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August 7, 2023 48 mins

Color us impressed! 

90's hitmakers Color Me Badd hit the top of the charts with songs like "I Adore Mi Amor" and "I Wanna Sex You Up."

You'll 'Wanna' hear singer Mark Calderon reveal how the R&B group came up with their colorful name, how they got their first big break (it involves Bon Jovi), and whether he keeps in touch with any of his former bandmates.  

Plus, Color Me Badd's appearance on "90210" gave the teen drama their most-viewed episode of all time. . . but you won't believe what the appearance did for the band's record sales!  Lance gets all the scoop! 

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mark as Played
Transcript

Episode Transcript

Available transcripts are automatically generated. Complete accuracy is not guaranteed.
Speaker 1 (00:04):
This is Frosted Tips with Lance Basso podcast. Hello, my
little peanuts, it's me your host, Lance Bass. This is
Frosted Tips with Me and my beautiful Hubby Turkey Turchin. Hello. Um,
and it is hot as hell. Damn it is the
rest of yards of boiling too. But it was it

(00:27):
kind of I thought the summer was gonna be milder.
They said it was gonna be milder. It's not. Well,
it was mild up until the past like week or so,
and then it's just it's like in the hundreds. Now, yeah,
it's it's human bad. And then May it was so great,
and even most of June was great because it was
actually cold. It was cold every night, fifties sometimes dipped
to the forties. Right in June, it was. And now

(00:50):
it is not. It is not, lord guys. It is
brutal the whole country. I just, yeah, the climate crisis
is real, people. I mean I read like a couple
of weeks ago that thought the water around Florida, which
means are going to get it, says around the Keys
and Miami beats. The water was one hundred and one
degrees in the ocean. I mean, I know, I know.
I like that it's a hot tub on the Beats

(01:11):
in Miami Beats. I mean that's perfect for me. Yeah. Oh,
there's nothing better than Miami Beach water, even in January.
Oh in January can be nice, but it's nothing worse
when you go to that Beats in the summer, which
you should never do, and you can't and you're like,
I'm dying. It's so hot. Let me jump into this nice,
beautiful ocean and you get in and it's like hot
and you're like gotta get escaped. Man. Oh man, Well

(01:34):
stay hydrated out there, people, because it's not going away
anytime soon. It's only gonna get worse. So yay, Wow,
way to start off on a positive note. U. Anything
else positive we can talk about before we get to
some good music. Well, we took our babies for their
first hike. Oh yeah, they're hikers now they are, they're
expert hikers. But we did not The attire was not

(01:55):
right because we didn't know that we would be really hiking.
We were just kind of walking up the street and
we lived next to a park. Let's go on this
hiking trail that's not really cut. Yeah, very well, but
they did it. Yeah, but they're in shorts and like
little shoes and I'm thinking snakes out now. Yeah, so
we have to get them really good hiking boots. Um,
I don't know, what do you what do you put

(02:16):
on kids to go hiking? Just jeans and hiking boots? Yeah? Walking?
We need good recommendations parents out there. Okay, our kids
they outgrow shoes every week, so we never have anything
any that really fit. All right, So can you give
us some recommendations on shoes that maybe you're a little
I don't know, bigger that I don't know, can stratch

(02:36):
or like they last a little longer as just something
that lasts a little longer. Hiking boots? What hiking do
they make? Hiking? Get them sneakers? Let's we're not going,
We're not, I'm telling, but I'm scared of snakes. We
have lots of snakes here. Well, that's why you have
to help all you have to You have to be
right near them the whole time. That's why I got

(02:57):
them their leashes so they can't wander off. Oh yeah,
another thing you can dam us this parents, What are
your thoughts on leashes? Because I'm all farm like when
I'm when I'm at a theme park and I see
kids with those little backpack leashes. First, I think it's
cute as hell. Yeah, and also it's also responsible parenting.
You want your kids to fly off in the middle
of nowhere. I mean the armed ones. To me, I

(03:17):
would not do the arm ones because it feels like
you're just I don't know, you're like when you grab
someone's hand, like the kids are. It's also a good
way the arm ones because you just haven't tethered to
your hand, so you don't even have to pull them.
It's just like they can only go as far as
your hand, so then like they're attached to you at
all times and you could still do stuff. Well, that's
a backpack too, right. I don't thinking if you have
two at the same time. I have both on hand
and you still have your to We're never doing two

(03:38):
at the time, Are you kidding me? That's why I
have you. I mean, it's true, that's why we had
children together. You can do it without you, all right, guys,
let's take a little break and we come back. We're
going to have Mark a Caldron from Coloring about our
first coloring bad. I know it'd be interesting because you know,
the these guys they're they're disbanded, right, I mean he's
still performing, but um, you know they've had a lot
of drama in their group. Yeah, I wonder if you'll

(04:01):
talk about that. I don't know. We're gonna find out.
I'm gonna ask the question. I'll see if he answers it,
all right, we'll be right back, all right. So Mark

(04:22):
Calderand is one of the singers of the famous nineteen
eighties contemporary R and B group Cody Bad. He was
a second tenor. All members of Coming Me Bad were
high school friends and brought up in Oklahoma City. Mark
worked with Stevie Brock for the song all for Love.
The song was a huge hit on the Disney charts especially,
and he has also played songs for TV series House

