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May 7, 2024 36 mins
Today, Doug Pike interviews Dr. Angela Goins about transporting the elderly.  Pike also speaks with Jordan Lera of Texas IAQ Specialists.
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(00:01):
Remember when it was impossible to misplacethe TV remote because you were the TV
remote. Remember when music sounded likethis? You remember when social media was
truly social? Hey John, how'sit going today? Well, this show
is all about you. This isfifty plus with Doug Pike, helpful information

(00:28):
on your finances, good health,and what to do for fun. Fifty
plus brought to you by the UTHealth Houston Institute on Aging Informed Decisions for
a healthier, happier life and byTexas Indoor Air Quality Specialists because clean air
is healthier air. And now fiftyplus with Doug Pike. Tuesday edition of

(00:51):
the program starts right now. Thankyou all for listening on this is it's
kind of a cloudy day. Howwell, it's not certainly not blue sky
out there. Yeah, it wasnot even a patch. I know,
it's just solid clouds. Again,at least it's not rainy. Let's just
go with that. And after whatwe went through this past week, especially

(01:14):
up on the North Side where FEMAI think has finally come down and decided
to start counting what was lost andcome up with a figure for this one.
Like they just love to do,They love to come out of here
and add up all the damage andput this one in the books and move
on and wait for the next one. I don't know, it's it's almost

(01:36):
morbid the way they just want tofind out how much damage was done.
How about you just come down herewith a bunch of people and help out
mop some stuff up and move somedebris out of the way off the road
so that people can get back intotheir homes. Don't guess that's really dawned
on anybody. On a totally differentnote, I was ask to and did

(01:59):
pretin payed in a charity golf tournamentyesterday with my old buddy Joe Cesarado.
He worked here for a long time, and I've known the guy a long
time, and we had a blastand it was fun. For the first
time in a very long time,I was asked to play on a team
where we walked onto the golf courseknowing full well that we weren't gonna win

(02:22):
anything. Really, we weren't gonnawin the whole tournament, not by a
long shot at our ages. Nobodyin the group was gonna win the long
drive contest on that whole By theway, quick footnote, I had a
pretty I had a pretty good oneout there, felt pretty comfortable and confident.
Got down there and the long drive, little post with somebody's name on

(02:46):
it. I didn't even look tosee whose name was on it. I
wouldn't have recognized it. Maybe itmight have been somebody I know's son or
grandson. But that that ball endedeighty yards past word of mine was a
smooth eighty yards and I didn't Ididn't really miss mine. In any event,
it was fun. We had agood time. If we could have

(03:07):
putted, we might have actually beensomewhere near the middle of the pack.
But we just couldn't make a puttfallall day. So we hummed around and
had a good time, just exactlywhat we went out there to do.
Thank you all for joining me today. We the generations that well, just

(03:27):
genuinely hope some people, younger peoplesomeday will will wake up to what we
went through and got through so thatthey could be doing whatever it is they're
doing, be that protesting or demandingthis or insisting that we do that on

(03:47):
their behalf. All the things weexperienced and got through and handed them pretty
much on a silver platter, anopportunity to take the ball and run with
it, and they just let theair out of the ball. I'm probably
somewhere near middle age wise, Iguess in this audience, middle of the
pack. And I grew up whenalmost everyone's dad had served in World War

(04:10):
iiO of the Korean War, whensome of our school friends, high school
friends were being shipped off to Vietnamand some of them weren't coming back.
We have experienced things that these kidsfortunately have not had to go through,
not to any great degree anyway,not like we did. And I just

(04:31):
hope history doesn't repeat itself, atleast in my time. I want to
get my son old enough to fendfor himself and know how to do it,
and at some point I'll pass thebaton to him and just let him
go on and carve his own waythrough the world. Market's doing virtually nothing,
all of them green, but insignificantlyso Gold. Thanks to Houston gooldexchange

(04:56):
dot com once again, Gold wasat twenty three hundred and twenty one dollars
an ounce. That's not twenty fourhundred, but it's not chicken feed either.
That's a pretty good amount of moneyfor an ounce a go and I
still haven't done it yet. ButI'm determined. It's kind of like cleaning
out my garage. I'm determined togo gather up all that stuff that's just

(05:17):
collecting dust and not sparkling in thesunlight, and see what I can get
for it and take it onto somenewsy bits and pieces. It has just
been announced that the Boy Scouts ofAmerica, which have dealt with bankruptcy,
of laid and accusations of sexual assaults, it's having a rough go and they've

(05:41):
decided that to fix it, torite the ship. After one hundred and
fourteen years as the Boy Scouts ofAmerica, they're changing their name to Scouting
America, which the story I sawsays the Scouts they want to be more
inclusive and more power to them.I guess somebody here wondered if they're changing

