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May 14, 2024 35 mins
Today, Doug Pike interviews Dr. Andrew Tritter about dysphagia.
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(00:01):
Remember what it was impossible to misplacethe TV remote because you were the TV
remote. Remember when music sounded likethis? Remember when social media was truly
social? Hey John, how's itgoing today? Well, this show is
all about you. This is fiftyplus with Doug Pike. Helpful information on

(00:28):
your finances, good health, andwhat to do for fun. Fifty plus
brought to you by the UT HealthHouston Institute on Aging Informed Decisions for a
healthier, happier life and by TexasIndoor Air Quality Specialists because clean air is
healthier air. And now fifty pluswith Doug Pike. All right, here

(00:50):
we go. Tuesday edition of theprogram starts right now. First live edition.
I take Mondays off in case you'rebrand new and didn't know that.
Oh, if you ever tune inon a Monday, you'll hear me.
But even if there was a camerain here, you wouldn't see me because
on a good Monday, I'm eitherfishing or playing golf this time of year,
on a bad Monday, doing choresand working around the house and just

(01:12):
having all kinds of big time fun. Next Monday, by the way,
will be Roofer Day, So I'vegot to wait for Skeeter and his crew
to come over and take care ofa new roof that I needed after the
hailstorm back in March. Finally gettingthis done. It takes a while,
and there are a lot of peoplethat all the roofers in town are having
to help out who have serious problemswith their roof. Mine still works,

(01:34):
but it had significant damage to itbecause of the hail, and so I'm
in line for the new one andI'm patiently waiting. I'm not going to
rush anybody. If somebody else hasgot leaks in their house, then they
can step in front of line forme ahead of meet. I don't have
a problem with that. If youhad shared this, if you have shared

(01:55):
this program with friends, let methank you very much. I appreciate you
doing that. Quick question, Will, what the hell was that bright orange
ball in the sky this morning?I have no idea. I haven't seen
it in what four or five days? It seems like maybe a week seen
the sun there. I think wehad a glimpse, did we not last
week? Maybe for like probable minutes, Yeah, for a little bit,

(02:16):
But it's been generally pretty rainy andgloomy out It was bright, man,
I felt for when I turned onto the Southwest Freeway this morning, coming
up from the southwest side of town, almost felt like I needed those eclipse
glasses. Oh yeah, that mighthave helped. It was just so bright
and the light was just so harshCompared to what we've dealt with. Our

(02:39):
eyeballs have been opened up to aboutprobably I don't know, four millimeters on
the pupils on these gray days we'vehad, did you know Will By the
way, that if memory serves,from a time, I attended a Swarowski
binocular seminar that was held for Idon't know, probably two dozen Swolerowsky Cellars

(03:01):
retailers in this region and me Igot invited to go to that because that's
some pretty good glass. And thisseminar lasted, I want to say.
They had us in a classroom onand off. We took breaks, but
we were there for the better partof probably six hours learning about binoculars,
and I remember some of it.I do remember that in the brightest sunlight,

(03:25):
our pupils are only capable of openingto I think about six millimeters,
and that's just as high as itgoes. And that's why with some binoculars
when they brag about how much lightthey can they can draw in and be
used in low light situations, dependingon the magnification and the diameter of this

(03:46):
and whatever's the bottom line is youreyes can only absorb, they can only
take in so much light and superdark. Then you don't need or you're
gonna need as much as you canget. But there comes a point where
there's there's a point of no returnin some binocular makers, some unscrupulous ones
will tell you they can do better. And then conversely, on the on

(04:10):
the beach, you don't want totake in a lot of light because your
eyes are going to open up toomuch and it's gonna be very very hard
on them. But be like lookinginto a at the golden ball in the
sky. That's not good. Allright, it's it's been a while.
It's been a while since we whatfour days, well, yeah, no,
three days, Saturday, Sunday andMonday. And something happened to me

(04:34):
over the weekend that I didn't knowhad happened to I don't think has happened
to many of us in this audience, but it did for me on about
I don't know, it's about noonishor so on Saturday, sitting here minding
my own business after my outdoor showover on kbmme and the phone rings.
I look down. It's my son. Oh what's up, Bud, said

(04:56):
Dad? There's bees in the house. I said, really, yeah,
there's bees in the house. Dad. How many? I'm not really sure
yet, but I've counted about adozen or so. And they're here,
and they're there, and they're buzzingall around. And I knew my wife
was downstairs, and that was mygut said, ask him this question.