(04:42):
and night Rider. To My favorite shows, Mark Calderon, Welcome
to the show, my man, Thank you, Lanz, thanks for
having me guys. Oh my gosh. I was going through
a deep dive of all my favorite songs of you
guys yesterday, and man, it brought me back, brought me back.
I adore me a more. I mean that spoke to
me so much. I mean I think I was in

(05:04):
six or seventh grade, and it was kind of the
first time as a little kid from Mississippi heard R
and B. Like it was the first kind of R
and B that I was like exposed to. Yeah, I mean,
what about you, you were like three. Yeah, So let's
take us back. You make me sound old. You know,

(05:28):
we're all old. You can no, We're aged like a
fine wine. We were a fine wine. So Mark, take
us back to the very beginning. How did music and
performing first come into your life. Well, it actually started
out with my dad, you know, um back back then.
Whenever we would have like family gatherings and such, we

(05:48):
would he would always make us do a talent show
in front of the family or friends. And I started
out singing with my brother and my sister and my
dad would make a sing in Spanish. So it's kind
of how it all starred with music and me. And
then I had an older sister who loved like the
classic rock music like Peter Brantam and you know, the BGS.

(06:09):
And I just heard that style of music, you know,
all throughout the house every day, especially in the summer,
and I don't know, man, it just kind of got
into me and hight see it was an eighty three
or eighty four. I think I went to go see
the victory tour of Michael Jackson and that just blew
me away completely. So from there, you know, I just

(06:33):
wanted to be a singer. And you know, one time
I was in line at Long John Silver's and I
was singing. I was a kid and I was singing,
and this old man behind me he tapped my bag,
he said, tapped my shoulder. He said, hey, you sound
pretty good as a singer. And that right there, that
little comment made everything to me, get me surprised. The

(06:58):
little things that you say to people that really, you know,
that'll keep them. You know, it's something that's very memorable. Yeah,
and that man, I don't know who he was, but
that inspired me to continue on and uh, you know,
just get better at singing. And one thing led to
the next, you know. I mean, you know that's kind

(07:19):
of really how how it all got started. That is true.
I mean think about you know, you get those little
nuggets as a kid to give you that confidence. Ye see,
I was the opposite. No one ever told me I
sounded good, so it never gave me confident. Well it was,
but I went anyway it's true, or like if you tried,
like it could have been gone the other way, like
you were singing and like even as a joke, someone

(07:39):
could have laughed, or like which made you, yeah, don't
quit your days up this for fun and like that
one comment good time make you just never want to
sing again, even though you think you're good at Yeah,
it'll scar you. Yeah, yeah, to be careful what you
say to kids over there. It sticks, It really does stick.
So you met your future Code Me Bad band mates
in high school. You were all inquired together. But what

(08:00):
drew the four of you together and no one else
in the class. Well, what happened was it started basically
out with Brian. Brian and I mine introduced me to him.
And you know, back in the day, you know, there
was a lot of breakdancing, you know, kind of battles
that you would have and break dancing. Well, we kind

(08:20):
of was gonna start a little vocal battle, I guess,
you know, right there in the hallways in high school.
And I met him, and you know, I was like, hey,
you know, I want to hear you sing, you know,
and he goes, well, yeah, I can sing a little bit.
And I started to sing first, and then whenever he
started singing, man, it just like, oh my gosh, it

(08:40):
just like blew me away completely. His voice was just amazing,
and instead of us singing against each other, I was like, hey, man,
we need to sing together. You know, the heck with this,
you know. So that's kind of where it all started.
And he introduced me to Kevin. I eventually introduced him
and Kevin to Sam, but Sam was my best friend
at the time, and there was this Levi's five or

(09:02):
one Blues commercial. I don't know if you guys remember
back in the eighties where it was like four guys
singing in New York City on a street corner harmony.
And we kind of learned that that little that commercial skit.
Sang it for the high school Talent show and the
girls went bananas and we were like, Okay, this is
what we want to do in life. This is my future.

(09:26):
Now where did y'all go to high school? Northwest classen
in Oklahoma City? Oklahoma City. Okay, you still got that
accent too. Now, my southern accent is gonna come out
just this. It just did as you said, my Southern
accents true. Oh my god. So okay, calling me bad.
I've always want to know where does the name come from?

(09:46):
It actually came from a racehorse. We were looking for
a name and we come up with, you know, dozens
of different ideas and nothing was really sticking. And we
were like, we need something that's gonna stick man like Aerosmith,
Like what the heck is the arrowsmith? You know what
I mean? I mean something really like and so um uh.

