosted Tips with me Lance Bass
and my lovely co host that happened to be husband,
Michael Turkey Turching gob It's amazing. How work was good? Yeah, yeah,

(00:25):
let's introduce our guests. Bright Austin Green is with us today. Yes,
legit teen Idol All right now, the show is for
the ultimate fans of teen Idols and Brian you were
the epitome of that in the nineties. So what's really
funny is in synct was massive at the time. My
my niece Caitlin you were her favorite, like you she does. Yeah,

(00:53):
So it's funny to be talking to somebody because I
to me, we had such different experien apariences of it
because from music to television. Sean and I were just
talking about this last night and I was saying, how
it's amazing that you got You know, you went through
massive stadiums being packed packed with people, so you had

(01:14):
that instant knowledge and gratification with like, look at what
we're doing. We were doing a show that a ton
of people were watching, but we were shooting it in
van eyes and cause people wanting around. Yeah, we would
see it every once in a while when we go
do personal appearances at balls and stuff like that. But
we had we both had these like crazy yeah because experiences.

(01:37):
I compare them to in sync fans. Yeah, they're just
so passionate, so passionate. I mean I loved nine O
two one. I mean I was, I guess junior high
when that show was on, and my sister was a
huge I mean she was obsessed with New Kids and
nine O two one. Oh, So that made me a
fan of nine O two one and New Kids on
the Block, and it was just it was a fun time.
And I think that's why right now you're in this

(02:00):
crazy revival. Yeah, everyone's like have that nineties early two
thousands because everyone wants to remember the good times, the
innocent times of their youth. And now this new generation,
which I'm sure you're seeing two gen z, Like it's
like if we loved the fifties so much that that
just was so part of so much a part of

(02:21):
our lives. These gen zers are really taking in the
music of the nineties, the TV of the nineties, and
it's it's all these new fans are being born. Are
you seeing that with your past shows too? It's with
all like that. I just did nineties con Oh god,
that looks so fun. It was super It was super fun.
We were all together as a cast, which is amazing.

(02:44):
That happens very rarely, especially with Shannon too. It's so
nice to see her. Yeah, I mean the fact that
everybody was there, it was amazing. And yeah, this whole
like times coming back around in the nineties being popular
again is crazy. It's insane to be funny because when
I was living in the nineties, I specifically remember thinking

(03:08):
this will never become popular again. Like the fifties, sixties, seventies, eighties,
they were so defined and great, But it's because we
we had no idea that, I mean my opinion, and
I get it now. I remember, like when my parents
used to talk about all the music of the seventies,
I was like, oh, that's ridiculous, you know, And now
I do the same thing about the nineties. Like all
the nineties. Man, there was no music like there is.

(03:32):
Literally there was in the nineties. But I think living
in the nineties, we had no idea that moving forward generationally,
that there there weren't going to be things that made
such an impact as music and television and all of
that did in the nineties. Because once the internet really
came around in the late nineties, everything changed everything. And

(03:55):
you don't you're you know, I don't know if you're
going to see again what it was that existed from
the nineties and before, because everyone is so spread out
and just has their own little, you know, fan areas,
and there's so many options of television shows and there's
so many options you're gonna find your little things. And
also everyone's connected now like before, like yeah, we sort

(04:18):
of like you know, anonymous kind of hanging the back,
and so it made in sync more mysterious and more
mysterious because you only get to know people from reading
teen magazines or seeing us at appearances, and you could
really control that narrative a lot more absolutely, you know,
if you wanted someone to think you're this way, like
it was just it was easier. Now you can't get
away with anything. People are like authentic, oh, I you know.

(04:41):
And what was great too is as a as a
kid for the pop culture, you were kind of you
were like fed what to like, you know, with television,
there was only a certain amount of channels, so you
had to go watch the show. And if everyone was
into nine O two one oh, you were into Everybody
was into it because you were only cool if you
were music trl you everyone had to go to one

(05:04):
place after school to see all their music, so corn
To to Backstreet Boys everyone, but you were kind of
forced to be like, Okay, these are the these are
the ten artists that I love because they told me
I have to love this is popular, this is whatever
you wanted to be. You're going to be the odd
man out. You wanted to be cool, you want to
be in the clubs like the Finals, V one and

(05:26):
Different don't Knock some VH one, Follicle and Natalie Merchant
on VHS one. But this whole research has been great
and I love things like I don't know if you've
seen ever Coming, and Fitch now has done the whole
new rebrand company. Yeah, it's so good. It's still got
that nineties look to it, but way better stuff. That's cool.

