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May 11, 2024 38 mins
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(00:00):
Remember when it was impossible to misplacethe TV remote because you were the TV
remote. Remember when music sounded likethis, Remember when social media was truly
social? Hey John, how's itgoing today? Well, this show is
all about you. This is fiftyplus with Doug Pike. Helpful information on

(00:27):
your finances, good health, andwhat to do for fun. Fifty plus
brought to you by the UT HealthHouston Institute on Aging Informed Decisions for a
healthier, happier life, and byTexas Indoor Air Quality Specialists because clean air
is healthier air. And now fiftyplus with Doug Pike. All right,

(00:50):
Friday edition to fifty plus starts rightnow. Thank you all for listening on
this Friday before Mother's Day. Youknow, it actually looks pretty nice outside,
and I'll take that after what we'vebeen through for a while. Same
almost a replay tomorrow of these conditions. Kind of warm, but not quite
as warm as it's going to gettoday. And no rain. Once again,

(01:11):
that's good. Let me move.It's just a little bit there we
go. Mother's Day, on theother hand, packs a fifty to fifty
shot of rain. But you haveto remember that that is that's based on
the Greater Houston metropolitan area, whichis what about seventy five miles by seventy

(01:32):
five miles, So yeah, Ithink that's almost a daily bet that you
could get one drop of rain withinthat area and about probably about about seven
eight thousand square miles I will think, or one hundred, yeah, seven
or eight hundred square miles. It'sa lot, I know it is.

(01:53):
No, it is more than that, it is thousands. In any event,
it's a long ways to the otherside of huge them from wherever you
are, so don't plant, don'tchange your plans just yet. Markets were
half green, half red, butagain not by much in either direction.
And gold, thanks to Houston gooldexchangedot com up twenty eight bucks to be

(02:15):
at least about an hour ago attwenty three sixty eight. That's a lot
of money for an ounce of gold. As I've been telling you, if
you have, if you have afew pieces lying around that aren't getting anyware
time now might be a good chanceto drop them off and buy yourself a
sack of groceries and oil. Herewe go again, north of seventy nine

(02:37):
dollars a barrel, once again forno good reason. And by the way,
I did some checking. In twentynineteen and twenty twenty, average price
of a barrel of oil somewhere betweenfifty five and sixty bucks. There was
an anomaly in early twenty twenty thatdropped the price below twenty dollars even but

(02:59):
that you can throw out. Andthen around the election it was hanging around
the load to mid forties. Andthen after the election, when we got
our new president in his first year, the price shot up like a bullet
to more than eighty dollars a barrel, and it peaked in April of twenty

(03:19):
twenty two at one hundred and fifteenor so dollars a barrel. Everybody remember
that. You might if you rememberthat, if you remember how it felt
not to be able to drive tothe grocery store to get groceries without taking
out a loan, you might wantto. You might want to just sit
back and think about what you're goingto do come November. Make sure you

(03:43):
make the right choice. And Imean, here we go again. Right
now, we're north of seventy ninedollars a barrel for absolutely no reason except
for the signatures of the man whoholds the highest office in our country.
Right now in his first couple ofdays in office, he hamstrong the entire
oil industry, and no matter whatthey tell you, there's still are issues

(04:06):
with that. There are still areissues. And unless the White House changes
hands, it's gonna be back northof one hundred before we can blink,
if we can still afford to blink. By that point. It is Mother's
Day weekend. I met, asI mentioned earlier, and my mother is
gone. She passed away several yearsago now, and I'm sincerely grateful for

(04:28):
my wife and the role she's takenwith our son. We've had our own
challenges with him. Good kid,really blessed with intellect and athleticism. And
if he chooses the right path andfollows his mother's direction on her side of
what she's teaching in mine as theman teaching the young boy how to become

(04:48):
a better man, I think he'llhave a successful, productive life. My
mom was the rock in our family. My father. I learned this somewhere
around middle school, maybe high schoolthat and I hadn't really put two and
two together because there was really nothingbeing said about this that far, that
long ago. But my father wasan alcoholic, okay, and he had

(05:12):
been for many years, and tohis credit, he beat that. How
are we doing on time? Canyou give me like two minut four?
Oh good, ye, give melike a two and a one in I'll
field cows in here? Where willgo? By the way, he just
disappear on us Orleans. Oh that'sright, party boy. Oh yeah,
party boy. Okay. So anyway, that's where my dad was from.