(10:10):
Sam was actually looking through um the newspaper, the sports
section where all the different racehorses were, and you know,
racehorses have these funky names, you know, sometimes they're really cool.
So he was kind of going through them and he
was like, hey man, how about this name calling me bad?
I was like, oh, I was like, that's interesting, all right,

(10:31):
say that, say that, you know, let's see what what what? What?
You know? We'll just hold that. So our manager, Miles
Sanders in New York City, we were trying to come
up with different names. We didn't know what we were
gonna go with, so we picked three different names. Calling
me bad was one of them. He went uptown to
this DJ in New York and he he told them

(10:55):
the situation. He asked them, what was going to be
the best name for the group, and he's like telling
me bad. So that's what we went with. Aways assumed.
I alwayssumed you were like in high school and you
are a little too innocent, and you wanted, you know,
your fans to think that you're a little more bad,
So like cutting me bad. Yeah, the town bad. You're

(11:16):
the right sort of guys. Now, whose idea was it
to form the band? Well, you know, it's kind of
you know, like I was in a group with my
brother and sister, and you know, when brothers and sisters
get together, you know, sometimes it can get a little
you know, arguments go left and right, and you know

(11:39):
we're a little we're young, and one one one of
us want to rehearse, the other one doesn't. So I
was like, okay, the heck with this. But I was
I always, you know, I always kind of was in
the group thing. And Brian and I we kind of
started it, you know, from there, and that's kind of
really how it happened. Yeah, Well, when we love we
love New Edition. We loved those old groups, you know

(12:00):
like that, and they inspired us and yeah, you know,
well you know with that inspiration, I mean, did you
did you know exactly what type or group you wanted
to be. Did you want to model yourself after a
new addition, Yeah, a new addition. And you know, we
saw what new kids on the block were doing, and
those guys were really doing a lot of great things,
and um, you know, that was kind of our thing,

(12:21):
our vocals, and we knew we sounded really well and
people loved it. The girls at the school loved it.
You know. We used to go sing in the bathrooms
at our high school and the girls would just rush
in whenever they would hear singing, and we'd get in
trouble sometimes, but I mean, we just knew that we
had something special and we wanted to take it to
the next level. So what we did was, you know,

(12:46):
being in Oklahoma City, where the music business is not, um,
we used to wait for the big acts that used
to come through town and we would try to get
their attention and sing for them and maybe there's somebody
that would just give us a break, you know. And
believe it or not, it was really bon Jovi, um
who we who we met at the movie theater, you

(13:08):
know here in Oklahoma City. We caught him in the
band coming out of the movie theater. We sang for
them and they loved what they heard and they were like,
this is now. This is the Slippery when Wet tour.
So this was like a big tour and he was like, man,
you guys sound really good. John was like, how about
you guys open up for us tomorrow night in front

(13:29):
of twenty thousand people. Well, I guess you could imagine
because you did it, but that is insane. Yeah. So
we're like, we're like sophomores in high school, you know,
getting ready to open up with bon Jovi. Okay, so
that was amazing and at that point you could get
any girl you wanted. Yeah, well we did get dates

(13:52):
the following with Yeah, that worked out for us. Do
you think do you think that he knows this story?
Like later on, does he remember you guys after all
became so huge and he's like, yeah, I gave your
break kids. Yeah, well, you know, you know, he wanted
to give us that break, but I don't know, something

(14:13):
just didn't happen. So it was actually cool in the
gang who really got us to break? Oh yeah, yeah,
so they're the ones that kind of really helped us out,
and um, you know, of course they eventually had us
all go to New York City and we lived there
in a one bedroom apartment. There's like six of us living.
It's crazy, but we eventually, you know, after being turned

(14:37):
down by every record label in New York, Giant Records,
Warner Brothers, they ended up giving us a break. And man,
that's kind of where it all started. Yeah, because you
you moved to New York to pursue that record contract,
bump into Tony Tony, Tony who got you into the
ASCAP Music Awards. Yeah, where you see the producers, Jimmy
Jam Terry Lewis. I love these random and personal day

(15:00):
I know. So what what would y'all sing in these
random auditions? Well, that particular time, you know, Tony Tony Tony,
they were one of the acts that came through Oklahoma
City that we had met and sang for, you know,
and they remembered us. So they were headed to the
ass CAP Awards and they were like guys just walking
with us, you know, and that's what we did. And

(15:22):
sure enough, that's whenever we saw Jimmy jam and Terry Lewis,
and we didn't hesitate. We went right up to those
guys and started singing and they liked what they heard.
We were hoping that they were going to be you know,
the ones that you know work with us, and they
were that night. They said, you guys sound really good,
but you guys need to go back and write a

(15:43):
song in English and in Spanish. Oh that's right. I
just love all the support you had from other artists,
Like I could never imagine the Backstery boys running into
us as we're singing all the sheep, like, hey, guys,
come into the be amazed with us for to help
you out. I just never would have happened. No, No,

(16:05):
it's beautiful. So this, yeah, I adore me a more.
I mean, just one of my favorite songs. Uh, it's
the song that got you signed. Now, what do you
remember from writing that song? Did you think that that
song was going to be ultimately what was gonna get
your foot in the door? You know, we liked it
a lot, and we had no idea that it was

(16:26):
going to do what it did. Um. We knew it
had something, um, but being we wrote it in Oklahoma
City with Halm's a Lee who was the guy who
produced it for us, and we just kind of went
in there just doing our thing. Man, I don't know.
It's just you know, you can write a hundred songs
and just just all you need is just that one,

(16:46):
you know, that that that makes sense, that catches everything.
You know, the stars lined up, the chemistry is just there,
the vocals right, the lyrics are right, the music's right.
So it was just one of them things you know,
that just happened, and so you know it was a blessing.
It's true blessing for us. Yeah, and from there you
go with, uh, well want to set you up? Uh?
It comes to you. You you write and work on

(17:08):
the song for the New Jack City soundtrack, but it
ultimately becomes your debut single, which is a major bop
with some very sensual lyrics. Was there any talker surrounding
the fact, uh, prior to its release. Yeah, because it
was hard to tell my grandmother. Yeah, our first thing.