(05:17):
How's mom doing? She hadn't heardhim yet, she hadn't seen them yet.
Said okay, good, that's good. Let's keep it that way.
And to her credit, when Igot home, she was very aware of
what was going on. And tothe credit of the bees, they had
actually kind of calmed down. ButI wanted to make sure we could get

(05:38):
them all out of there. SoI called a bee keeper, which isn't
cheap, by the way. Beekeepersearn their keep, so to say,
But for what the job was thatI needed doing someday, I'm a well,
this is a business opportunity for you. Actually think about this, Okay,

(05:58):
So these guys come out the manI talked to on the phone,
the guy who runs the operation said, yeah, what you had there?
Because between about one o'clock when Icalled, in between four and six when
they were going to arrive, suddenlythere's no more bees. Where the heck
did they go? I opened theattic, thinking I'm gonna hear nothing.

(06:21):
I go around the perimeter of thehouse where before where when I called them,
I had seen a spot. Howthey're going in right there. That's
what's going on, going in,coming out, going in, coming out.
H How many bees do I havein my house? I don't know.
Long story, short is I learnedthat those were these scouts. Are
you aware of the Scout bees?I am not aware of the scout bees.

(06:44):
If a hive decides it's time,if they get evicted, if at
the time they move out, theywant to go to a better neighborhood,
whatever, they hire real estate agentsaka in the b world, scouts and
those scouts from the hive all readyonly a minute. I'll get to it.
I'll make it through. The scoutsgo find a place that looks pretty
good and check it out, andif they like it, they run back

(07:09):
to the main swarm, the mainbig giant hive, and they say,
come on, we're going, we'removing. Let's go, and everybody packs
up and the queen flies kind ofin the middle of the whole bunch and
they go to the new place.Well, these guys, for five hundred
and fifty dollars will come to yourhouse and if you have a bigger problem,
they'll fix it for that too.But I had no problem at that

(07:30):
point because the scouts had already bailed. And so what they do then is
they apply this this powdery substance allthe way around your house, all over
the house, using this big slappywand brush mess and it's not messy really,
but the bottom line is it doesn'tkill the bees, which I'm in
favor of. We need all ourhoney bees, and it does stink to

(07:53):
them so badly that they won't comeback guaranteed for thirty days. At that
point, my wife looked me andgo, why are we paying them?
The bees are already gone. Saidno, I'm not paying them because they're
gone. I'm paying them because Idon't want them to come back. Preventative
thirty days thirty days. If theydon't come back in thirty days, they're
not coming back now, they wouldn'treco somewhere else. It's gonna have a

(08:15):
new roof, it's gonna have anew door. I got my new door
coming in from Primo Doors here rightshortly after the roof. We're gonna do
the roof first, just in casesomething goes flying toward the door. All
right, I gotta take a littlebreak here speaking of homes and whatnot.
No bees in the kirk Homes.I promise you. This is the twenty
twenty four Builder of the Year asnamed by Southern Living. And what a

(08:37):
prestigious award that is, and rightfullyso, because for three generations now,
thirty plus years, kirk Holmes hasbeen building custom homes throughout this region,
basically mostly starting let's say, onthe northwest side of Houston and then fanning
out all through the hill country.Anywhere you want to go build out there,
they will. They will come outand walk the property with you if

(09:01):
you want. They'll sit down withyou and help you with as much or
a little as little of the interiorof the exterior. Their architectural team will
help you configure the rooms just theway you want them. It just the
size you want and lo and beholdwhat takes a little bit longer than that?
Low and behold, and about whatone hundred and twenty days. I'm
guessing I don't know. They willhand you the keys to your dream home.