(05:33):
By the way, he lived onPlumb Street over there, a long long
time ago. So anyway, that'sthe story of my dad. And it
was hard, but he did beatit, and we ended up having a
better, much better relationship as hegot older, and he actually passed away
at a younger age than I Andit was that that probably was the powerful

(06:00):
shot in the arm I needed toquit smoking. He smoked a couple of
packs a day of Lucky Strikes,no filter, no nothing, and it
was his heart that gave out.And so that's where we lost him.
But back to Mother's day, Really, my mom was she was the rudder
to the ship, very patient butalso very stern with my sister and me,

(06:23):
and she let me learn a lotof things the hard way, which
I think is right. I thinkmoms and dads these days sometimes don't let
kids make mistakes that might get thema skint, knee, make mistakes that
might even break their arms. Isaw a story about that just a while
back. Kids don't break their bonesanymore because they don't get to do anything
that might break a bone, andthat's not necessarily the best way for them

(06:46):
to go through life in any event. She let me do some of that
stuff, but the serious things shedid her very best to explain explain why,
I don't know, jumping off theroof, which I did a lot,
why that wasn't such a great idea. And I did get a few
sprained ankles from doing that, butI never broke anything, so I guess
that's why I just kept doing it. And when I didn't listen to her

(07:10):
credit also, she take me tothe doctor for stitches or whatever was necessary
to keep any more common sense fromoozing out of me. I do miss
my mother, no question about it. I do, and I'm very thankful
that my son had time to reallyget to know her. And you know,
she didn't have much. Honestly,she didn't have a lot, but

(07:30):
she still found ways and found thingsthat she could get for him that always
put a smile on his face,and in turn, that made me all
the more proud that she was mymom. So hats off to her and
to your moms. Well, youknow what, we'll talk a little bit
about a little bit more about Mother'sDay when we get back from this break.
I have to do that now.I'm gonna try cal I'm gonna try
really hard to stay on time.Okay, I'm gonna do my best.

(07:54):
Kirk Holmes is the twenty twenty fourSouthern Living Builder of the Year. No
obody else can say that. It'sgonna be another year before anybody else can
stake claim to that title. Andif they keep winning awards like they do,
Kirk Combs is gonna need a muchbigger trophy case. I don't know
how big it is now, butit's gonna have to get bigger because they

(08:15):
just continue to earn accolades within theirindustry. Twenty year structural warranty is twice
the industry standard that gets some highmarks, and then they start also with
two by six exterior walls. That'sabout fifty percent more insulation around the perimeter
of that house to keep out theheat and the coal they're lated. They've

(08:35):
got a Southern Living showcase home upin Mission Ranch in College Station. They
build through all the way throughout thehill Country Austin, San Antonio, and
then all the way back this wayto northwest Houston. And every home they
build is as unique as its owner'sfingerprints. You get to pick it all
out. It's all your choices.You can get help from their architecture and
design teams, but ultimately it's aboutyou, just like Kirk Coombs, Kirkcolmbs.

(09:01):
That's kay, you are k Kirkcombsdot com. Okay, you are
K because it's all at Kirk Combs. It's all about you. What's life
without a net? I suggest yougo to bed, sleep it off,
just wait until the show's over,Sleepy. Back to Doug Pike as fifty
plus continues. What two three mysister Cale Keeth married? Yupy ju kim?

(09:35):
Alrighty? Then, gosh, whatis wrong with this microphone? Yes?
Oh it's okay. I'll handle it. I can handle it. Don't
you worry, cal I can getthis all right. Let's get back to
it here on this Friday before Mother'sDay. You know, a good many
women in this audience are mothers,even grandmothers, and I'm I'm guessing there's

(09:56):
a handful of great grandmothers listening aswell. I salute you one and all,
every one of you who brought anotherperson or persons into this world and
just did your best to raise andbe good people. And I would absume,
based on the world the way itis, at least down here in
Texas, most of you did apretty good job. I think dads are

(10:18):
mostly the strict parent, at leastwith sons especially. That's the case in
my house. I'm the guy whohas to play kind of play bad guy
and just say, look, yougot to do this or else. My
wife tends to take a softer approachto stuff, and sometimes at works,
sometimes it doesn't. I yeah,just kind of is the way it has