(17:29):
It was gonna be okay, how are you going to
tell your grandma? Yeah, our new songs and be called
I'm gonna sex you up, Grandma. Yeah, you're gonna love it.
It doesn't work, guys, So we were like, it's called
TikTok grandma or your mother or any any of your
family members. You know, so that was the only tough
part about it. But you know, I was actually the

(17:52):
first one to hear the song, you know, through some headphones,
and I knew that it was it. I knew that
that was the song for us. Um Gary Harris, he
was an A and R guy there. He was working
on the New Jack City soundtrack with Cassandra Mills, and
he had brought doctor Freeze down to Oklahoma City and
Freeze had played the track for us, and you know,

(18:15):
we only had headphones at that time, you know, to
listen to the song, and I was like, okay, this
is it, guys, and everyone else heard the record and
everyone knew it. The thing was, it was I Want
to Sex You Up now coming from Oklahoma the Bible Bell. Okay,
we didn't know how that was gonna fly, but you know,
we went ahead and went for it. And sometimes you
just got to take chances, you know, and you know,

(18:37):
and at this time, yeah, everything was a lot more innocent,
especially in music. Uh, you know, you're always looking out
for the fans and wanted to make it as family
friendly as possible. I mean, if you know, I Want
to Sex You Up came out today, it would definitely
be thought of as PG, just like, oh, that's nothing,
nothing at all. Did you feel the responsibility to keeping

(18:58):
it more family friendly? Well, it's funny that you say that,
because I remember the record label trying to you know,
they loved the song, the track, the lyrics, accept the
sex part, so they were trying to like, what can
we do to give it like a cleaner version? And
I remember that someone came up with I want to
love you up, I want to flex you up. I

(19:24):
don't know, I don't know, let's just keep it sex. Yeah,
but they were like, but we won't get everyone to
play the record because no one's gonna at the radio
station won't play the word sex. And you know what,
that wasn't the case, man. I mean when that record
came out, you know, people saw it from the movie
New Jack City. They saw it and they went those

(19:46):
were the day where you could actually call the radio
stations and request song, you know what I mean, which
those were the great days. So that's what happened. You know,
everyone just requested it. That's that's how it took off. Well,
clearly it worked because it led to Mini Grammy nominations
all these years later. How do you feel about that song. Great, Yeah, yeah,

(20:09):
I hope you do. You know, you know, I we
had a lot of fun with that song, you know,
back in the day. But um, you know, you know
I still go out and performance color me bad even
though the group isn't isn't you know, the original guys, Sam,
Brian and Kevin they're they're no longer with me, And um,

(20:32):
so last night we just did a show in Edmonton, Canada,
and which you know, you know, when you sing that song, man,
everybody loves it. Man. Everyone just dances, sings it out.
Everyone's having a great time. You know. It just takes
people back to the to what we call the good
old days, you know. So it's great, man. How did

(20:52):
y'all decide to in the group? Um? Well, you know
what we were We were getting ready to go into
a management deal, okay with someone you know really well
right joy right, yes, oh yeah, and um we were
getting ready to go sign a contract with him. And

(21:16):
you know, it's just weird how things just happened, because
you know, Kevin came over to my house. This was
the time when I was living in Dallas, and he
basically said that, you know, a preacher told him not
to sign the contract. You know, he was at church
that night and and then okay, and you know, then

(21:37):
we had to go back and tell Johnny, right, Hey,
Johnny wasn't happy. But the next day Sam called up
and said, you know, he was no longer in the group,
you know, and uh so that left Brian and I.
And during that time, you know, uh, Brian was having

(21:58):
a lot of problems, you know, with alcohol. So you know,
no one, none of the other guys, I really believe,
you know, none of the other guys wanted to go
there with it. So um, you know, um, one thing
led to the next, and um, you know, uh, it
just kind of I never quit the group, honestly, I've
always I never said, you know, I'm out, you know, so, um,

(22:21):
but um, you know that's really kind of how it happened. Yeah,
And do you speak to the other guys you're all
still friendly? No, No, unfortunately. Yeah, So no future reunion
with all the guys. It's just that's never gonna happen,
you know. It's it's like this, man, Um, you know,

(22:41):
those were like those guys were my heart soul, you know,
back in the day, my heart and soul and whenever
guys start you're when you're when your heart and soul
starts throwing you know, lawsuits out at you that cost
a lot of money, and like, really, I don't know, man,
it's just yeah, wells say yeah, I mean because obviously

(23:03):
it felt like family to you. And when you go
through something like family was it was family, you know
it was. And whenever people start doing that, how can
you make how can you make that work? Again? Yeah?
That's it. It's like your moms suing you. I know,
It's like, how do you get past that? How do
you work after that? Yeah? Well, let's talk about something
more positive. We got to talk about it. Yeah, yeah,

(23:23):
but I do want to say I hope the best
for all. But we have to talk about the coomy
bad suits. Okay, you were known for your style. The coordinated,
colorful suits were so fly, especially to you know, this
guy over here in junior high. Um, so how did
y'all come up with the group's look back then? It
was that a Is that a big? Is that something