(05:55):
These companies are really taking advantage of like Okay, we're
gonna get these people what they want, and I love it.
It just it kind of reminds me of because you know,
the last a couple of weeks a bit of a
little insane with in sync fandom. Had no idea that
the fan base would go that nuts for this, but
everyone is really wanting to feel that just yeah, and

(06:18):
then the tailor to a simpler time and yeah. And
it just reminds me because I went to the Taylor
Swift concert and did you oh yeah, super jealous. I
always loved her, even you know, when she was a
country singer, Like, I just always loved her and I
loved I appreciate everything she does for the world, like
she just brings out so much positivity. And so at

(06:38):
the concert, yes, I loved watching her and the songs great,
but it was the feeling of everyone around you just
having the best time, so happy, exchanging friendship bracelets with
you know, people at the concession stand and security and
just smiling, and it just made me feel so good.
I'm like, Wow, this is this is what everyone's missing
right now. So just being all together, just forget the

(07:00):
worries of the world right now and just having the
best time ever. And that's what I'm feeling now is happening.
I feel like there was a major shift at the
beginning of the year too, Like I know, this is
the age of Sagittarius. We sort of moved into that
and so it's much more no the age of Aquarius.
So we moved into this place where everybody is like, uh,

(07:20):
really much more open to experience with people. And then
they're they're too inating better, Yeah, because we went through
a few years there where it was so contentious. We

(07:44):
are here at the Green Valley Ranch. Have you have
you been here before? I've never been to this hotel before.
It feels it feels much more like adult and responsible there. Yeah,
it really is like palm desert and like a nice
It was like ten thirty last night and I was like,
this is I'm up way past my bed usually in

(08:06):
bed by like eight thirty, Like I'm on that schedule.
Us two. I mean we have you know, your kids
are a little older now, but you know ours are
two and so it is six thirty. That's one of
you guys have two that are twins. So you've been
that's a I don't know how you do Like I
have five kids, which people here and they go, how
do you do it? But I couldn't. I couldn't for
a second because we started with two, so like we

(08:30):
don't know how hard but right. But but at the
same time I do because I could just imagine having
one and being like, oh, it's like having zeros. What's
funny is looking back on it now, like I remember
when when Noah was young and feeling like so overwhelmed.
I was like, I don't know how to do this
and this is so hard, And looking back on it now,

(08:51):
it's like, man, I could one one. That's because we're
I think it's very important, especially older, they get that
they do separate things, right, because it's twins, you know,
they start super important. Yeah, just be attached, right and
so and it is a board of girl, so I
want them to have different experiences because their own likes.
But when we do separate them and like you know,

(09:11):
he'll take one to lunch or like I'll take one
in the backyard, it's so easy. So it is just like,
oh my god, just one. You could pass one back
and forth from two to three. That's that's the big
difference because you have to change up your defensive style.
At that point you're playing zone defense. I'm going to
cover this half of them, you cover that half and

(09:34):
then you're just like, Okay, if if you know, some
drunk kid wanders over into my side, then you're like, okay,
bubble wrap everything and you literally so yeah, it's a
whole different, whole different third. But it's not working. It's
not I'm like, great with two right now, mess with
a good thing. We figured this out. His main amazing

(09:54):
is if we go to Disney, one will have to
ride by themselves or everything's set up for a flying
in an airplane. Right I'm a big fan of even numbers,
and that just at that point everything everything's off kilter.
I like things the way that I like two of
everything or one of ever get that because I agree that,

(10:15):
So we're just gonna have to have two more. Huh okay,
so both right, this isn't going well. I'm feeling I'm
I'm all for a third right now until our kids
are out of diapers and just use the bathroom by themselves.
Then I'm gonna say, nope, I don't want to go
back there. No, it is. That is the toughest thing

(10:36):
like to be for for me to have a fifteen
month old and be back into that stage of like, oh,
I've got to do everything for me old. My my
older kids are much more self sufficient. They'll get up
in the morning, they'll make their own breakfast, and you
kind of come downstairs and they're already doing their own
thing and they're kind of dressed and ready for school. Yeah,