(06:01):
Eagle Scouts to Peacocks Scouts. Idon't know. Hollywood, there's someplace else
where. There's a little bit ofuncertainty in the air. Hollywood's all in
position on inclusivity is costing filmmakers dearlyby the millions and tens of millions and

(06:25):
more. Box office takes down dramaticallyas more and more potential theater goers turn,
for whatever their reasons, to othermedia, and I bet to stories
that just don't force any specific ideologiesdown their throats. There was one story
I can't remember the film, oneof these films that embraces all that is

(06:48):
liberal and left. One of thosefilms opened in two thousand theaters, more
than two thousand theaters, it saidrecently. And in opening we took in
two million dollars. That's a thousanddollars theater on a big nationwide opening.

(07:09):
That's not a lot of money.That is not a lot of money.
How at UCLA protests seem to bewinding down a little bit. That's good.
Something else being discussed out there now, though, that troubles me even
more than screaming and hollering teenagers.All of them are wearing masks, by
the way, because they don't wantanybody to know who they are. You

(07:30):
know what, I'll hold this one. Well, I know we need to
get going here and get to thisbreak. So what I'm going to do
is hold this because there's another onethat kind of tags along to that one,
and I want to make sure wecan get them both in. So
on the way out here, I'lltell you about a Late Health. This
is my doctor, Andrew Doe andhis staff his team at these locations around

(07:53):
town. They're a vascular clinic.And by that what I mean is that
they will. For example, oneof the procedures they do most often is
called prostate artery embolization, where theygo in for someone who is experiencing the
dreadful symptoms of an enlarged, noncancerous prostate. It's not cancer, that's
the good news. The bad newsis it packs a lot of baggage that

(08:16):
doesn't make it comfortable to be aman anymore. If your prostate's doing that
getting keeping you from getting a goodnight's sleep, you're up going to the
bathroom all the time. Whatever thesymptoms for you, you can make them
go away. With a couple ofhours in the offices at a late health
they will identify the artery that istreating or that is serving that prostate,

(08:37):
and then they'll shut it off.They'll just turn the knob and turn off
the blood supply. It's not reallywhat it sounds like or looks like,
but yeah, they make it stopand with it. When it stops,
it goes away, and so dothe symptoms. They can do the same
for women and they're fibroids. Theycan do the same for ugly veins on
anybody who wants to show up withthem and make them go away. And

(08:58):
they do other things as well,most of which is covered by Medicare and
Medicaid seven one three, five eight, eight thirty eight eighty eight. Seven
one three, five eight eight thirtyeight eighty eight. Also doing a lot
of regenerative medicine right now, whichis great for anybody who suffers from chronic
pain. A latehealth dot com al a t E A latehealth dot com

(09:20):
once life without a Net, Isuggest you go to bed, sleep it
off. Just wait until the show'sover. Sleepy. Back to Doug Pike
as fifty plus continues. All right, welcome back, Thank you for listening

(09:41):
fifty plus here on a pretty cloudytuesday, not so bad outside though not
raining anymore. Thank goodness for everybody. Thanks for sharing your lunch hour.
We'll talk in this segment about transportationfor seniors. Comes a time in most
of our lives, if not yetsomeday, when a family member or somebody

(10:01):
else who really cares about us isgoing to walk up and recommend that you
hand off the keys. Which inan instant just renders us a little confused,
little frightened, wondering how we're goingto get where we have to go.
And to help with all that,I'm going to welcome in doctor Angela
Goins, Assistant Professor of social Workunder the University of Houston Downtown and a

(10:22):
licensed social worker, says nineteen andninety six, and I'm guessing she can
answer all my questions. Welcome aboard. First of all, doctor, thank
you, thank you for having me. And I hope I can't answer all
your questions. Trust me, it'llbe easy for you. Does anyone really
have a solid handle on the numbersor percentages of seniors who don't have access

(10:43):
to any time transportation? Well,I know that there was a poll by
the National Aging Disability Transportation Center thatsaid like forty percent of older adults felt
that the access to like public transportationwas hindered because it's just very difficult.
I mean, it's not you know, most public transportations unfortunately aren't adapted for
the needs of a senior. Andso you know, forty percent, that's

(11:07):
a lot, but definitely, youknow, ninety percent of older adults age
in place, which means they livein their home, so they're going to
need some kind of transportation, andthat kind of falls on their caregivers.
You know. ARP said that seventyeight percent of caregivers arrange transportation for their
older loved ones. So it's it'sa huge issue as we age in place,

