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June 16, 2024 28 mins

Two-time Emmy and Three-time NAACP Image Award-winning television Executive Producer Rushion McDonald interviews Chef Jernard Wells. He hosts "New Soul Kitchen" & "New Soul Kitchen Remix" on CLEO TV and leaves an indelible mark on Food Network & Cooking Channel shows. Beyond his culinary achievements, his collaborations with luminaries like Tyler Perry and NBA All-Star Brandon Ingram have been celebrated on prestigious platforms, including "Today Show," "Good Morning America," PEOPLE, and ESSENCE. He's fondly known as "The Family Chef," his creations satisfy appetites and inspire positive family connections. It's Thanksgiving and Christmas time at the dinner table, and we will be talking about his cookbook, Southern Inspired: More Than 100 Delicious Dishes from My American Table to Yours.

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Episode Transcript

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Speaker 1 (00:05):
Welcome to Money Making Conversations.

Speaker 2 (00:06):
It's the show that she is the Secrets of Success
experience firsthand by Marketing and Brandon expert Rashan McDonald. I
will know he's giving me advice on many occasions. And
in case you didn't notice, I'm not broke. You know
he'll be interviewing celebrity CEOs, entrepreneurs and industry.

Speaker 1 (00:20):
Decision make because it's what he likes to do. It's
what he likes to share.

Speaker 2 (00:24):
Now it's time to hear from my man, Rashan McDonald
money Making Conversations.

Speaker 1 (00:28):
Here we go. This is Rashan McDonald. Thank you for
coming back and listening to the Money Making Conversation master Class.
My guest is on the phone is Chef Gerard Wells.
He hosts New Soul Kitchen and New Soul Kitchen Remix
on Cleo TV and leaves an indelible mark on shows
across Food Network and the Cooking Channel. And I'll be
trying to get on those shows just I just want

(00:49):
to be a judge. I can never do that show
the Worst cook that that's not me and I can't
and I don't have the skills. It's just mad. It
Rashan stop it beyond his cullinary achievements. His collaboration with
luminaries like Tyler Perry and NBA all Start brandon Ingram
have been celebrated on prestigious platforms, including Today's show Good
Morning America. People in essence just saw him this last

(01:12):
week on share A Shepherd Show. He finally knows he's
finally known as the family chef. His creations not only
satisfies appetites but also inspired positive family connections. It's Thanksgiving,
Thanksgiving and Christmas time at the dinner table. His cookbook
Southern Inspired more than one hundred delicious dishes from my
American table to yours is what we'll be talking about.
Please work with the money making conversation Master Class Chef

(01:35):
Gernard Wells. How you doing, sir?

Speaker 3 (01:38):
I am doing good, Chef.

Speaker 1 (01:43):
You know, you know every time I talk to you know,
you know, it's immediately go to food and we start smiling,
then laughing, and now I gotta start out this event
that you got me. I won't say hoodwink, but you
know you got me bacon. You know he called me
for a good cause. Tell us about this March of
Dance March of Dimes program that's coming up, and uh
and uh and the cause that it's benefiting, the.

Speaker 3 (02:07):
Marches Dimes, which is which I always say, is an
amazing cause as the best things. What they say, Rashon,
the best way to show people you actually care is
to actually care. But I would be headlining and hosting
the March of Dimes Gala event as a matter of fact,
next Thursday, November to sixteen, in Atlanta, Georgia at the Foundry,

(02:31):
and it's gonna be filled with all kinds of amazing food.
I'm doing a live cooking show. Not only would they
get a chance with Rashall to see and experience the
live cookie show in full ef fake, but they'll also
get a chance to experience the food. Yes, we're doing
We're doing some cool auctions for the people. Where where

(02:51):
where the chefs. I have an amazing, amazing team of
chefs that's coming at the showcase food from all over
the Atlanta, all over Atlanta. As a matter of fact,
to have an amazing, amazing that would be bringing dessert,
you have to you know who he is.

Speaker 1 (03:09):
Yes, he got me, Ladiesship. I'll be bringing six cakes,
six six I'll be bringing German chocolates.

Speaker 3 (03:17):
Jo, what with the cakes and look them cakes and
not joke. I had the opportunity to eat one of
your cakes. Well was that a few weeks ago? Oh?

Speaker 1 (03:26):
The butter pecan. The butter pecan.

Speaker 3 (03:30):
And as a matter of fact, it was vegan to be.