(09:26):
It's just that simple when you allowkirk Hoolmmes to streamline the experience with
all their expertise, with all theirexperience in the building industry. Good as
it gets. Twenty years structural warranty. That's twice the standard two by six
exterior walls to keep the heat andthe cold and the bees out. Just

(09:48):
bees are mine. Kirkholmes dot comis a website. Go there, get
started on your dream home. Kyou are k because at kirk Holmes it's
all about you. What's life withouta net? I suggest you go to
bed and sleep it off. Justwait until the show's over. Sleepy.
Back to Doug Pike as fifty pluscontinues. All right, welcome back to

(10:20):
fifty plus. Thank you for listeningon this beautiful Tuesday afternoon, sunshiny out
there. I got a few littleclouds out there. They don't count.
They're not dark enough to drop anyrain on us, so just disregard them
and keep on moving. Thanks bythe way for we're sharing your lunch hour
with us. We'll talk in thissegment about something called dysphagia, which in

(10:41):
plain English translates to difficulty swallowing,and to help, I will enlist doctor
Andrew Tritter as sistant Professor and Directorof Laryngology at the Texas Voice Performance Institute
and in practice with ut physicians.Welcome aboard, doctor. How's it going.
I'm doing great? Thank you.We actually have wings to de livered
here to the studio, or notto the studio, but to the station,

(11:03):
and I got. Will doesn't realizehe's got. He didn't get out
there in time. I don't thinkthere's much left, so but we just
we digress. Let's start at myfavorite starting point, please, And that's
just a simple definition of the condition. What is this phasia? Well,
it's pretty much exactly as you described. It's a very big term that just
means difficulty swallowing. But as youmight imagine, that's something that can be

(11:24):
a lot of different things for differentpeople. It could be something as simple
as it takes me longer to getmy food down than it did before,
or I tend to cough or chokewhen I'm swallowing, or even I just
have difficulty chewing my food compared tohow I used to. So there's a
pretty wide range, but difficulty swallowingencompasses at all. All right, fair
enough? Is this something that weall are likely to experience if we live

(11:46):
long enough, or is it justa smaller percentage of the population. Well,
I mean, to some extent,almost all of us will experience it
on small levels. So I mean, if you've ever just kind of maybe
swallowed something down the wrong pipe alittle bit, maybe cough or choke.
It's not common to have people havelittle, small moments throughout their life of
difficulty swallowing here and there, ormaybe you fallow something a little too big

(12:07):
and it feels like it roughs youup on the way down. But the
extent of which it becomes a problemtends to vary across the population. Obviously,
as we get older, a lotof the mechanics behind this overly complicated
process they get a little bit weigheddown, and it becomes more challenging for
some people to overcome. And youtend to have more difficulty, or rather
more propensity for difficulty than you wouldotherwise have. But that plus other conditions

(12:33):
that people can succumb to that canmake this a problem. It hits a
lot of people. So if itjust happens ever now and then nothing to
worry about. But is there anypoint at which it becomes Okay, I
gotta do something about this? Yeah? I think you know, if you
start to notice that it's becoming amuch more frequent problem, right, having
difficult things down if you feel like, especially if you have pain with swallowing,

(12:56):
that's one of those warning signs thatit's definitely worthwhile getting checked out sooner
rather than later. But you know, if you're potentially getting pneumonia's often meaning
maybe you're swallowing something down the wrongway and it's going towards your lungs where
it shouldn't be, or maybe you'relosing weight because of the swallowing issue that
you have going on. Those typesof things should really prompt an evaluation by
a position. Are there any specificconditions, any specific ties to genetics or

(13:22):
whatever that we can contribute to thisin more serious cases? Absolutely well.
There's a whole host of different typesof either genetic conditions or other even like
infections that you can get in yourthroat that can lead you to feeling hard
to swallow. The bigger ones,however, actually tend to affect the older
population, and that's really just thingslike strokes, different types of dementia,

(13:46):
and other types of neurological conditions thattake this complicated, you know, series
of coordinated and muscle movements, andthey make it a little more difficult than
it was already in the first place. So stroke patients especially are one that
we all might have family members thatwe've seen where if they have something unfortunate
like that happen, where you canwatch them struggle a little bit as they're
in their recovery phases. I sawone reference to food insecurities. What exactly

(14:11):
is a food insecurity? I'm notI'm pretty secure around food. I know
it's going to go in my mouth. But how does that get into the
mix? Well, you know,I think for most of us, fortunately
here in the United States, wetend to not have as much insecurity with
food, meaning difficulty with access toOK, that's what I thought it meant.
But you go a the other countriesstruggle a little bit more as the