(11:28):
you know, and when those keysdo get taken away, it even
complicates matters. Yeah, I wasthinking while you while you were answering that
question about somebody who is older andmaybe lives somebody would look at them and
say, well, lives right onthe bus line. Always got to do
is get to the bus stop.But if you've got bad hips, if
you've got the balance problems, thatbus stop might as well be ten miles

(11:50):
away. Yeah, those are someof the factors that come up. Yeah,
you know, if people have physicallimitations, you know, they can't
sit for long periods of time.And then if they do public transportation,
you know, they've got to holdon to things, and they may have
to bring their walker and their caneand they're navigating all of that. So
yeah, they can't walk long distances. And I think there's a little bit

(12:13):
of a pride factor as well.You don't want to have to do all
that to get on the bus,and you feel like you're making everybody wait
just for you. That would botherme a little bit, I guess I
don't think. I don't honestly,I don't think people would be so put
off by it as the person who'shaving to do it, thinking that,
oh gosh, I'm just holding thewhole bus up here. Let me ask

(12:33):
you this, around what age wouldyou say seniors these days are finally just
giving up the keys and taking theother way. So, you know,
there's some research on that. There'sno particular age, but usually there is,
you know, when there starts tocome like cognitive or mental decline,
where you know they're driving in theirown cars, they're getting lost, they're

(12:54):
forgetting the directions to places that theyused to know by heart. Usually that's
a telltale sign that that they haveto give up the keys. And that's
a very hard conversation. I hadto have that with Daud and it was
very difficult. But he was startingto develop dementia and he couldn't tell me
where he went, you know,And so it's definitely kind of hard,
you know, because people still wantto be involved and they want to go

(13:16):
to the grocery store and church andto all those places that are important to
them, and that gets limited becauseof physical decline. And so there really
isn't an age. But tell usuallywhen the mental starts going, that's usually
a time where they for their safetyand for the safety of others, that
you have that conversation. Twenty I'dsay fifteen twenty years ago, this might

(13:37):
have been a more difficult conversation tohave and have fewer solutions, certainly with
the ride share programs, with fooddeliveries and all. If you have the
money that has to help, doesn'tit It does help. But you got
to remember a lot of seniors onsixth incomes and so you know the part
of that that limited income is nowgoing towards transportation. But you know,

(14:00):
there are some programs that give discounts. There are some programs that provide free
transportation here and here in Houston,and so they're you know, luckily,
we're getting more conscious and more educatedabout this need that seniors have with transportation.
I know that like Lyft and Ubernow they because a lot of seniors

(14:22):
aren't really good with technology or theapps on their phone. So Uber and
Lyft now has like a main numberthat they can call and they and it's
not as much, but you know, there's stuff to pay a little bit.
Sure, I would love to seeone of these ride share companies go
ahead and come up with a programwhere for every say, for every five
or every ten rides they book,they hand a free ride to a doctor's

(14:48):
appointment to a senior. That wouldbe lovely. Oh my gosh. Yes,
we need to advocate for that,because that's just it's one. It's
a problem. You know, there'snot enough access or resources for this for
the seniors. And I would I'dpay a couple of extra bucks for that.
If I knew that I would doit was donating to somebody who desperately
needs a ride to the doctor onThursday afternoon, and my ride with that

(15:11):
company would help that person get there. I'd be all over that. I
wish our tax paid money can goto that. Yeah, that would be
great, that's a great idea.Uh. There's actually the Texas Silver Haired
Legislators and they lobby for older adultsand policies and needs of older adults,
and so they're definitely one area.You know, you can always call them
and say, hey, you know, we need more transportation in this area.

(15:35):
What can y'all do you to kindof advocate on in like a policy
level, you know, Yeah,talk about the impact on quality of life
too. For somebody who can't theycan't go visit their friends when they feel
like it, they can't go tothe grocery store when they feel like it.
They just can't do anything socially whenthey feel out like it without relying
on somebody else. Yeah, Sowhen you talk about, you know,

(15:58):
the impact the quality of life whensomeone loses or gains access, it's like
the difference between night and day theydrive. You know, to drive gives
you freedom and independence, and whenone loses that ability to drive or have
access to transportation, they really loseboth their independence and their freedom. And
so on the flip side of that, if they have access to transportation,
that opens the door to many opportunities. Recreation, socialization helps seniors feel less

(16:23):
isolated and alone, but it canalso the negative thing of not having access
to transportation is healthcare outcomes. Youknow, if they can't get to their
doctor's appointment, that could have avery negative impact on their ability to just
live from day to day. Soit creates challenges for them and also you
know, for their caregivers who aretrying to get them to their appointments,