(10:57):
I'm still yelling and going. You got to put socks
in shoes on where you like, you can't go out
the door that way. It's raining outside. You you can't
have shorts and a T shirt on like this. You know,
your outfit choices don't match what's happening outside. Okay, you
have to be the coolest dad. Like I couldn't imagine
my dad being Brian Houston Green. Uh, you're so because

(11:18):
you're you're twenty one year old, out and gay and
proud and you know, and it's you're there. He was
so lucky to be able to be in your family,
because so many kids out there don't get that, and
even if their parents accept them, there's a lot of
times where the kids still knows that, they still disagree
with it. But you it's like I just I think

(11:40):
they're just so lucky to have you in their It
was it's it's been fascinating, Like it's been I've I've
really it's been a challenge just because honestly, it was
my son being gay. It was just it was unknown
for me. But I'm not. I think a lot of

(12:00):
people are afraid of the unknown, whereas I'm not. To me,
it's intriguing and I want to learn about it. So
it was like we would I would get into these
conversations with Cash where it was like I really want
wanted to understanding the things that seem so different to
me at first, and then you realize like, oh, this
isn't different at all. It's just your choice of partner

(12:23):
and your it's it doesn't affect me at all. Yeah,
And that's the thing I'm always trying to beat into
people now, it's like, it doesn't it does not affect you. Yeah,
So why are you why do you care so much?
And why are you trying to somehow bully your feelings
in your opinion into something that literally does not affect

(12:44):
you at all. Well, usually it's the case that it
really is affecting them at a way they don't want
to admit, right, Yeah, I've seen that a lot. You
have a new podcast. Yeah, she's so great. Tell us
about the podcast. So it's it's Sharna and myself and
Randy Spelling. Yes, and Randy whose sister Tori was one.

(13:10):
He's been a you do a few episodes too. I
feel like he did do a few episodes, and then
he did Malibu Shorts, which he was another which was
another Spelling show. And I played his older brother on
Malibu Shorts. So he's been a professional life coach for
fifteen plus years. It's what he does. He lives in Portland.
He's married, he has two daughters. He's an incredible human being.

(13:34):
Like he's very He's so good at just connecting with
people and helping you talk through things and listening which
which people are. My God, I need him in my life.
Thinks he's If you haven't gotten a chance to really
sit down and speak to him yet, you should. He's really, really,
so crazy, amazing person. I saw him last night for

(13:54):
the first time maybe in fifteen years. I mean we
back in well, I guess twenty years ago. We definitely
run into this. How crazy is that years ago? Yeah?
Twenty five years Yeah, Like, oh my gosh, it just
keeps getting longer and longer. But I always remember he
was so sweet. Of course, you know, Tori, and we
love Toru, but yeah, I mean, I think that it
is so amazing that you can find something like being

(14:17):
life coach and that's such a gift someone. It's amazing.
He and he, you know, we've been talking about it
as we've been doing the show, and there was a
lot about Randy's life that I didn't know. I mean,
I've known him for as long as I have. Did
you have trouble with sobriety that he had troubles with sobriety?
He really, honestly, I think at the end of the day,

(14:38):
had trouble with finding what his thing was in life,
what his purpose was, and so it was like he
would find these ways of connecting with people, but he
didn't understand like being a life coach and how you
could connect with people that way. And so the podcast
that we're doing now is we do two episodes a week,

(15:00):
So we have every Tuesday night, the first one drops
and we have a topic, whether it's co parenting, or
it's it's addiction, or it is disappointment or like those
are the things we've been we've started tackling. And then
on Thursday, we have a live version of what our

(15:21):
topic was where people are able to call in sending
questions and be a part of the conversation. And so
we do we try and do a real deep dive
of those those things and take sort of the stigma
out of those conversations. And it's amazing. The last one
we just did was about addiction, and so we really
got into Randy's story. Shanna had a story also, She's

(15:45):
come from a place of addiction also and what brought
her to the place she's in now. And it's it's
amazing when you realize that people have to go through
those things sometimes to learn from them and grow and
become they They are the people that they are now
because of those experiences. And I think when people realize, like, oh,

(16:07):
there's a put there's a light at the end of
the tunnel, you just have to stick it out. You
have to be willing to look for silver linings and
be open to the people that are around you and
truly listening and learning and being kind and loving. It's
amazing what can grow out of that. Working with a
loved one can be tricky sometimes, as I know, But

(16:31):
is there something that you that you were surprised about?
And doing the show that you learned about her. I well,
I mean getting obviously getting into like the addiction episode
is is deep because we're kind of asking questions of
each other. And I remember I had asked her at
one point because she had these glaring moments during during

(16:57):
her times that her low times, where she really felt
like there was something calling to her and pointing out like, hey,
this is this is not where I'm supposed to be.
So I asked her, I said, do you do you
in looking back on it, do you feel like there
were other times where those things were trying to call
to you also, but you weren't really paying attention to him.