(14:33):
food isn't as much of the ofa contributor to this type of an issue
as it is more age, certaintypes of medical conditions, neurological conditions,
things like that. Yeah, thefood insecurity I think would be the cause
of something else I read that istied to this, and that's anxiety right
for sure. I mean obviously gettingworried about where is meal going to come

(14:56):
from? Am I going to havesomething to eat? Can certainly make you
anxious about it. And then whenyou do finally get something to eat,
you know, if you're still prettynervous and on edge, you can make
it a little harder for you tokind of slow down and concentrate on eating.
What about doctor Andrew Trader here onfifty plus, let's talk about the
symptoms you mentioned that you've got pain, You've got just generally a little bit

(15:16):
of difficulty swallowing. Is there anyone amongst those many symptoms that's like a
real kicker that says, Okay,I got to go see doctor Trader?
Uh? You know, I thinkpain is probably one of the more ones
that it really prompts Now, granted, that's not a common situation for someone
with swallowing difficulty to complain of pain, but that's one that should really prompt

(15:37):
an evaluation. I would say themore common types of things that you would
experience would be just feeling like thingsdon't want to go down, they're getting
stuck on the way, maybe coffeingor tending to choke a little bit more
when you're eating and drinking, kindof noting maybe you're having more difficulty with
liquids and not so much solid foods, or the reverse, having more trouble
with solid foods, Feeling like maybeyou know you're if you've got some voice

(16:00):
changes going along with it too.People take for granted their voice with regards
to swallowing your voice. Actually,your vocal cords primarily exist to keep you
from swallowing something down the wrong way. They're kind of protective, and secondarily
they help us, you know,they give us the sound that we all
know is our voice. But ifyou're not able to really close your vocal
cords, well it's pretty easy tohave stuff slip down towards your lungs where

(16:22):
they don't need to be going.I just really learned something, right then,
is this something a primary care doctorcan diagnose or do we need to
just skip the line and go toyou. So it's a it's an interesting
question. There's there's not a lotof definitive, definitive voys of saying,
oh, you definitely have this problem. Someone complaining issues will show up to
any one of their main positions.Primary care physicians are great resources for this

(16:45):
because they can at least kind oftease out the what needs additional work up
and what testing before you get toa specialist. That being said, I
certainly see my fair share of peoplewho come to see me directly with this
kind of problem. But depending onwhat kinds of issues you're having, where
you're feeling things, how often inresponse to what kinds of foods, certain

(17:06):
testing may be needed to help figureout what specific cause you have for your
swallowing issue. And that that reallyI think directs things more than anything else,
is dispase you something that can bejust treated or fixed permanently. Which
where does it fall in that categoryor those categories? It keep giving you
all these wishy washy answers, butit really just depends so much fun.

(17:26):
But you know, for some things, it's as simple as say you have
a little bit of a stricture ornarrowing in your esophagus. Some people get
these just from maybe acid reflux,it causes a little scar that then forms
a little bit of obstruction. Ifyou just go in and dilate those with
the balloon, stretch it out alittle bit, sometimes that's enough to fix
it and be done with the problemaltogether. Other problems like maybe say you

(17:48):
did have a stroke unfortunately, andyou're still recovering and you're doing okay,
But getting all of these muscles tofire the way they need to and perfect
sequence with the same strength they oncehad, that can take a lot of
which usually falls on our physical therapistand speech and swallowing therapists in particular,
to help us get you back torecovery, Doctor Andrew Tridder helping us out

(18:11):
with dysphasia. Every now and thenit'll seem like I'm trying to swallow something
it just doesn't want to go,and then it goes and I just forget
about it. So I should bestill okay right in general? Yeah,
okay, I'll take that. I'lltake an in general okay at my age
any day, Doctor Andrew Tridder,Thank you so very much. I really
appreciate it, sir. Not aproblem. Happy to be here, bet

(18:33):
Bubby. All Right, we gottatake a little break here on the way
out, I will tell you allabout Texas Indoor Air Quality Specials. This
is the company that has, forgoodness, for more than twenty years been
going to people's homes and making surethat the air they breathe in that home
is as clean as it possibly canbe. And there are a lot of
guys who will show up at yourhouse in a van that's got wee clean

(18:57):
tiles and carpets and duck work andplumbing and everything else, but they're probably
not doing it the same way thatTexas IAQ does because what they use is
a patented truck mounted system that usessomething called a pneumatic whip to go through
every inch of your duct work allthe way back to the plenum and make

(19:18):
sure that there is nothing in there. The suction starts up, that whip
starts working its way through that ductwork, and when it's done, all
of those allergens, all of thosecontaminants are out of there and in the
truck. They also when they cometo your house, will clean each of
the units, the coils on yourunits, and then they will clean the
planum at that unit so that everyinch of that air traveling through your house.