Speaker 1 (03:32):
Exactly, absolutely absolutely because my wife, you know, she's vegan
now and so I have to really it doesn't this
taste exactly. So in fact, I probably do a vegan
for the for the for the gala. But more importantly,
you know when you when you called me, I gotta
do it because of the fact that you rarely called
me to do anything for you. And this is the
cause it's going to generate. Uh, it's for a food pantry.

Speaker 3 (03:52):
Correct, yes, yes, for the food pantry as well as
this year the March of Dimes is head been of
those that are premature premature babies. If anyone that's ever
had had a premature child, maybe they've been premature every
or experience that. This is what this particular gala is
designed to help. And there are so many people. As

(04:13):
a matter of fact, one of one of my children
was the print me. So that's something that's near here.
So especially in the not only just in the community round,
definitely in the community. I always say where we plan
our roots and where we live, it's always that are

(04:34):
giving back in. So this is one of.

Speaker 1 (04:38):
You know, you have to know you're breaking up periodic?
Are you moving around? I know you're on your cell
phone because you're going, You're going in and out.

Speaker 3 (04:46):
What about now?

Speaker 1 (04:47):
You much better? Much better? I don't want to ruin
this conversation not acknowledging that we need to keep you
station there now. Thanksgiving and Christmas coming up, brother, you know,
and you know I always do a big spread at
the office. You've you've been there for the big spread,
you know, and you know do the two turkeys you have.
I'm getting old. I don't think I'm gonna do two turkeys.
I think I'm gonna I'm gonna do some fried chicken

(05:07):
this year with boy. I'm gonna spice it up different
fried chickens, some calf fish, some turkey, some ham. So
your book that you've done, the very popular book, it's
something inspired more than one hundred dishes from my American
table of yours. Where can they go in that book
to start planning their Thanksgiving meal?

Speaker 3 (05:29):
You know one of the things because as they say,
I live and I love the holidays, especially when it's
all revolved revolving around family and cooking.

Speaker 1 (05:40):
Right.

Speaker 3 (05:40):
But I have a complete holiday section. And it's great
that you said you were thinking about doing chickens versus turkeys.
A lot of people are getting away from the bigger birds.
And I have a fried cornish hen. That is amazing
when I when I tell you, and one of the
things with cornish hens, I said, a lot of people
asleep on them. You can brine, a marinate them just right.

(06:06):
You can batterle them, fry. And what I like doing
is taking those cornish hens. When you cut them in half,
you still got a little baby legs out the breast,
the whole nine and it goes a long way. But
at the same time, it's maintainable and easy to cook.
A lot of people want to cook great food, but
they want to have time for them selves and their
family as well. Well.

Speaker 1 (06:27):
You know, you know, you always get fancy. I was
just with fried chicken, you know, so then you gonna
come off cornish hens. And see, that's why we's why,
that's why we get along. We think so different. Now,
I have never cooked. I've eaten the cornish hen, but
your boy has never cooked a cornish hen. In fact,
I'll be honest with you, brother, I've been in every

(06:48):
grocery store in this country. I wouldn't know where to
go find the cornish hen.

Speaker 4 (06:53):
So help me.

Speaker 1 (06:54):
Where do you find the cornersh hens in the grocery store?

Speaker 3 (06:58):
Benji? You'll find a corner hens hanging out right by
the turkey, right beside the turkey. You gonna see them
little to them, little two birds in the pack, keeping
each other company, waiting on you. But now we're talking
about if we're gonna talk about fried chicken out, my brothers,
I have enough. I have a great sweet tea Brian
fried chicken recipe.

Speaker 1 (07:18):
There you go.

Speaker 3 (07:19):
There, they go three teen to that level that you
like it. Marinate that chicken in that sweet for hours,
then batter it, roasted, smoke it, what air fry, whatever
you want to do, and I guarantee the experience will
be like no other.

Speaker 1 (07:34):
Let me let me just let me you say something
right there because one of my employees. Because I got
a big old defry that I can do inside my office.
You know, I don't have to go outside worried about,
you know, it's feeling on nobody. I can just sit
it right on my countertop, you know, And I can defry.
I can defry anything I want. I can defry a
twenty pound turkey in that in that in this defry.