(17:20):
And it forced her back into that time when she
was living in that period, and she it felt like
a different world for her. She was like, oh, this
is that Like that person then is not the person
that is sitting on the couch now. So I think
that discovery for her was a great then discovery for me.
But we we came into it and we've our relationship

(17:45):
has grown and done so well because we feel like
we've been on the same path from the point that
we met to now, and that's an important thing to
feel like, I know, our moral code matches we we
can have differences of opinion in things, but we still
have a moral code where we know how to handle

(18:08):
those situations and not judge each other for the differences,
but each other and love each other. Yes, have you
always been like this or is this something that you
just learned throughout the years? It's I'm I'm fifty. It
took me fifty years, and it took a lot of
like stumbling and a lot of disappointments and a lot

(18:30):
of things not happening the way I thought I wanted
them to happen. Thank God. Like, looking back on things
in life, it's like, man, thank you for things not
turning out the way I wanted them to, because the
way I wanted them to would have put me on
a path that was absolutely the wrong. Sometimes you thank

(18:51):
God for unentered prayers. Yes, so many times will disappoint
It's like and I'm like, it's disappointing in the moment
and you're in them and you're going why it, Like
what good is gonna We're like, thank God, you didn't
do that. Thank God that happens. Like you know, you're

(19:14):
in those moments and you think like why, like why
is this? What good is going to come out of this,
and then six months down the line, a year down
the line, you look back on it, you go, I
thank god that happens when you go through this all
the time. Even just with this, doing these couple things,
I just didn't think people would care with if we
didn't have anything, and I was talking to people are

(19:35):
gonna freak out no matter what, like as a like
a fan of everything, you're giving them your life now.
So you had one perspective when in Sync was first
starting long time ago. So now you are who you
are now. So it's it's interesting for people to see
the growth and who you all become individually, and and

(19:59):
the fact that you are like as uh as open
and honest and kind as you are that is that's
an amazing thing for friends to see days well, because
amazing you can never be, you know, in the group
I was. I keep looking at myself in interviews. I'm like,
oh my gosh, that was just not me, you know.

(20:20):
I was like, there were smarts of me in there,
but but it really was such a different person. You're
in the closet, you're hiding half of your personality and everything.
I mean, you had to you in the closet back then,
when were you aware of Oh? No, I I at
five years old on you I was gay, So like,
you know, I've dealt with this, yeah, immediate. Yeah, Like

(20:41):
and most of my friends say the same thing, like, yeah,
my first memory is being gay, So you know, it's
it's it's weird that people still can't accept that you're
just born that way because like what happened to me
as all that, Like okay, I just like guys now,
like yeah, so ridiculous. All right, let's take it back

(21:14):
because these fans love when we talk about our beginnings. Now,
you were born in Van Nuys. I was born in
Van I grew up. I was raised though in North Hollywood. Okay,
my parents are still in the same house Valley Village. Village.
Valley Village is gotten crazy now crazy. My parents bought
their house for thirty five thousand dollars in nineteen seventy two,

(21:38):
and it just a praise for like one point, it's crazy.
Can you imagine buying a house for thirty five thousand dollars?
And my dad was like at that point, I was like,
oh man, thirty five thousand dollars. It was a lot
more money. Yeah now, but Ford houses Now, it's just
like the wealth distribution is so stupid, especial in California.

(22:00):
What was the family dynamic? Like, family dynamic was great
my dad. My dad's a drummer, so I grew up
in music. He was touring with Glenn Campbell and I
was born and raised. He played on like Ryanstone, Cowboy
and Sit the Southern Nights Tour and all that stuff.
And he stopped touring as I was getting older because
you're away so much when you're touring, and I would

(22:22):
see him and he would It would take him a
few days for that readjustment of me realizing like, oh,
that's dad. Yeah, And he hated that. So he then
crossed over into doing more studio stuff. He played like
Sinatra and that's gonna be tough. And we discussed this too,
because hypothetically, if we do go on another tour, right,
what is that going to look like with my two

(22:43):
year old kids? Your kids are old enough though at
this point where they have that strong connection with you.
I mean we're talking about like I was an infant
at the point when so he would come home and
he'd be excited to see me. But I still totally
turn around and grab onto my mom like a koala bearry.