(19:44):
Wherever it goes, it goes withoutpicking up something that you might breathe
later on that day and may causeyou to sneeze, cause your eyes to
itch. Any of that stuff,little special something that the owner will do
for you if you drop my namewhen you call and talk to them and
let them explain in detail exactly whatthey do and how they do it,
because it is a fantastic process.It is far more complete than what most

(20:11):
other companies will do to clean yourduckwork, and you will, for many
years to come afterward be breathing healthier, cleaner air. Those things are synonymous.
Clean air equals healthy air, samething. If it's not cleaned up.
If your duckwork has problems, you'renot breathing the best mercy. Somebody's
calling me pound two fifty healthy air. Pound two fifty healthy air. Now,

(20:37):
they sure don't make them like theyused to. That's why every few
months we wash them, check hisfluids and spray on a fresh coat of
wax. This is fifty plus withDugpike, all right, welcome back,

(21:00):
dug Bake show. No, notfifty plus. I do that all the
time. Well, I have twodifferent shows, you know, that it's
hard. Every now and then I'llgo it almost get out, spin out
fifty plus. When I'm talking onSaturday and Sunday. Usually get it right.
I guess I get it right moreoften than I get it wrong.
And that's just gonna have to be. That's just gonna have to be.

(21:22):
Okay, let me go back tothe front page here. Oh, by
the way, we didn't get tothe weather. The ten second weather forecast
great day tomorrow, rainy tomorrow morning, followed by four or five or maybe
even six more great days so longas you don't mind tickling the low nineties
for high temperatures. There's your weatherforecast went out yesterday morning. Oh the

(21:45):
market's how quick? Can I dothis too? Let's see here? Yeah,
looking at them a little while ago, the same yo yo act not
moving more than a fraction of apoint, except for the Russell two thousand,
which was up one point zero ninepercent, which just significant in less
than a day. That was justsince the open, so it was only
two or three hours old at thatpoint, oiled down more than a dollar

(22:08):
and needs to fall about another Idon't know ten at least before I'll be
the least bit impressed. That wasat I want to say, seventy eight
dollars in change something like that,and gold thanks to Houston Gold Exchange up
thirteen dollars an ounce today, sittingat roughly twenty three point fifty six an
ounce when I last checked. Movinginto the meat of this stuff, let's

(22:34):
start with COVID. Saw a veryinteresting story this morning about COVID in its
origin. Yet another story broke abouttwo scientists who were directly involved with the
Wuhan laboratory that's believed by more andmore people as more and more information comes
out, believed to be the sourceof the virus that threatened the world and

(22:57):
killed millions of people in it.And from what I read, I didn't
read at all, I didn't havetime this morning, but from what I
read in that story, there isreason to believe that the Chinese lab safety
standards are nearly what ours are,and that these two men, even still
after testifying before Congress recently, thatthey still probably know lots more than they've

(23:18):
told. They just haven't been askedthe right questions. Yet. It's significant
that what was happening in there hasbeen established in that Wuhan lab has been
established as some pretty serious gain offunction research in an environment that these men,

(23:40):
at least one of them I sawquoted, believed not to be nearly
so stringent and strict and safe asour safety protocols about keeping that stuff in
the lab and not letting it escape. And there's also some conflicting information actually
on whether one of the men whohad all access clearance to that facility knew

(24:03):
about its research into the coronavirus andbad viruses and other viruses that were being
studied there, and their potential lethalitywith gain of function stuff, and whether
he even knew what all was beingresearched there. More and more, we're
just seeing legitimate reason to believe thatthe COVID virus originated and leaked out of

(24:26):
that lab. That's what. Hey, it's quacking like a dunck, and
it's got a beak and it's gotweb beat. Okay. And finally,
both both men conceded some things thatwere never asked of them or anyone else's
initial investigations of COVID. It's justthere's still a lot of stuff under the
rug. So much stuff left underthe rug with this, and I hope