(07:58):
It's that big, it's plug in, easy to clean, and
all that stuff. And then my then by my good employee,
she said, you know, why don't you air fry once
you not the turkey, but just some other stuff I
was doing, because I was talking about doing some catfish,
you know. You know I was bragging at the time too.
I said, I'm gonna fry some calffish. She said, how
about your air fry. You got an air fry in

(08:18):
the basement. Okay, so you said the word air fry.
Please help me and educate me because I'm not an
air fried guy. How does that work? How does that
work when when you're talking about air frying versus I
can bake some chicken or some fish. I can fry
some chicken or some fish. But how does that air

(08:40):
frying exactly exactly work?

Speaker 3 (08:43):
Okay? One of the things of air fry, specially if
you want to go for that crispiness with the skin.
You want to rub your you want to rub whatever
protein that you that you're planning on frying, you want
to rub it down with a little olive oil. That
olive oil helps bring the moisture out and also helps
lock in their Christmas on the skin that we love,

(09:04):
expecially if you was air frying chicken would always say
when and when you're gonna air fried. And if you
want that chrispy batter, what you definitely want to do
is you want to do a light batter. You don't
want to do a heavy batter on it, as if
you were submerging it in grease. Because remember the whole
gist of the av fry is to remove the grease
components of the cholesterol side of it to make it

(09:26):
a little more healthier and lighter for us. So if
you're gonna go, if you want to go with a batter,
you want to do just that one light dredge or batter.
Then you want to spread, you want to spread with
your favorite cooking spray or like I said, pre rub
it down with like an olive oil and then pop
it in the air fron and let it go just
is if you were dropping it in grease. The only

(09:46):
difference there is no grease.

Speaker 1 (09:50):
Okay. So that sounds so simple AND's scary because it is.
So that's it.

Speaker 3 (10:01):
That's it. That's it. Because I air fry everything from
from chicken wings I did a few weeks ago. I
did some some jerk. I did some air fry jerk
lamb chops because I wanted that jerk season to get
nice and crispy, marinate them, season them up, dropped in
the air fry. The flavors were profound. Also, Collie Flowers,

(10:24):
you know. I even air fry Oprah. You know, the
air fry. You can do a lot of things. You
can do a lot of a lot of different just
about everything that you would do with submerged de greet
you can get that same expense from an air fry.

Speaker 1 (10:38):
Okay. So I'm so I gotta go try it because
I've never tried it in my life. Cool. Now, let's
move on to favorite Thanksgiving dinners for your items and
a favorite Christmas? Are they the same? Are people got
favorites they just want to do for Thanksgiving and then
favorites they just want to do. Because I'm gonna tell you,

(11:00):
sweet potato pie always rings true. For me at Thanksgiving,
it doesn't ring true for me at Christmas? Is that true?

Speaker 3 (11:08):
Correct? That is that is true? You know what happens
is we go so we temperate people go so hard
doing Thanksgiving and cook up all those all those dishes,
nostalgia dishes that they've been salivating over and thinking about
all year. By the time Christmas hit, they're burnt out
on the turkeys, They're burnt out on the on the

(11:31):
chicken on the hand. So we look to do something
different and one of our biggest trends. What I like
doing for the Christmas holiday I do more brunches. Now.
I have an amazing corn bread waffle that I make.
I make many corn bread waffles, and I take some
of their leftover turkey and I make me turkey and
corn bread waffles with the cranberry maple syrup to go over.

(11:56):
Those are things I do.

Speaker 1 (11:57):
I break that recipe down to art because I'm wanting
the corn bread waffles right now. What all goes into
the corn bread waffles? Chefs, you know it wells. You're
speaking one of the one of the top sales chefs
in the country. He's on all the popular shows, he
hosts a new Soul Kitchen and New Sold Kitchen remix.

(12:19):
If you download the Cleo TV app, you can see
him smiling and cooking all the time. So waffle corn.