(10:39):
to be with me and him,because what I'm trying to do, basically
is keep him from doing all thestupid stuff I did when I was a
teenager. He doesn't have to knowthat just yet. And I think they
kind of figure kind of figure itout maybe maybe late teens, early twenties,
and by that time I will havetold my son, like most of

(11:00):
you will yours, whether you're amom or a dad, that they needed.
Don't do that. They need tonot do these things because it's not
bad. It's not good for him, it's not healthy for them. They
might get hurt and then a lightwill go off one day. Wait,
my parents know that it's bad becausethey did all that stuff, and they
probably came really close to getting beatup. Moms could be pretty tough too,

(11:22):
make no mistake when it's necessary.And I would guess that my son
probably perks up and pays closer attentionwhen my wife is upset with him in
some way, shape or form,because she tends not to get quite so
frustrated, quite so easily as Ido with some of his. Oh god,
here's a geezer term. Cow.I can't. I can't believe I'm

(11:43):
gonna say this. Shenanigans? Shewhen was let? Have you ever said
that word allowed? Have you eventhought about that word? Probably just to
imitate my father? Yes, thanks, Oh yeah, that's great. Oh
you kids in your sheigans. Ifmom's upset, there's there's usually a pretty

(12:05):
valid reason. Hopefully that makes sense. Also, you know what, I
also want to take a minute todayto address and applaud the women in this
audience who for whatever their reasons,are not mothers, and there are a
lot of reasons that some women arenot, and that's I have no problem

(12:28):
with any of those. I don'twant them to feel left out either,
because most of them make vital contributionsto this world as well. To the
women who are not mothers, thereshould be a day for you as well.
There really should be time to berecognized for your own contributions as as
aunts or nieces or friends or caregiversor confidants or or see it, whatever

(12:48):
you are. Women just women dothings differently than men as a whole,
and that that's a compliment to women, to all women. So motherhood is
what we're going to celebrate on Sunday, and I hope all of you whose
mothers are still with you, we'llcarve out the time for a very heartfelt

(13:09):
visitor phone call. And don't thinkfor a second that a two line text
is enough. Happy Mother's Day,mom, miss you. No, No,
absolutely not. That woman changed yourdiapers, she wiped your snotty nose,
she cooked meals for you, shehauled you all over town for who
knows how many years you owe her. You owe her a lot more than

(13:30):
that. Don't disappoint her again.Okay, moving on. Do I have
a little time or a lot oftime? I bet three minutes? Six?
Oh, this is a long segment. I think Will's been holding out
on me, cal I really do, because he's always cutting me off short
and telling me I got a minuteand a half when I feel like I

(13:52):
should have more. So I'll gointo this. I'll go into this.
A lengthy document was introduced as evidencethis week or this past week in a
lawsuit. And what it appears tobe, and frankly, hey, it
quacks like a duck, it walkslike a duck. It's got wings and
feathers like a duck. It appearsto be a playbook, if you will,

(14:16):
that provides these agitators and protesters andstudents, these ignorant, naive,
easily duped, gullible students, withvery specific details on how to do exactly
what they've been doing. And itinsists that these people. It's almost an
indoctrination document. But because it keepstelling them that, oh no, they're

(14:39):
not in solidarity with the cause halfwayaround the world, they're part of it.
They're a very important part of it. And a lot of that bothers
me. The document outlines the organizationof protests and other disruptions, and according
to the plaintiffs in this suit,all of which was there was this this

(15:03):
note in there somewhere that says,and we're going to start doing this on
October eighth. Hmm. It's kindof close to another important date this past
year, right the day after HAMASlaunched its attack. And what's happening on
this these campuses. It's no accidentevery day of these protests has been a

(15:26):
very well funded, well coordinated,well choreographed movement torupt, disrupt and distract
this country. It's lawmakers, it'slaw enforcers. And I'm not at all
surprised. Frankly, I wish Icould say I was surprised, but I'm

(15:46):
not really that our federal government hadn'tlifted a finger to stop it. They've
yapped about it, they've talked aboutit, but it's they're just all empty
words. On the brighter side ofthat coin. By the way, not
all Americans are willing to stand idlyby and watch this country torn down.

(16:07):
A guy in New York Man probablysomewhere, probably younger than me, I
would guess he's in his maybe earlyforties somewhere, and he turned his own
sixteen year old son over to policeafter learning that the kid had spray painted
in red spray paint gaza on aWorld War One memorial in Central Park.