(23:45):
you wanted to stand out? Yeah? Well you know, uh,
Lionel Martin was the director for I Want to Sex
You Up? And he had this stylist named Robin. I
forgot what her name was, Robin. I forgot what her
name was. I never her first name was Robin. But
she was the one that put us in those colorful

(24:05):
suits and then we kind of we had that look
for the video that everyone loved. You know, of course,
the name color Me Bad and then colorful suits and
then nineties and all that kind of worked together. And
uh and then my ex wife, Lisa, she she was

(24:26):
our stylist and she kind of took it from there
and styled us on our videos, on our tours and
such like that. I think, you know, all the rest
of the stuff that we did, and we know, we
kind of kept that same vibe and we'd love the
European look, we'd love the GQ look. I remember we
were at Santa I was at Santa Monica Pier one time,

(24:49):
walking around in T shirts and shorts, and you know,
we were in a crowd and I remember some girl said, hey,
she pointed at and she goes to her boyfriend, Hey,
that's the guy from calling me bat. And the guy
looked at me and he was like, Na, that's not him, No,
coming me Bad. Dress is way better than that. So

(25:13):
I'm like Okay, you know I remember hearing that. You
know you got it nah coming me bad so. But
but you know that was we love that whole clean style,
you know, European thing going, you know. So that was
our thing. Yeah. Well, alongside Boys to Men all for one,
and you know other groups Commy Bad led the resurgence

(25:35):
of the post doo wop harmony groups and you and
you guys invented the term hip hop doo wop. Now
did that ever add extra pressure to you when making
new music? Uh? No, No, I mean you know, there
was no pressure at all. You know, it was just
our style is just how we sang. Man, it was
just what we did. You know. We would get with
the hip hop producer like you know Doctor Freeze or

(25:58):
or how he Hitman's hit Man, how we'd see would
get with him or and other guys like a DJ
Poo and they would just bring the hip hop beats
and then we would just write songs over them. You know,
it's you know, that's what we did. And we kept
the harmonies there and the soulful vocals, and the hardest
part was was just coming up with that that that

(26:19):
that hook, that that would stick with people. So you know,
but sometimes we would come. Sometimes you know, it wouldn't come. Yeah, um,
all right, so, uh one of our favorite peanuts on
the show is giggles here, who's gonna be joining us? Um?
She really really wanted to talk to you about her
favorite thing you've ever done in your career. All right,

(26:42):
so giggles Hi, I'm giggles Hi. Um. You guys were
one of my very favorite bands. The CMB album, well,
the the CD um, I totally wore out. I loved
it so much. Um. And I want to know what
was it like on being being on nine two one

(27:03):
at like the height of you guys, in the height
of the show. Yeah, yeah, yeah, no, that was you know,
we were big fans of the show already. UM. And
I remember we we uh, they wanted us to come
fly in. We were We did a show in Toronto, Canada,
and we picked up plane straight to La to go
and do that episode. And I remember meeting everybody for

(27:27):
the first time, and gosh, they were just all so nice.
You know, I love the nicest I mean, uh, they
were all great people, and it was it was so
much funny. It was something new for us to do
a little acting. You know, and I think we did. Okay.
You know What's what's crazy about that was when that

(27:48):
episode aired, it had the most views that they've ever
had on nine two one zero. And the very next
day we sold our kid, you not, we sold a
million CDs. Oh my gosh, it was that very next day.
So that really just you know, shot our career. It
was episode right, No, No, it was. Uh. So they

(28:10):
had a concert in Donna Martin. Tory Spelling's character was
a huge fan, and so they snuck into their hotel
and she caught her mom having an affair at the hotel.
So it was a big thing. And then Jenny Garth,
who played Kelly Taylor, snuck up to their hotel room
and like hung out with them, and then they they
did I Adore Me a More a cappella at the

(28:31):
peach Pit. Yeah, they did, sitting down they were like
sitting in chairs, like very cool. Nice. Yeah, she's a
huge fan. I loved it. Did you did you ever
run into like Tory Spelling or anyone after that? Have y'all? Uh,
Brian Austin Green, we would we would run and you

(28:54):
know what I I've talked in that Donna interview with
Jenny Garth and Spelling, you know, and they're wonderful girls.
They were in lovely. We just saw Brian it was
his fiftieth birthday, I think last week, and we're just
having to be saying the same hotel as him. Uh.
And then Tory I've seen a lot lately, you know,
because she's now getting divorced, so you know she's now

(29:14):
coming out of you know, being in that. Oh and
then we met Jenny. She's just all lovely people, lovely
lovely people. Yeah, maybe, yeah, anything else you would like
to know. I mean, I just wanted to know what
that was like. And I you know what song was
my favorite one on that CMB album, The Color Me
Bad One? It was the very last track with the rap. Yes,

(29:38):
that was great. They were all great songs. Yeah, yeah,
I'm gonna have to listen to that on the way home.
It was so good. Big fan, congrats on all your
success and yeah, great, great meeting you. Thanks Giggling. Of
course I know she was. She was real excited you
were coming up. Really to be able to talk about

(29:59):
Color Me Bad and nine h two one in one
show is like that's her dream, That is her wet dream, right,
there making dreams happen and making dreams happen across the tips.
So after you ended with the group, what did life
look like for you after the band? Where did you
Where did you want to take your career? Did you
want to take a break? Did you want to start
a family? I started a family. I got married, started