(24:47):
it all at some point before Idied, I'd kind of like to know
the real story in something I calleduse It when you need it. It
was a great story at the Thinkerthis morning about how to talk to people
on the extreme left. The authorfound himself recently in a conversation with just
such a friend who led with Trumpbelongs in jail, And rather than challenge

(25:10):
the guy or ask bluntly where'd youget your information and trigger him, probably
the move, this author says,is to say something a little simpler,
say something a little calmer, like, ah, hey, gosh, man,
what'd he do? Or really tellme more? And the cherry on

(25:32):
it it's called the technique is calledmirroring. You're just giving them a chance
to say what they just said adifferent way and feel really good about themselves,
and you can say how do youknow so much? And maybe throw
in one of these, a coupleof these actually, Wow, you are
so clever, you're so smart,and just let them just bathe in their
own glory while they while they saystuff that's really probably not true. Mmm,

(25:56):
little short time, big time,will no time, no time,
no no no, no no noman, holy cat'll stop it. Oh
well, okay, I can dothat. A late health Late health is
the company that I want you togo to with, not a company,

(26:17):
it's a clinic, clinics actually aroundtown. I missed on two shots.
A late health is a group ofclinics around town where you can go that
Their main focus, actually the one. The procedure they do most often is
prostate artery embolization for folks, formen my age, who know what it's
like to have to get up inthe middle of the night and go to
the bathroom more than once, whoknow all the all the symptoms of an

(26:40):
enlarged prostate not very fun, anda late can make it all go away
within a couple of hours in theoffice. What they do is they seek
out and find the exact artery that'sfeeding that that bulbous thing, and they
shut it down. No blood supplymeans no more growth, and it actually
means shrinking until it's just kind ofgone and not bothering you anymore. Same

(27:03):
for the ladies, and they're fibroids, same for ugly veins, same for
headaches. Even in many cases anythingthat's caused by something vascular they can address
and treat at late health, andmost of it Most of what they do
is covered by Medicare and Medicaid aswell. They're also doing a lot of
regenerative medicine too. If you're inchronic pain and have been for just about

(27:23):
as long as you can stand it, and you've got to get rid of
it somehow, someway, don't turnthe pills. Go to a late health
and see if they can help youwith regenerative medicine. Seven one three five
eight eight thirty eight eighty eight.Seven one three five eight eight thirty eight
eighty eight. Or go to alatehealth dot com. That's alat e a
latehealth dot com. Old guys rule, and of course women never get old.

(27:52):
If you want to avoid sleeping onthe couch, Okay, well,
I think that sounds like a goodplan. Fifty plus continues. Here's more.
Doug, welcome back, Thanks forlistening fifty plus on KPRC this Tuesday,

(28:12):
beautiful Tuesday afternoon. I might haveto go out and do something,
see if I can start acclimating myselfto the heat. Almost melted and fell
apart yesterday. It was so bloominghot and so muggy. It wasn't so
hot, really, it was muggyas could be, though, and it's
the first time I've really tried topush myself under those conditions. By the
way, Garth, if you arelistening, I did get the email,

(28:33):
I did get the ask and thecompany the binoculars I was talking about are
Swarovski swa r Vosky, a veryhigh end brand, very excellent binoculars.
If you want to invest in them, you're more than welcome to do so.
They're wonderful. I've had one pairof years ago, and I don't
even remember where they ended up.I honestly don't there. I do know

(28:57):
more than a little about binoculars,and if you wanted to talk about them
you could. You feel free toemail me. I'd be happy to answer
your questions. Uh, Doug Pikeat iHeartMedia dot com. Doug Pike at
iHeartMedia dot com. It's just assimple as that. The where am I
on all this mess? M hmmm, oh this is this is good will.

(29:19):
You're gonna love this and you willyou know what you'll feel right at
home. You're a trendsetter and youdon't even know it. Okay, remember
what was it a couple of threemonths ago? I'm sure you wanted to
put in your rear view mirror.But when you had the water heater issue,
yes, well, the Washington Posthad a story earlier, I think

(29:41):
a day or two ago that recommendedThe recommendation, by the way, comes
from someone who is who's got areally big climate tambourineing ding climate climb,
climate climate climate like that, andshe recommends that you not only wash your
dishes and you're closing cold water,but wash your own self. We need

(30:04):
to take cold showers, will allof us every day, you know,
to save the planet from a problemthat doesn't exist. I like a cold
shower. I got used to it. It's really Yeah, it's a good
way to wake up. Well,what if you just want something to relax
you. That's not it? Isit that just I want to be relaxed.