Speaker 3 (12:25):
Bread, Yes, what you want is equal parts flour, equal
parts corn meal. Now the same way if you're making
a traditional waffle batter flour, corn meal, two eggs. Then
you want to fold in buttermilk or regular milk, depending
on how fluffy you want them, and then from there

(12:47):
that's your base for the waffle. Now it's time for
the flavor, depending on what you want your flavor, whether
you want to use vanilla ass strack, maple ass strack,
you may want to get real real eagle with it,
and find you use some pumpkin asstrack, coconut, whatever you want,
you fold that in. That's what that waff is gonna
taste like. But ultimately, because you're blended in the corn

(13:10):
meal with it, it's gonna give you that same corn
bread textures that if you're eating corn bread and stuff
is gonna be fluffy because the flour is gonna balance
it out jazz, right, but you have that nice, good
cristiness to it where it stands up purpoly and it's
really you know, as I always tell people, when you
go in the kitchen, when you start cooking it, getting

(13:32):
your meat some plots together to me, some plasa French
forgetting all your ingredients in order. If you lay everything
out in front of you ahead of time, that says
you know what you're gonna cook, and you're not gonna
miss a step. And then you don't have to leave
from the area as much where you work, and and
then you tend to pay attention to the food and
it turns out better. But more importantly, it cuts down

(13:53):
on your cook time.

Speaker 1 (13:54):
Right we're talking to chef you nod Well the whole
some new sold kitchen and new sold Kitchen remix on CLEOTV.
His book you Know Southern Inspired, more than one hundred
delicious dishes from my American Table to yours can be
bought on any of the favorite online bookstores Amazons stores
like that. We were right back with more Chef jar
Welles on Money Making Conversation Masterclass.

Speaker 4 (14:23):
We'll be right back with more Money Making Conversations Masterclass
with Rashaan McDonald. You are now tuned into the Money
Making Conversations Minute of Inspiration with Rashawn McDonald.

Speaker 1 (14:36):
On the court. Chris Paul is at forced to be
reckoned with off the court. He's a father, husband, compassionate, philanthropist,
and businessman. He makes a huge difference in this community
by supporting many organizations.

Speaker 5 (14:48):
There's so many people who have helped me get to
where I am today. That is paying it forward and
just trying to teach and educate, especially the youth. Not
only my own kids especially them, but everyone just trying
to teach them. And I'm still learning because what happens
also is a lot of times people see you on
television or they see you on that court and they
think that's all you know. They think all you know

(15:08):
is how to put the ball in the basket. That's
not the case, not only myself. There's a lot of
intelligentathletes out there, and I think that's why we have
to continue to learn. It's funny sometimes when you do
get in the business world and people shake your hand,
they make a comment and they like, oh, you know
about this.

Speaker 1 (15:22):
If you want to hear this full interview with Chris Paul,
visit Moneymakingconversation dot com.

Speaker 6 (15:28):
Keep Winning HBCUs represent Black Excellence. If you attend or
are an alumnus of an HBCU. We want to hear
about your story, So my HBCU Story Digital Library will
allow current HBCU students and alumni to share their stories.
More information is available at HBCU College day dot com.

(15:48):
You can upload a photo. The photo can be recent
or from when you attended your HBCU.

Speaker 1 (15:54):
More information is.

Speaker 6 (15:55):
Available at HBCU College Day dot com.

Speaker 7 (15:59):
Programming is possible in part by supports from thirty eight
to fifteen Media, led by Emmy and n DOUBLEACP Image
Award winning television producer Rashaan McDonald. Thirty eight fifteen Media
offers social media management, podcast production, designs logos, and develops websites.
Additional services include brand management and career development consulting services.

(16:24):
More information is available at info at thirty eight fifteen
Media dot com.

Speaker 1 (16:29):
Keep winning.

Speaker 4 (16:32):
Now, let's return to Money Making Conversations Masterclass with Rashawn McDonald.
If you have a question or comments, call four oh
four eight eight oho nine two five five.

Speaker 3 (16:43):
Hi.

Speaker 1 (16:43):
You doing This is Rushaan McDonald host this show Money
Making Commsation Masterclass. On the show, I'm interviewing Chef Jernard Wells.
He hosts a new show Kitchen and the New Soul
Kitchen Remax on KLEOTV. Tell me this Chef Denard Wills
tell me first of all, New Soul Kitchen and then
New Soul Kitchen remix tell us about what the show is,
and then what's the difference between the two shows.

Speaker 3 (17:06):
Yes, New Soul Kitchen Remixes is my longer format where
I take you through recipes that you may have been
having some problems with some some new innovative things that
you wanted. But that's my thirty minute format show. And
the whole gist of what New Soul Kitchen is is
bringing it back to us the way we cook, how

(17:27):
we cook, but in a more active and healthier life.
How to get rid of some of that, excusing some
of the bad things, replaced with good stuff to still
obtain or flavor. Now New Soul Kitchen looking.