(30:22):
a family. Two beautiful, beautiful children. Of course they're grown up.
My daughter, she graduated from Vanderbilt. She's a nurse practitioner.
My son graduate. My son that he's out there in
La now. He graduated from m YU and he's doing great,
and I'm so proud of, so proud of both of them.
Did either of them want to go into music and

(30:43):
follow your footsteps? Because we have two year olds right now,
and I'm just like, do I encourage them just be
in this business or do I like make them very
scared of this business? Yeah? You know, you know, you
just kind of have to let them see what they
kind of fall into, you know, and then and then
support them whatever they do. You know, what if whatever,

(31:03):
if it's sports, or if it's music or science, or
you know, you just support them whatever God the plan
that God has for them, You just support them. Because
they're gonna fall into it, you know. That's the way
I see it. Yeah exactly. It's like you fell into it,
just like me, and just like you know, just like
y'all fell into That's my whole life. Just think you

(31:24):
do You just thing just fall in your lap and
you just go with it. You know, you can't really,
you can't plan for anything. It just happens. It happened.
Uh So in uh twenty ten, you and the guys
reunited on and offer some performances and other projects. Where
did the initial ideas start, uh with working together again? Uh?

(31:44):
You know what? We just saw big search in that
you know, boy band thing happening, you know, with a
new kids on the block and again or yeah, yeah,
everyone started to get back and started singing. It was like,
you know, this was back in twenty ten. Brian and
I we actually, um, we gotta. He called me, he said, hey,

(32:07):
you want to you want to go do a show
in Hawaii? And I was like, yeah, you know, I'll
go do a show in Hawaii, which you know, and
we went there and you know, the crowd was amazing,
you know, is a great turnout. And after that, you know,
we were like Okay, so what do we do now,
you know, and we didn't have any other shows lined up.

(32:28):
We called up an agent. He was like, why don't
you try to get some of the other guys, you know,
one of the other guys to come and sing with
you guys. So we we got Kevin. Eventually he came
back into the group and it just we were kind
of moving smoothly there for a second, and then everything
you know, kind of went, you know, left, And when

(32:50):
you're dealing with someone, like you said, you know, Brian
was dealing the addiction. H Brian did a show with
my bandmate Chris koph Patrick and you know, also in
the height of his addiction, there was an incident in
twenty eighteen on stage where Brian pushes you and I
know that that just I mean personally and professionally, that
must have just shocked you so much. So and you know,

(33:11):
and we don't mean we have friends that are dealing
with the dicks right now. So it is so it's hard,
like it's really hard on everyone around your friends family.
So where does your relationship stand with Brian today? You know,
I don't I don't talk to him, you know, um
is he has he gotten help or is he still
you know, I don't know, Honestly, I don't know. I

(33:31):
went on the Doctor Field Show just to support the
situation for him, hoping that, you know, that would help.
I did that, and I don't know, I kind of so,
So what happened was during that time when it was
just Brian and I doing shows. Um, you know, he
would show up to the shows just wasted, just gone,

(33:53):
and then he would try to get up and start singing,
and it it just it wasn't right, you know. And
then sometimes he would walk off stage and I would Okay,
I have to ask myself this, Okay, do I walk
off with him, not get paid and probably get sued,
or do I just stay on stage, take the mic,

(34:14):
sing the leads and try to finish out the show
the best I can. And that was the choice I did,
and that happened multiple times. So you know, when does
it end? Well, I'll tell you when it ends. When
I got assaulted on stage, that's when it ended. And
I said I have enough of this and enough is enough.

(34:35):
So that's that's kind of where where everything went after that,
you know, And and they always say, you know, they're
not going to get help unless they're ready to get help.
And I mean, I don't know if y'all ever tried
to do an intervention with him or like trying to
get I mean, people that just don't want help will
not receive help. Well, this has been an issue too,

(34:57):
that's been going for a long time, you know. And
you can't. I mean, you know, they've got to help themselves.
You know, it starts with them first, you know, because
you and you can't and you can't waste your time,
your life. Yes, exactly, you can't do it. Man. You
you got your own life to live, so you be responsible. Remember,

(35:20):
I have I had kids at the time, I had
a family that I was taken care of, and I
was relying, you know, on on that to to pay
my bills, to to take care of the family and such.
So it's really tricky. You gotta make some decisions and
sometimes you gotta make hard decisions. Yeah. Yeah, well, h
Color Me Bad will forever be an iconic group legends.