(23:04):
And so was music your first love? Because yeah, I
went to school just for music, and then I stumbled
upon acting, because how did you how did you get
into acting? I was going to a music academy on
the thirty second Street, uh that it was called thirty
second Street Cool School and it was on the USC campus.
So one of the kids that I rode the bus with, uh,

(23:26):
he was acting, and I thought it was so cool
because he always had like all these cool toys and
stuff on the bus. And I was like, you know,
are your parents rich, Like how did this happen? He
was like, oh, no, I do commercials. And I didn't understand.
To me, TV was like this magical box and people
that were in it were different from you know, like, oh,

(23:47):
you couldn't a normal person couldn't be in that box.
I ended up doing a few student films with directors
that were going to USC studying, and I kind of
stumbled into it, and then it just became so prominent
in my life, and it was such a form of income,

(24:07):
and it was like I had to put music and
all that stuff on hold because I just didn't have
time for it. Well, it was a good thing because
take us back to the moment you got cast in
nine o two one, So the moment I got cast,
it wasn't a big moment I at that point in

(24:32):
in my life. In the life of an actor, pilot
season and doing a pilot was part of what you did.
You worked all year, you tried to do commercials, and
you tried to do guest things, you know, guest appearances
on different shows, and then it was pilot season around
like February, and everybody would go and you book a
pilot and you would shoot a pilot, and then it

(24:54):
was like, okay, back to the grind, and then all
of a sudden you did like, oh, okay, I've got
nine more episodes to do this thing. Oh that's cool.
So nine o two when I was a pilot, and
it was one of I had already done like thirteen
at that point I had been acting. I started. I
was in SAG when I was nine years old. What
was your first gig I did? It was a bank

(25:15):
commercial that never aired, But I remember I had been
auditioning for things for like a year, and I hadn't
booked anything, and I didn't get it. I was like,
I don't understand how this works. And then I booked
my first commercial and that light bulb moment happened in
my head where I was like, oh, I get what
casting directors are looking for and how it works. And

(25:37):
from that moment on, I was booking everything that I went.
I did probably close to seventy commercials. Who I ended
up doing uns Landing, this nighttime soap. I did that
for four and a half years, and I was young.
I was like ten and a half at that point
when I when I started doing that, I couldn't imagine

(25:58):
being that young in this business because it's not old
business and you have to grow up quickly. And I
can imagine, especially you starting so young and being on
such a cult to show that you know, everyone treats
you like adults. It was really It was really cool
though for me, like I with not with Notts Landing,
I was I was the only kid on a show
with adults. It was a nighttime soap, so every once

(26:21):
in a while, like every other episode, they would just
prance my character through the back because I was the
son of one of the leads on the show. I'm
looking at a picture, she show. Yeah, so that show.
Joan van Ark was, Bill Devane was on, Ted Shackleford,

(26:42):
Michelle Williams like Nicole Sheridan was on who then went
on to do So. It was so cool to be
there because I would kind of sneak on set and
watch how I was. I would watch how they did it,
and I was kind of expected to be act as

(27:04):
an adult, like be professional when I was I was
a kid. My god, So I was doing set school
and all the stuff was so interesting. But I learned
so much as a kid doing it, and then I
thank god I always had a really strong moral compass
from my parents. They always just beat into my head

(27:27):
and ingrain this concept of, you know, being professional and
being kind to people that were around, and their their
focus was much more on being liked, which it was.
It had its benefits, but then it also gets in
your head a little bit, and I had to get
that out of my system a little bit, because you

(27:48):
create this false sense of like, I will do whatever
it takes to be like and then I'll put my
emotions and my feelings aside to make sure everybody else
is good. So I had to work past that a
little bit. Yes, but they didn't amazing. It's they didn't
like being a teenager in Hollywood, and you know, having

(28:08):
fame in an era where there was no cell phones
or pictures being taken. Only like twelve of us, well
actors like Leo DiCaprio and like we all newly documentary.
It kind of like really showed what it felt like. Yeah,
it was this small little world and everybody knew. You