(16:33):
This kid did something that defaced somethingthat should be very important to all Americans.
World War One. We lost alot of great people in that war.
World War II same way, Vietnamsame way, Korean War, same
way. And anything that is thatrecognizes the sacrifices made by all of those

(16:59):
men all the way up through today, all the fighting in the Middle East,
that that stuff should be off limitsto these little punk kids, who
half of whom don't even know whatthey're protesting. They just they just saw
a gathering, thought it was akeger, and rolled right up here.
Put this on your face, puta mask on. Oh no, it's
not a keger. We're protesting.Oh, protesting, now, that's great.

(17:23):
They don't know why, though,they don't know why, and too
many Americans I think, are kindof afraid to call all this stuff out
for what it really is. Uh, they've turned their backs to the violence
and the disrespect and intolerance kind oflong enough. Maybe that's off to that
guy had had to be very hardto turn his own son over to authorities

(17:49):
and be held accountable, and frankly, shame on anybody who would do otherwise.
There's a lot of things I couldforgive my son of doing, but
when it comes down to disrespecting thesacrifice that enables young people to do this
goofy stupid stuff. There were callsout at Columbia. The student started whining

(18:15):
about wanting to be given a freepass, a free pass on final exams
because they've been busy protesting for thelast couple of weeks. No, that's
not how it works. You wantto graduate, you want your parents' investment
in you to pay off. Thentake off your mask, open the books

(18:36):
and start well. And it's notbooks, I guess it's computers nowadays.
But get to work and study foryour exams, and when they are taken
by all the other students, youcan't neglect the fact that most of these
students are still wanting to be students, still trying to go to class.
This little fringe bunch of idiots ismaking a mess for themselves and they need

(18:59):
to just be forced to wallow intheir own mess. Just lap it up.
You want to be a protester,be a protester, and then maybe
go halfway around the world and studyat some university over there. I think
I can't remember which one it was. Some university in a country that hates
US is offering all these kids freeadmission. Go study over there. Go
see what you learn over there,Go see what your rights are over there.

(19:22):
All right, we're gonna take anotherlittle break here on the way out.
Texas home Buyers want you to knowthat if you're home in the last
week or so, got flooded byall this rising water, and you're thinking
it yourself and your family, youknow, third times a charm baby.
We've been flooded three times. We'reout of here. If only somebody would
buy our house, Texas home Buyerswill. They will come to that house.

(19:47):
They've been around for thirty five years. Better Business Bureau gives them an
A plus rating, and they willmake you an offer, usually within the
same day. Now, if theyget out there late in the afternoon,
it might take a little time.They might have to get back to you
in the morning. But essentially whatthey do is come to the house,
walk around, look around. Theydon't do anything crazy. They don't ask

(20:07):
you to do anything else to thehouse. Leave it alone. That's how
they're going to buy it exactly asyou have it right now, flooded carpet
and all, sooppy walls and all. They'll make you a very fair offer
based on it's based on what it'lltake them to get it back into condition,
or what it'll take them to cuta deal with somebody else who wants

(20:30):
to fix it up and who's willingto let them make a little profit.
They have to make a profit.That's only fair. But they are going
to give you also a very fairright now offer, and they can use
They'll pay for your closing costs too, by the way, and they can
usually get that whole deal done withintwo weeks. Boom, you got your
check. You don't ever have toworry about that thing flooding again unless you

(20:51):
move in right down the street.Don't do that, move to higher ground.
Seven one three, six, fournine twenty two twenty two seven one
three, six two twenty two.Now they sure don't make them like they
used to. That's why every fewmonths we wash them, check his fluids
and spring on a fresh coat ofwax. This is fifty plus with Doug

(21:12):
Pike. All right, welcome backfifty plus. Good heavens, what time

(21:33):
is it? Oh my gosh,is this our final segment? Cow oh
no, No, there's one more. But there's not a lot of time
in this one. I get thatright. I figured as much. Okay,
I was gonna try and leave myselfa note. I'll just do this
there. That happs. That takescare of that. All right, Welcome
back to fifty plus on this Fridayafternoon, the friday before Mother's Day.
I'm gonna ring your bell one moretime. Don't mess this up. I