(35:41):
What are you most proud of looking back at your career? Yeah,
you know that first album, you know, we we we
just kind of went on a limb and we were
just going with our hearts. And we put everything into that, man,
and we were all on the same page. We got
in the studio just writing songs, songs, and you know,

(36:01):
it just seemed to all come together at that time.
And that's what did it. Man. Today this year, I'm
doing sixty shows from songs that we wrote, you know,
back when a nineteen twenty years old, you know, and
they're still they still stick and they're still around. So
I'm so thankful for that, you know, um, you know,

(36:24):
and and we have so much fun, so much fun
on stage doing it so well during that first album.
And I mean your kids, you're going to the Grammys
and all these things and you're, you know, rubbing elbows
with musicians you probably idolized. Do you have any just
amazing fun stories that you just like, this is one
of the best days of my life. Yes, I do. Actually,

(36:46):
growing up, I love playing basketball and I used to
pretend in my backyard that I was Magic Johnson. And
so you actually got to meet Magic Johnson one time
and it just made my day, man, you know, So
that was that was amazing. And then another time we
James Brown invited us to his birthday party and we

(37:09):
got to sing for him. Party, so things like that. Man,
is there anyone you wish you would have collaborated with? Uh,
Michael Jackson? Yeah, you guys, we did a couple of
cloud Yeah, it was great. I mean that's that's also
a little you know, peach me moment of like are

(37:30):
we really like first off, just in the same room
with Michael, but like we're doing music with Michael. Oh
you wants to perform with us? What is going on
right now? That that's pretty I should be interviewing you, right, Yeah,
we both lived some lives, that's for sure. Yeah. Um,
do you think Coloary Bad was ever considered I mean,

(37:50):
you know, in the early nineties there was no term
boy band. Um, so do you think Coloory Bad is
considered upwoy band? And what do you think of that term?
We we never looked at ourselves as a boy band.
We were just always a vocal group, you know, just
to that's you know, Um, the boy bands came you know,

(38:11):
I guess that term came around when you guys it
was a German thing. We lived in Germany. Everyone was
boy bands, Like what is this bad? Right? Yeah? Yeah?
Because of take that and was that I'll tell you what, man,
I want to say this just because I'm talking to
you now. You guys were awesome. I mean, you guys,

(38:34):
you guys had us on our heels. Man. I remember,
this is a true story. We did a show with
them and they opened up for us, and I swear
to you, two months later we were opened up for
them because they were so good. I mean, they just
you guys just took off like a rocket. And Johnny Wright,
he just knew what he was doing. He knew how
to manage that whole thing. But it was right at

(38:57):
that time, you know, it was this explosion and I think,
you know, the Spice Girls, Handsen like whoever helped open
that door. And then we were just there at the
right time. But what I liked about you guys y'all dancing,
y'all choreography yea, so great, you know, and uh, I
mean y'all are the best. I have to say, you

(39:18):
guys be careful saying that on this show. You're gonna
get a lot of fans the truth. Think that means agree.
I mean, especially coming from uh, member of the most
iconic like what inspired us? You know, I mean, you
guys are what you would boys to men. A new addition,
that's what made in sync. Like, there would be no

(39:39):
in Zync without you guys at all, Like no one
would have even looked at us. So I have to
thank you for putting me in this chair right now.

(40:02):
All right, let's get some frosted tips here. All these
years later, you're still touring. What tips do you have
for people to never giving up in your dreams and
proving you can still do what you're passionate about at
any point in your life. Oh man, you know that's
that's you know, that's a that's a serious question because
it all depends on how serious you are about what

(40:23):
you want to do. You know. You know this man,
I mean, you know how hard it was to make it.
You put your heart into that, you know, and you
just every day you got to eat, sleep, drink whatever
you're wanting. You know, that's just the truth. And that
you're in the United States of America. You can do
anything here. You've got that opportunity, you know, so take advantage,

(40:46):
you know. I mean, you know music is tough, harder
today to get into now. It's tough, man, you know,
there's just I mean, how do you get your stuff
out there unless you got a big machine behind you.
There's so many platforms. Every fan group is so segmented
right now, so it's hard to stand out, like it

(41:07):
really is. It really is, Yeah, it really is. At
least you can get to that little fan group of yours,
But if you want to be you know, mainstream, it
is almost impossible these days. It really is. Man. I
I see how it could help a lot of artists
that would have never got their shot, like the guy
and I don't know, North Dakota or you know what

(41:27):
I mean, or Panna. But at the same time, man,
you know, I kind of missed the old way of
how the business ran. You know, you worked harder. I
mean it was a harder job. Yeah, And the record labels.
The record labels was really into building their artist, artist development.
They don't do that anymore at all. It's like you
have to come to the label with a full, complete

(41:49):
album before they're like, okay, we'll take that and be
your pr behind it. Yeah, and a million followers you
gotta have, yeah, yeah, exactly. All right, let's get to
some fan questions. The first one we talked about history
and Legos wants to know what was it like being
on the nine O two one. Oh we covered that
with the Giggles. All right, Uh this is from Emma
ed At sixteen. Have you ever seen the Glee cover

(42:11):
of I Want to Sect You Up? And what do
you think of it? The gleek? Oh? Yeah, I loved it.
I love their version of it. You know, they did
a great job. Man, I was. I was so happy
they did that. I know, I was like, hey, guys,
good job. I know every artist, like you know, Glee
was taken off. It was huge, and every artists like,
are they gonna do my song? Are they gonna do
my song? And then they finally we're gonna do an

(42:31):
in sync song we approved by by by. I'm like, yes,
they're finally going to do it. And then it was
just like a very kind of throwaway part in the sale.
I'm like, no, well, at least you made it. Yeah,
we got a little one on there, you know. Um.
All right, man, before we let you go, we always
have to ask what you're binging right now? What do
we need to watch on television? What songs do we
need to know about? What songs do I listen to? Yeah?