(28:29):
saw like Seth Green in there, you saw Leo in there,
you saw like Stephen Dorff, and you saw like the
group of and it was this small but it was
amazing because there was no real competition among us because
we were all so different. It was like, oh, okay
they cast Seth Green. Oh you're looking for a little

(28:49):
redhead kid. Okay, that's perfect. That he's fair. You know
he's fair, and good for him. Like there was We
would all see each other at auditions and be like, hey,
how have you been. What's been going on? Is that
it was an amazing It was amazing. A bunch of
those I keep up with a lot of them. Nice. Yeah,
it's there's a there's a cool connection in having those

(29:10):
We used to do these like teen magazine trips like
Team Beat used to do these weekend trips where it
was they would rent a bus and we would all
get on the bus and we'd fill out the forms
of like favorite color, favorite things, and they would print
that in the magazine and then it was like this
trip we would all go to Marine Land, and so
it was like, you know, your favorite star is going

(29:31):
to Marine Land. We would all it would just be
this like complete from page one to page whatever. It
was the original influencer, it was this. It was this
like you know, it was this like this sort of
episode almost of like, hey, the trip and the fun thing,
and that's what the issue was about. It was it
was really cool. I told you, you know, it's good

(29:53):
when I haven't even gotten to the first, not even
gotten beast the first. Yeah, but I want to make
sure that we get what you want out in this episode.
You want to know. It's honestly, I'm here for for
what you guys are doing. So okay, yeah, yea, yeah,

(30:14):
is this thing? Okay? So you're gonna be on Special
Forces soon? Which all right. One, you did dance when
the Stars obviously, which to me was probably the hardest
thing I've ever done in my entire life. It was
yeah because your season seven, yes seven, so I had
done a hard Like I had literally done a hard
pass on that show fifteen seasons and counting. They would
come to me every year and it was like, why

(30:36):
are you guys even coming to me? Like it's no
you know, every single Joey did it. I was like,
oh wait, this kind of looks fun. Yeah, but I
was like, there's that I Searn and I ended up meeting.
We had started dating. It was the pandemic, so there
wasn't much going on, and so then they approached again
and they were like, hey, we know you've been a
hard pass, but here's it'd be interested. You and Sharna

(30:58):
would obviously be paired together. And I had done these
trips with her where she had done professional sort of
dancing things, like we were in uh we were in
Universal Orlando and Disney Orlando because she was doing this
big dance convention and there were all these little girls
that just would were like, you know, giddy when she

(31:20):
would walk in a room because she is she's one
of the best in the world and what it is
she does. I know when people don't realize that, like
with all of these I'm dancing with the stars. All
the pros are like superstars in their world. That's it.
That show absolutely so. So I was fascinated by it,
and I didn't understand the world. I didn't understand how

(31:42):
much work really went into it for her to be
at the point where she was. So then you do
this show and it's like you're you're learning technique and
all these Like I grew up dancing, just kind of like, oh,
if you feel it, dancing like that was my sad circle.
You do whatever, whatever dance moves you've learned. And you know,

(32:05):
I was Roger rabbiting everyone. Yeah, it took me a
little while to get down Rabbit. So, yeah, you're jumping
in and it's a seven day you know, it's a
seven day a week. Yeah, you have life. My relationship ended,
but I was like that, yeah, yeah, I mean it's
just I lost twenty pounds very quickly. I remember when

(32:27):
they first pitched it to me, they were like, oh,
you know, it's in the beginning, it'll be like two
hours a day, it's really simple, and then it's like
once you're in it, you're like, oh my, I want
to do this for like seven hours a year, and
I want to do this seven days a week because
it's live on Monday and I don't want to look
like an idiot dummy. Yeah, and then a weird because
you're getting around the floor terms, you're learning two to

(32:48):
three dances in a week, and then it never goes
perfectly until you go live for some reason, like the
rehearsals everything like it didn't go well for you though
you had the mentality of you've been learning correa see
because of what you do, and it was like it
was a little more natural I would assume for you
to fall. Once you learn the technique of it, then

(33:08):
it's like, oh, I'm good with choreography because again we
were hip hop dancers, so everything's you know, low and down,
and then everything in the ballroom was up. This is
like perfect the frame it was just hurt. But yeah,
thank god. I mean even I started in show choir
and then and sync and it was all choreography. So
it just really taught me how to just it. Almost
hard for me too, was being because the man is