(21:56):
finally I sent my wife an emailand a text this morning to make sure
she reads it. That just said, please tell us what you want.
Please. If you want to gosomewhere, tell us where you want to
go, if you want to eatsomething special, tell us what you want
to eat. If you want meto spend the entire day cleaning out the

(22:18):
garage, tell me I'll start assoon as I get home from my show.
But just tell us so we don'tmess up. Because it's I've read
way too many stories in they're waytoo true and close to home about how
difficult it is. To really figureout what moms want, and they'll tell
you, oh, you know,you should, you should know, and

(22:41):
that makes it even more difficult.You should know what I want? Well,
yeah, I should, but Idon't. So if you don't tell
me whatever it is, I'll behappy to go get it. I don't
care how much it costs. Idon't care how far I have to drive
to go get it. I'll behappy to do that. If it's not
too far, I'll send my son. He's got an car, lucky him,

(23:02):
the only new car in the family. But he's got it. And
I'm comfortable with that because I wantlike my wife and I both we want
him in something safe, something wedon't have to worry about breaking down if
he's trying to drive to a baseballtournament or a golf tournament halfway across town
somewhere this summer, and wanted tomake sure whatever he was driving wouldn't have

(23:22):
a blowout or some other failure athighway speed. So in any event,
Oh, by the way, there'ssomething interesting. I was just talking to
Cal a minute ago about prices andmoney and whatnot, and there's an ad
floating around that first appeared in nineteenand ninety five. Have you seen this

(23:44):
thing? Cal pretty interesting story.It references how prices were predicted back then
to rise between then and now,and among those predictions were Hamburgers that were
gonna cost sixteen dollars. No way, people said, no way, a
Hamburg's gonna cost sixteen dollars, Butin fact I think it's I think it's

(24:07):
Wendy's Baconator that indeed is sixteen ormore dollars. I can't remember how much
more exactly, but it's a lotof money. And the other two things
on there, I don't think theyhit as close to home. There was
a prediction of twelve thousand, fivehundred dollars for a nice summer vacation.

(24:30):
I think that's a little high.Frankly, I think you can go have
a really good time for less thantwelve five I would hope anyway. And
then the other it's you can kindof say yes or no, depending on
what your taste is. In automobiles, the prediction was that the basic car
would cost about sixty five thousand dollars. Now there are a lot of cars

(24:55):
that cost a whole lot more thanthat. I did not pay that much
for my son's new ca so thatone. Also, it's kind of like
when I'm talking to someone around hereabout how much it costs to get on
the radio and be a sponsor ofthis show or anything else. I have
clients who are invested in almost everyshow on all six of our stations,

(25:18):
and when they ask how much doesit cost, it's kind of like asking
how much is a car? Becauseit all depends on what bells and whistles
you include or don't include, howlong you want to pay for the car,
all kinds of things. The bottomline is that one's a little high.
The vacation money, I think iskind of crazy, but that's sixteen
dollars. Hamburger is here. Myson can't get out of a fast food

(25:41):
place for less than about eighteen ortwenty bucks. Now, now that'll be
a double quarter pounder at McDonald's.He's getting a double quarter pound or he's
getting like a bucket of chicken nuggetsand a chocolate shake and maybe some fries
on top of that. But itabsolutely destroys a twenty dollars bill. Here's
something else that's pretty interesting. Ifyou don't think China's gearing up for some

(26:03):
major potentially drawn out conflict. Thenask yourself why a new Chinese law requires
military training, which is already requiredby the way, in high schools and
even a lot of their middle schoolsand all of their colleges, I think
most of them anyway, No studentsexcluded for military draft either. By the

(26:26):
way, they're extending the education aboutdefending China from its enemies. That's kind
of the working title, not inEnglish, but in Chinese to elementary aged
children. China, like so manyother countries in the world too, I
found this kind of interesting that Chinastruggles with unemployment major cities, It struggles

(26:51):
with its own economy, just likeours. I don't think it's as bad
as ours, but it's certainly notgoing to lack for loyal young soldiers anytime
soon, if they're ever needed.I can't imagine why they would be.
Half of them, half of whatthey had, are over here in this
country now, just all over thecountry, thousands and thousands and thousands of

(27:11):
young Chinese men who nobody asked whyare you here? They are. I
think I heard the term twice thisweek sleeper sell When that scares the pants
off of me. It really doesthat, really bothers me. All right,
how much time do I have here? Going to go? Three minute?
Holy cow? What is the difference? What is the difference? All