(30:27):
If good at bed, I don'tuse the shower, all right?
Yeah? Anyway, yeah, no, until these people have just lost their
mind. She's with some group.Where's the name of it? I wrote
it down here is the American Councilfor an Energy Efficient Economy. We are
already one of the most energy efficienteconomies in the entire world, on the

(30:52):
entire planet. We are really goodat getting oil out of the ground cleanly,
much better than most countries in theworld, if not all of them.
But that didn't stop our president fromtelling us, no, we don't
wow, we don't need anymore.We're just gonna all go electric in what
I think it's twenty thirty five,when California is going down the tubes.

(31:15):
That when they when they realize whata horrible mistake they've made. When up
in northern California half the eighteen theelectric eighteen wheelers are just parked on the
side of the road. That's they'regoing to figure it out at some point,
I don't know, maybe when acouple of them starve, until you
know, call me back when everymember of Congress and the President and his

(31:38):
family and everybody else who's on thatteam starts showering in cold water, every
single one of them. Everywhere theygo, hotels, yep, cold water
at home, hard day at work, you just want to come in and
relax and take a bath, coldwater. See how that works out for
you. President Biden's campaign folks,by the way, I'm very disappointed,

(32:01):
and I'm doubtful they did this withhis blessing. They ran a Mother's Day
ad that shows just how ridiculous andpathetic and desperate they are. The message
was this on Mother's Day, areminder Donald Trump stands only for himself and
not for mothers across America and theirfamilies. The stakes of this election are

(32:25):
high for all Americans, but especiallymoms across our country, who will suffer
under a second Trump term. Youknow, I end quote by the way
I remember his term, and Iwas doing pretty good. I would didn't
have to think about what groceries costs, didn't have to think about what gas

(32:46):
costs, didn't have to worry aboutthe cost of a hotel room if I
want to take a vacation. Iwas feeling pretty good. Now not so
much. Groceries up forty percent,lean up, everything up. Everything costs
more than it did and there's noend in sight. They just they want

(33:07):
to They just want to raise taxesand print money to help people all over
the world, while we Americans suffer. And we've invited in ten twelve,
what is it, fourteen million?I don't know how many now, but
there's way too many of them.I know that. And nobody knows who
they are, nobody knows where theyare. I heard a song that was

(33:30):
written about a teenage girl who's beingwho was being told, yes, you
need to come with me, yourmother's waiting for you in America. And
this man convinced her to go andsent her, took her across the border
and then handed her off to anotherman who then took her and moved her

(33:55):
right into traffic. She was trafficked, and it's a horror. The lyrics
are just so powerful, so powerful. I wish I knew who. I
can't remember the man's name who wrotethat song, but it was it was
a real eye opener about just thatone aspect of the disaster, the utter

(34:16):
disaster that is our southern border rightnow. Fentanyl coming across with all these
people. They nobody can nobody cancheck every bag that's coming in with all
these people and they're shipping there.It's just teetotal mess. I want to
get out of this. We didn'tget to do anything fun today because and
I didn't even get to all mybad stuff. Where is the page?

(34:37):
By the way, this printer printedout on two sides, so I'm having
a hard time finding stuff. Okay, Well, where's the beef? Also
wears the beef? Or Seniors alreadyknew that where's the beef? Twelve percent
of Americans are responsible for eating halfof the beef consumed in the US now

(34:57):
twelve percent eating half the beef.You need a you need to get some
leaf. There are not that manyvegans. There are not that many chicken
eaters. I don't know anybody whoI don't know that I know anybody who
doesn't eat Yes, I do.Actually, will you you don't eat beef?
Do you? I mean I eatbeef sometimes? Well, I do
know at least two people who don't. And like whatever, you eat chicken

(35:21):
and you eat fish and eat everythingbut a cow ah ten seconds, I
can do that. Oh, Iwill take it. Take it. I'll
let somebody else take it from here. We'll be back tomorrow, same time,
same station. Bring some friends.Thanks a lot, audios.
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