(33:31):
supposed to lead in those dances. So she had to
teach me choreography to the point where I was good
enough at it that I could lead her even though
she was the one dragging me around the floor, like
she had to make it look like I was the
one that was dragging her. And I always thought that
on the show it must be. It's kind of harder

(33:53):
men because you have to lead and take dance and
most of the men who go on the show are
not dancers. Have a lot of them women, all of
their monsters. They you know, they'll just spin you around
and do it and they're they're how scary is it
for the lady because yeah, you're with you know, a
new dancer, and you have to trust that they're not
going to drop you on your head. Yeah, it's just

(34:14):
it's dangerous. Yeah. We were like we were working on
dips and things and she was like, oh no, you
do it this way, and she but she's putting all
of her trust seeing you doing stuff, and I was like,
I wouldn't trust me if I were you. So what
was hard or Dancing with the Stars or Special Forces?
Totally different, totally different Special Forces looks. It's intense because

(34:37):
it is so much more immersive than you think. Like
going into it, I thought like, Okay, there's gonna be
challenges and things we do, so I can prepare for that,
and then mentally, I can prepare for just being yelled
at all the time, and so I'll be good. I
can get through that. But then once you're there. We
shot in New Zealand. It was wind dead of winter

(34:59):
for them. There's snow on the ground, it's freezing cold.
We were We had barracks that were just these like
plain wooden walls. We had like we had a we
had a stove basically in two rooms. We had a
drying room in that room. Drying room meaning we were
in water in the cold, like they had to cut

(35:20):
squares out of the ice in frozen lakes for us
to do things. So it was it was really intense.
So you don't you don't think about the concept of like, Okay,
the challenge sucks, but then afterwards you're jumping in ice
water fully clothed. You then have a dry pack in
your backpack. You have to go into a room and

(35:40):
change into dry clothes and keep yourself from So it's
that it's grueling and you're so immersed in it and
it's it's real like you were going through this training. Yeah,
that's something I don't think I want to experience. Absolutely not.
I mean maybe when I was younger, there's something cool
about it though I was and I believe so there

(36:01):
is something that like in experience like that unless you're
in the military, yeah, and you've been doing there's no
other way in life. And I think everyone should feel
that at some point in their lives. Like I love
that Israel forces you to have to go through military
training because I think everyone needs to know what that
is so that we can all kind of see I mean,
because you know, the military is a big part of

(36:22):
this world. I think, so just keep it. Lands could
never Lands. I remember Charon was like, oh, you should
like do cold showers and stuff leading up to because
you're gonna have to do water things there. And I
was like, I can't. I can't turn the shower on
cold and there's no I was like, you know what,
I would rather just suck it up, jump in when

(36:44):
I have to do, and then be done with it.
Then like prep, can't prep You're gonna be cold every time,
And she's like, oh, you should do ice bounds. I
was like, nope, I'm good all I'm just gonna like
just gonna go with it as it comes. Again. In
my twenty eighth U have loved us what that experience was.
But now I just know if I did the show
the first day, I would tear a shoulder or something.

(37:07):
I mean, I would be out, but my body would
not be able to handle that anymore. It's well, and
it becomes it's so grueling that it you get so
sore in living that way that that becomes the thing
of like can I do these next challenges? Not can
I do them? But can I do them without hurting myself?
Because I hurt so bad just in moving and living.

(37:28):
And then you start realizing like, oh, this is a
young person's thing because my body does not recover and
to continue doing this three tons of sad feeling to
realize your body's like your season, right, Yeah, oh god,
I bet he's going to go through it. He uh,

(37:50):
he's a he's a he's a young guy, but he's
a really good person. He just it's you know, it's
hard to navigating life when you're under the microscone and
you would have these conversations where it was like, dude,
I like you now have access to Instagram and lives

(38:13):
and all of that, like be willing to put yourself
out there a little bit be human because people are
People are accepting of people being human and making mistakes.
If you would always human human, make those mistakes and
you acknowledge the mistakes that you made instead of playing
the like, you know, well, what did you expect? People

(38:34):
don't They don't respond to that. You wanted you to
be authentic, so you're human. Sit there and you you like,
genuinely apologize for things and mistakes that you've made and
anybody that you hurt within making those mistakes. People are
open to that because everybody does that. That's we're human.
We're human beings and like, and we're also add like,