(27:33):
right? Anyway, I've got stuff, I got plenty to talk about.
A major rental car company, doesn'tmatter which one charged a renter how much.
Here's a pop quiz for you.Cal Okay. This guy goes and
rents a Tesla and he drives itjust for the weekend, and he brings
it back, and the actual thecharge on the car is right about the

(27:55):
same as where he got it.And guess what they charged him because he
chose that skip the pump option.Guess what they charged to recharge that Tesla
when in fact it had about thesame charge it started with. You're gonna
love this, You're gonna hate itfor them two hundred. You're very close,
actually closer than most would come.How about to seventy seven to recharge

(28:21):
for somebody else to plug it in? Wow, not pump the gas,
Not drive it to a gas station. Actually they have their own gas stations
at these rental places. No.To seventy seven, And they did not
want to pay him back. Theguy chose that skip the pump option.
Like I said, and tried toclaim it. Since teslas don't use gas,

(28:41):
he should have been charged for anyof it fuels fuel to do that
with a gas powered car, andin California you'd probably be charged around ten
dollars a gallon, I would imagine, But that was crazy. Even the
rental company conceded that it's max rechargefor that car goes for thirty five bucks
if you didn't fill it back upall the way. Anyway, they're going

(29:03):
to give them some of that money, I think. And by the way,
that same company is in the processof dumping thirty thousand evs it has
in its fleet that had They've alreadygotten rid of ten thousand or so of
them, and they can't wait toget rid of those other twenty thousand because
it just costs too much to keepthem running. Imagine that. If rental

(29:26):
car companies can't make money off evs, how do you think it's going to
work out for you and me ifwe're forced someday to get in one of
those five company. It's not fivestates. I think it's more than that.
I want to say it's eight states. Actually, yeah, I see
it in my text here there areeight states now include California is at the

(29:48):
front. There are ten links aheadof the field on this horse race to
be first to get rid to goall electric by twenty thirty five. Rhode
Island or in Washington, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Delaware,
and Maryland also planned to ditch gascars by twenty thirty five and have absolutely
no shot at being able to provideenough electricity for people to get around,

(30:12):
especially in the wintertime. Climate controladvocates are writing and signing on to the
essentially what is going to be thefinal straw. I think if something doesn't
something else doesn't get us first,this will because we'll never get out of
a winter, We'll never get througha summer without major blackouts. Because every
time they tell people in California notto charge their cars because they need the

(30:36):
electricity because it's so hot, thefirst thing they do is charge up their
cars so they can get out oftheir house when the power goes off and
go someplace cool. It's a raceto the bottom, it really is.
Wait until California figures out that electriceighteen wheelers aren't going to work too,
Wait until a loaf of bread overthere is going for about sixteen dollars.
See how that works out. Noneof those states said a word about hydrogen

(30:59):
either, because they're all in onelectric and that's going to bite them all
on the backside. It's one electionat a time. Americans may be broken,
frustrated, and feeling a whole lotlike they swallowed a lot of lies
lately, which we have. Butwe're not stupid, and we even meaning
that the gullibles who thought Biden couldlead anyone anywhere are opening our eyes.

(31:22):
Finally, we're opening our eyes toall this hogwash. All right, I
got to take a little break hereon the way, and I'll tell you
about Texas Indoor Air Quality Specialists.I interviewed Jordan last week or was it
early this week? I think itmight have been early this week. Even
Jordan's man who owns that company,he has for twenty five years, twenty
three years, I think it isnow not twenty five yet. And all

(31:45):
they do is clean AC systems andduct work with a patented truck mounted system
that goes in there and just kindof vibrates everything out of there. It's
called a pneumatic whip, and itgoes in there and it beats the sides
of all the vent work in yourhouse without tearing it up. Mind you,

(32:05):
those harsh the brushes can tend torip and tear. This pneumatic whip
sounds like a dance from the seventies. What it does is it goes through
that duck work and knocks everything loose. At the same time that a very
powerful suction is pulling that stuff outof the vent work and out to that
truck where you'll never see it again. They clean the coils on all your

(32:27):
AC units, They clean the plenumson all your AC units, and then
methodically go from vent to vent andget all of those cleaned out. If
you have itchy eyes, if yousneeze every now and then for no reason
in your house, there's probably stuffin your duct work that may have been
there for many, many years.Get it out of there. No hidden
costs. They'll tell you before youhang up the phone with them, exactly