(42:55):
What do you listen to? Anything? You're listening to? You now? Um, gosh, man,
I'm really old school. Guys. I listened to Marvin Gay. Uh,
you know that's what I listened to sometimes when I'm jogging.
I love a Steely Dan. Oh that's a bad word
to use around us. Oh my goodness, stole all of

(43:19):
our Grammys one year. Okay, really, no, I love but
we do blame them for not for getting our Grammy.
I know they finally do a comeback twenty years later
on the year that we were supposed to get our Grammy. Um,
and yeah, they took it from us. But you know,
thank you, but no continue Steely Dan. Go ahead. Oh

(43:41):
my bad. You know you know our Grammy? Uh it
was walking in Memphis, that's what ye Oh no, yeah,
it was either Steely Dan or UM soundtrack. Guys. I mean,
oh my gosh, why can I think Phil Collins. It's
always Phil Collins or Steely Dan that just would snatch
that gold trophy out of our hand. But I love

(44:04):
them anyway. I love them anyway. I just made us
or do you watch TV? Do you have anything you're
binging right now? Um? Ted Lasso, Oh yeah, we still
have to I know we have to love. Yeah, I know,
I love we're big Wednesday fans over here. Oh yeah, yeah,

(44:24):
oh yeah, that's coming back, I guess. So, yeah, a
lot of stuff coming back. Well, we don't know because
now with the SAG strike and the writers strike, everything's
on hold. So I don't know when we're gonna get
to see these season twos of shows that we love
so much. That is sad. What do you think of
Are you a SAG member? Are you being affected by
the strike. Yeah, yeah, I'm not right now, I'm not

(44:46):
being affected by it, but yeah, yeah, I am a
SAG member. And you know, gosh, I hope they they
can work that out for it just for people man
to make a living. My gosh, y, you know that
they've got they've got to share that a little bit better.
And that's anybody. There's so much money, man, it can
they got to spread around exactly. But wealth distribution is

(45:06):
so horrible. And that's it's in every category of business.
It's not just entertainment. It's everyone. The top one percent
get everything, and nothing trickles down to the other ninety
nine percent, And especially in our business, it is so
sad to know that eighty seven percent of our SAG
members can't even meet the twenty six thousand dollars a
year to get insurance. Imagine, eighty seven percent of a

(45:30):
whole business cannot even afford insurance. There's something wrong with that.
So that's what's trying to be Yeah, all right, Well
on that fun sad note. Yeah, it was so great
to get to know you and see you again. We
are so proud of everything that you've done. Again, You've
been such an inspiration to meet personally and our group

(45:51):
and uh and I can't thank you enough for for
giving us that inspiration because it made us you know
who we are today. I love you guys man, Thank
you so much have me on this show. I was
so excited to be on this program. So thank you
guys again, much love. And I hope that we get
to see you, you know, whenever I come out to
La we gotta connect. Yeah, I would love that. I'll
take it to roccos y. What's your apt name? So

(46:14):
everyone can follow you? You can contact me at color
me Bad Music on Instagram, yeah, and then on Facebook
it's just calling me bad, you know, and uh, and
you can always you can always contact me on the
website calling me bad dot com. Okay, and for the
young people listening right now. Bad is with two ds

(46:35):
two d's. It's extra bad, just like race, just like
the race horse. All right, Mark, thank you so much
for being on Frostitist. We'll check in with you later.
Thank you, guys, blessing. All right, thank you, Yeah, bye bye,
Mark calder On. Everyone, what a nice We say this
with every guest with every day. I know, like we're

(46:57):
expecting every guest to be like monsters. Apparently, I guess
to be to be in a boy group, you have
to have a good person. There's the bad boy. Everybody
is so nice, yea, even the bad boys turn nice. Yeah,
we show. I guess I can interview next week. Maybe

(47:17):
you need to create your own boy band character like
you do bluef and all these other voices, and you
need to come in as like the asshole boy band member. Yeah,
I will name myself Lance Bass. Oh Lance ass. Why
don't I just interview you? Okay, Okay, it was mean.
He's a sweetheart. We all know that. Wow, somehow I
just got to knock him down to a real negative,
real negative. Um. Yeah, but go follow Mark out there.

(47:38):
What a good dude, and man, that music, I'm telling
you it just brings me back junior high and like
where you first start. I mean that's where you're, you know,
coming of age, and you start thinking about where you people.
I was sexing them up in the junior high dances
with a balloon in between us that you couldn't really
like touch. I was baby Jesus, Baby Jesus in the middle. Yeah.

(48:00):
But yes, I guarantee you that our school did not
play I want to sex you up. Oh, there's no way.
Your school. We were more like more than words type ballads.
But I sure had friends that had the CD because
I'm sure my mom wouldn't let me have the CD
either because it says sex in it. But my friends
had it. I know. Really we're a bad boy. All right, guys,

(48:23):
that's all the show I have for you today. Thank
you so much for listening. Thank you so much, Turkey.
My pleasure for being here, My pleasure to be here.
Yeah yeah, all right, be good to each other, don't
drink and drive out there, take care of those animals,
and remember stay frosted. Hey, thanks for listening. Follow us
on Instagram at Frosted Tips with Lance and Michael Church

(48:46):
in art and at Lance Bass for all your pop
culture needs, and make sure to write us a review
and leave us five stars six if you can see
you next time,
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