(38:55):
the next scandal that comes out, people are going to forget.
You might as well make good on that rather than
be on the like it's only gonna be news for
like two days. If you just come out and apologe
you can anything, and then all of a sudden they're
reporting on the next scan scandal. Thing passes. I always say,
these two shall pass, bro, What what's next? What can
we expect besides Oldish? Honestly the podcast right now? Yeah,

(39:19):
specially the show, and then I I sort of am
in a place in my life where I don't really
plan much ahead. I'm just sort of in it day
to day and it's and I'm at a point too
where I'm trying to say yes to as many things
as I can actually do just for the experience of them,

(39:40):
because you never know. It's even in these things that
you do that are crazy that you say yes to,
you come out of them and you go, I'm so
glad I did that. I did, and do it while
you're young, because it's just like special Forces. For me,
I've only got about five years. I feel like our
generation definitely U we took better care of ourselves. But

(40:01):
I do feel like we or just we move better.
We got we got lucky because our generation forward has
been open to so many more things, and medicine has
progressed in such an incredible way. Mental health has progressed
in such an incredible way. I wish that on everyone.

(40:23):
It's like, you know, when you've got when we're talking
about the medical system and healthcare for for all, it's
like that includes mental health. Bran. It's so great to
have you on the show. So good to finally me.
It's weird because we've been in the same yea fear
like for so for your birthday, saying at the same time,

(40:49):
We're like and it was one of those things. I'm like, wait,
I told Sara that and Sharna, she's so amazing. She
was like, I honestly I saw Lance there too, and
she linked you out and she was like, I think
Lances and his husband's over there in the corner pointed
you guys. I was like that Bran, So what's funny. Though,
what's funny is Sharna's first thought was like, they have

(41:11):
no idea who I am, so there's no reason to
go over and say. But it's that it's that weird thing.
It's like I people think that celebrities all know each
other is and they expect it. I see people all
the time where I'm like, just it was cool seeing them. Yeah,
He's like, and I'm like that, shut up. It's so

(41:35):
I want to be crazy we do that. But yeah, Rosewood, God,
that was an amazing hotel to be and now we
know each other and now we can go together double
day probably it was like, that's my favorite hotel. It's
amazing thinking we were gonna go hiking and seeing Santa
Barbara and all this type of stuff. We didn't leave
the hotel it's so amazing, it's so odd. We were

(41:57):
talking about the train that was like who was it
that walked on that property? And they were like, yes,
this is the one. We're going to decorate the train
tracks and somebody that works it. It's gonna be like
freight trains running carrying fuel and we were cattle and
all those things. Only Caruso could build a place that

(42:20):
is probably the most expensive place in Santa Barbara with
a train going right through it. So expensive. Yeah, we
were in a room and it was like, I don't
think I've ever spent this much money on a room.
Those rooms were Yeah, man, it was insane. Yeah, possibly
that's great. All right, guys, thank you so much for
being here. I'm just gonna have because I know I

(42:41):
could talk another two. Absolutely, for sure. I would love to.
Next time we'll get to the questions. Yeah next, I
didn't even get to question number talking about. We actually
do want to just fly through a few because we
do have questions. So let one O two. Did you
enjoy nineties con Absolutely, it was super fun. It was
like summer camp honestly for us. Uh, you still dance
with Sharna? I don't I my body here I'm fifty.

(43:06):
I can't. I can't really dance the way I used
to when I was younger. But we we are. We're
working on something right now that we want to shoot,
just to put out on social media. It's just kind
of a nice movie. Keep Moving, might be crazy dance moves,
Keep Moving. Who is your favorite nineties artists or band?

(43:27):
From What Is It? Media? Melanie Oh TLC was one
of them. Yeah, I know Chilian and really well, and
so it's it's I love the Chili and Matthew relationship. Yes,
I think that's a good man. I don't know them. Yeah,
it's a cool like it looks like it works so well. Yeah,

(43:50):
I love it. Just a good couple. And then the
last one here from G for You eighty one? Did
you keep anything from David Silver's wardrobe? And I kept
I kept a scribe book of what to never wear again. Yeah,
that was basically well, thanks again for being here, guys,

(44:12):
Thank you so much for listening. Be good to each other,
don't drink and drive, take care of those animals, and
until next time, says hey, thanks for listening. Follow us
on Instagram at Frost the Tips with Lance and Michael
Urson Art and at Lance Bass for all your pop
culture needs, and make sure to write us review and

(44:32):
leave us five stars six if you can see you
next time.
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