(32:49):
what it's going to cost based onthe number of units, the number of
vents in your house. And that'sit, two simple figures, and they
can tell you exactly what it's goingto cost to breathe cleaner, healthier air.
Those are synonymous cleaner air is healthierair. And if you haven't called
and talked to them and let themexplain the advantages of getting that done,
shame on you. You should.You got to call them. You need

(33:13):
to talk to them. You'll beso glad you did, and so will
Jordan who. By the way,if you drop my name when you call,
you get a discount, straight up, plain and simple, my name
discount at Texas Indoor Quality Specialists poundtwo point fifty dolls pound two point fifty
And when the prompt comes up,just say healthy air and you will be
connected directly to their offices and theycan help you get started on breathing cleaner,

(33:38):
healthier air for many, many yearsto come aged to perfection. This
is fifty plus with Dougpike. Allright, welcome back. Fifty plus.

(34:06):
Final segment is here and where wehad oh yeah, well just a few
minutes right, that's okay. Iwas talking to who Col during the break
about some of the things my momput up with in my early childhood.
And by the way, she wasshe was one of those moms who wanted
me back home when the street lightscame on and it was like a warning.

(34:27):
It was almost like an air raidsiren. My mother could whistle so
loudly that I could hear it literallya block away, literally a block and
just as it was about time,when dinner was ready or almost ready,
she would stand on that front porchand hit that air raid siren whistle of
hers and Buddy, my sister andI would come a running around the corner,

(34:52):
hoping a fence. Whatever it took, I got home really really quick,
and it wasn't in hindsight, therewas no real penalty, I don't
think for being super Not a littlea little late was okay. If I
had to come home after dark,that would have been a problem. But
yeah, she could get our attentionfrom a very long distance. And as

(35:12):
I told Cal, before I waseven ten, well before I was eleven.
Certainly we moved away briefly when Iwas ten for a job transfer for
my dad, but before I wasten, she'd already had to take me
to the doctor for stitches three timesso and twice full transparency for Rock Wars,

(35:34):
I was very enthusiastic throwing. Iwanted to keep throwing and keep throwing,
and the only way you could dothat would be to keep looking down
to pick up more rocks and notpaying attention to incoming and square to the
top of the head, and assoon as you felt it back then you
kind of knit. Well. Thesecond time I knew. The first time

(35:54):
thought wow that hurts, and Iput my hand up there, and I
said, wow, that hurts,and it's wet. What's going on?
Sure enough, the head wound justbleed horribly. The second time, I
didn't even have to put my handup there. I just took my t
shirt off and put it against myhead and walked home and just said,
Mom, she goes, I'll getthe keys, like, oh, she

(36:16):
knew, and my doctor they allknew me. I was given the chance.
I was given the opportunity which somany kids don't get these days,
given the opportunity to get dinged up, live through it, and learn from
it. And I wish I wishmore parents would do that today with their

(36:37):
kids. But that's not what thisweekend's about. This weekend is about Mom.
It's about taking care of her andacknowledging her and making sure that for
at least just this one day,she is acknowledged, admired, respected,
loved, and given all the accoladesfor getting our sorry behinds this far down

(37:04):
the road. If you know what, if you're a mom and you don't
have anybody, you don't think anybody'sgonna call you, let me know.
Maybe I'll give you a call onSonday. Who knows. I gotta be
taking care of my wife now,So don't don't fault me if you don't
get the call for another day orso. But yeah, i'd certainly at
least send you a little text ifyou want that. And I know that's

(37:24):
not right for your own family todo to you, But depending on how
many of these things I get,I'd be happy to make just make somebody's
day a little bit brighter. Nota lot, it's total stranger I am,
but a little bit brighter anyway.All Right, we are rapidly approaching
Oh gosh, I didn't get anyof this good stuff. How much?

(37:45):
Thirty seconds? None? Twenty Okay, I'll give you this with thirty four
year old woman in Michigan found livinginside a grocery source stiin on the roof
of the building. She has ajob, she has a vehicle. She
been there a year, with adesk and flooring and even a houseplant.

(38:05):
Living in a sign. We gottago. I'll be back next Tuesday.
Thank you all so much. HappyMother's Day, idios.
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