Speaker 1 (17:44):
For you move farther. You broke up when you was
explaining us the difference between the two shows, if you
can repeat that, because you you was in the middle
of explaining it. Just it just broke up because I
don't want to go to the other show that I
getting a clear explanation of what the first show is.

Speaker 3 (17:58):
Yes, Lou is that it's the longer platform show. Well,
what I'm showing people on New Soul Kitchen is how
to create some of those nostalgic meals that we love.
Whether it's whether it's odds tails, whether it's jerk lamb chops,
whether it's the Sweet Tea Brian Fried chicken. Those are
the things that I'm doing on New Soul Kitchen. But

(18:20):
not only do I show you how to do make
Sweet Tea Brian Fried chicken, but I show you how
to take it from from the from the fryer to
the oven, and you finish baking at the remaining way
to pull out the trans facts, but you still got
that beautiful christy skin on the outside and it's still
moist and juicy on the inside. That's our That's my

(18:41):
thirty minute show. And it's and it's more so about
just really bring it, bringing the deer into the home
and allowing you to cook along with me. It's more
of an interactive show where we typically we put out
the recipes ahead of time, So if you go to
the my my cleo dot tv website down load to recipes,

(19:01):
you can cook along with me while watching me cook.
Because everything that I do on the show, I actually
cooked my meals in real time, so by the time
the show is ending, I've actually cooked and played it
up and showed you how you can do that in
that timeframe. That's what Nussou Kitchen is about now new
sold Kitchen remix, which I really love having fun with

(19:23):
that show Rashan, because it's about, as I say, short
on time, but you want all the flavor. I show
you how to create a meal in within fifteen minutes
or less. Now, the fun part with me is is
because as I traveled all over the world experience in
different foods from restaurants, and so many people inboxed me

(19:43):
wanting to see recipes that me create dishes. That's what
we take those inboxes, those emails, those dms, and that's
what I based that show off of. So if you
ever want to wonder if the viewer or if you
as the person who's watching my show has an impact
and I pay attention to it, I do eat If

(20:05):
you inboxed me, whether it was on Instagram or email
me about a dish that you would like to see,
those are the recipes that I pulled from. Hey, I
went to this restaurant and I ate one of the
best vegetarian Philly cheese steaks that I could. Can you
show me how to make it? That's stuff that you
come up on new soul kitchen remix.

Speaker 1 (20:26):
Now here's here's something that you know, I think I
can cook. So cabbages, you know, cabbage and bacon. So
I I'm old school. So I go in there, I
go my cat. It takes me three hours. It was
two and a half hours. Three hours do cabbages, you know,
put it in the water and wilton. Then I chop

(20:48):
of that, you know, fry of bacon, and then I
make shoes your reachout and put it in there. And
you know, everybody just love my bacon. Now, when this
brother talked about he can show you how to do
it in fifteen minutes, he came over and cracked my
face because he came by my office and I have
before a kitchen and he said, I'm gonna make some
cabbage and taking a cabine. Can you explain to them

(21:12):
how I was You wouldn't say I was doing it wrong.
I just wasn't doing it with with the with the
knowledge that you had on how he could be done quick.
And when he explained it, some of y'all might be
doing it the same way too, But Rashard McDonald was
doing taking two and a half to three hours to
do cabbage, and your way, which was fantastic, was what

(21:33):
fifteen minutes?

Speaker 3 (21:35):
At fifteen minutes and every day Rachond Tomato Tomortew, there's
no right or wrong.

Speaker 1 (21:42):
Yes it is, Yes it is, Yes it is because
when I saw you, I went, you're dumb. Rashon, You're
dumb because you spend three hours of your life doing
something he did in fifteen minutes, and I do it.
I do it that way all the time. Could you
explain to everybody who may be caught up like I
was because my mom me how to cook, you know,
and my sisters that's how they cooked their cabbage, you know.

(22:04):
But the way you did it was it? What did
you learn that in culinary school? It was just something
you just learned or that's the way it should be done.

Speaker 3 (22:11):
And then tell everybody, HIH's done that that I actually
I picked that recipe up years ago from my father.
My father was definitely big on the course growing up
in Mississippi around nothing but farmland and always bringing in
our own crop and just seeing different ways my father
when my mother would be out at work and if

(22:33):
my father was at home. First he believed in fix
the meals on a flash for us so he can
get us fit and he can go on and finish
or whatever else he needed to be doing. And one
of the things, especially what he would teach me, when
it comes to any greenery, whether it's whether it's cabbage
or whether it's collarge greens, we know that greenery has

(22:54):
the most water in it, so we don't have to
add a lot of water to boiling that. What we
do is we saw ta first. Since when you start
sawta in, that's gonna instantly pull the will out of it.
So as you sawta in it, the heat is gonna
start it to whip. The moisture starts to come out.
Once the heat starts to whether it's cabbage started to

(23:15):
wheel down, then you fold in all your other flavors,
whether it's crush, red peppers, men's garlic, bell peppers, onions,
you fold them and you allow those flavors to start
wilting down. Then the skillet, and then what you do
is for that look as we call it, that pot
liquor that we love. Once you sutate it down. It's

(23:35):
done at this point. So what then you come back
and you add in whether it's your chicken stock, your
vegetable stop, whatever you add that, you add subtle amounts
back to it. What that's gonna do is deglade the
bottom of the pot what skill it that you're saute
in in. But also it's gonna rehydrate it with extra

(23:56):
flavor and boom within fifteen minutes done because you've already
cooked it with the salt tan. What we do is
we take a product that's already that's already grown and
full of water. That's what nature intended, you know, green abbage,
all of those are water based. Lattice all on water based.
So we take something that's full of cabbage and then

(24:18):
we submerge it in more water, and then we wait
for it to whilt down, and it takes longer because
what with the reason why cabbage wheels down to get salt.
Salt is by pulling the moisture out of it.

Speaker 1 (24:32):
And I saw it and I went wow, fifteen minutes
right in front of my eyes, some of the best
tasting cabbage I ever had in my life. I experienced that.
But by learning how to do it right. And basically
that's our segue to your cook book, Southern Inspired more
than one hundred delicious dishes from My American Table to yours.

(24:53):
Tell us more about that book and tell everybody how
they can get a copy of it.

Speaker 3 (24:57):
Yes, please go visit min go to Emma dot com,
Barnes and Nova Target all of them, but Southern and Spot.
My American Table is a testament to my culinary journey
of growing up in Mississippi and really learning about food,
but more so how food connects us as an individual,
and to take it further. In Southern and Spot, I

(25:20):
tell the story. I tell stories about our journey as
African Americans and why we are on the forefront of
food as you know it. See, when people see us
and they hear the word soul food, the what they
have to start realizing is soul food is really American
cuisine because we created that cuisine. You take Africans who

(25:43):
came over on slave ships. They didn't know anything about
Western civilization. What they did know is they know how
the crops and everything growed on the continent where they
came from, which was different from here. They knew their
recipes because when you learn a recipe and you learn
how to cook it, like riding the bike is just
locked in your mind. They knew their African recipes, so

(26:04):
they landed here in America. Now they're dealing with different sore,
different crops. What they did was they took their African
recipes and applied them to the food that we eat here.
Not only was we cooking in the big house, but
we was cooking in the field hands suit. So people
always talk about, yeah, we got the worst of the

(26:25):
worst to cook, which was the chiplins, the hog malls,
the ribs, all of that stuff. We not only cooked
the worst and made it good, but we was also
cooking the best because inside of the inside of the
plantation house where we was cooking, we was cooking the
best food for them, right, and then taking the scraps

(26:46):
and cooking it for the field hands. So we our
expertise in culinary was refined all the way around, because
culinary wasn't always a good job or a good steal
to be in. It was considered hard work. They didn't
have eight seves in the kitchen back then, and lord
knows they didn't have uther and miss them cast side
skilling looks so good.

Speaker 1 (27:05):
Shift you know it, Wills. I will see you November sixteen.
My friend, thank you for taking the time and sharing
your Thanksgivan delukacs on and Christmas stories because you are
truly a star in the kitchen. And we talked soon. Okay,
my friend, thank you for having me all right, thank
you and again well talk to you next week. The
third and final series of the Value Proposition is Rushan McDonald.

Speaker 4 (27:28):
Thank you for joining us for this edition of Money
Making Conversations Masterclass. Money Making Conversations Masterclass with Rushan McDonald
is produced by thirty eight to fifteen Media Inc. More
information about thirty eight fifteen Media Inc. Is available at
thirty eight to fifteen media dot com. And always remember
to lead with your gifts.

Speaker 6 (28:00):
Anything about about

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