(16:47):
and so it really it not onlyimpacts the senior but their family as well.
But it can have good It canhave good I guess impacts if they
have access to it, getive outcomesas well, which is kind of sad.
Doctor Angel Goin's on fifty plus.We are down to just seconds,
believe it or not. This one'sso fast. Talk about real quickly about

(17:07):
if somebody lives farther from the cityto how much more difficult it is for
them to find everything, find toride. Well. You know, in
rural areas there's typically the phone coverageout there is poor, and so trying
to call and get something set upcould be a problem. Structural barriers.
You know, fewer public transportation optionsout in rural areas, and a lot

(17:29):
of seniors live out in the ruralareas. There's a greater percentage living out
there than like in urban areas.So definitely a lot of issues and challenges
when they live further out. Andyou know, you know, when I
do my social work with people inthe field and I go to their homes.
That is the number one thing theysay have problems with is affordable transportation
and accessible and adaptable. You know, a lot of the places aren't really

(17:52):
built for seniors, which is reallya shame. Yeah, we move out
to the country for a country place, and we can't get to and from
it. I've got to go.I'm so sorry, doctor Angela going.
Thank you very much. I reallyappreciate this. Thank you very much.
Well, Bobby, all right,we gotta take a little break here.
On the way out, I willtell you about Primo doors. And I'm

(18:15):
just we're knocking on the door,so to speak. My wife and I
on getting installation of our new door, and I can't wait. I know
it's gonna beautiful. She my wifesent the pictures of it to her sister,
and her sister loved it, andwe're gonna love it, and I
can't wait to get it on it. I'm gonna check with Jason see if
we can tie installation in somehow toMother's Day a little bit. If you

(18:38):
are interested in a front door toupgrade the look of your home, which
it will do the minute it's installed. Unless I mean, boy, my
house didn't look bad, but nowthat I see what that door is gonna
do for it. I love it, I really do. I'm very happy
with what we picked out. Andit wasn't an easy process. They have
thousands of selections, thousands of differentdoors, wood, iron, and fiberglass.

(19:02):
They have thousands of handle sets andstain options, and it just it
can seem overwhelming until you get tothe showroom and sit down with somebody who
has been doing this for the company'sbeen around for more than ten years,
and Jason himself, the owner,has been in the door business for twenty
plus years right here in Houston.They know, after talking to you for

(19:26):
a little while, kind of whatyou're looking for, so they can help
you whittle it down to just maybefrom thousands to a dozen, then from
a dozen to half a dozen,and then you and your family can sit
there and say, you know whatthis one. We want this door,
we want that stain, we wantthat handle set, and let's get started.
And that's exactly what we did whenmy wife and I went over there,

(19:48):
and we are thrilled to death withthe selection. Can't wait. You
got tax refund coming in, yougot that front door just waiting for you.
Mother's Day Mother's Day at the endof the week. If you get
over there and get in there andwork a deal, Jason's promised me he
will work with you for a nicelittle Mother's Day present. Take something off

(20:10):
mention my name, and he'll takea significant amount. It's gonna save you
hundreds of dollars. So I'm justgonna tell you that premodoors dot Com is
the website, family owned and operated, always has been primodors dot Com aged
to perfection. This is fifty pluswith Dougpike. All right, welcome back

(20:42):
fifty plus. We're on KPRC ona cloudy It's not horrible. It's a
nice day outside, warm and muggy, and that humidity's gonna linger, I
think forever. Not many of usget to our ages with no sneezes,
watery eyes, and just healthy asa horse all the way through. But

(21:03):
straight up, some of us aredealing with those things. We blame allergies,
we blame the cat whatever. It'snot always the case. Some of
this stuff is because we're not takingcare of the air we breathe at home.
And to make that make sense,I'm gonna bring in Jordan Learra,
owner for more than two decades ofTexas indoor air quality specialists. Thanks for

(21:25):
helping me sort this out. Ineed your help with this, Jordan.
Not a problem, Doug. I'mhere to help you good. So I
want to share details about how theAC systems kind of filter the air but
don't necessarily pick off all the contaminantsand all the allergies before they get into
that duck work and I guess ultimatelyinto our noses. You've been at this

(21:45):
a long time for somebody hadn't hadtheir duckwork cleaned. And I don't know
how long, five, ten,twenty years, how much stuff is probably
up in those vents and getting spitback into the house when we turn on
the AC, well, Doug,it certainly can be considerable amounts. You
have to also be aware of thisis that air filters were originally designed to

(22:11):
keep the equipment itself clean, notnecessarily to clean the air for the occupants
of the house or the commercial officebuilding. So filters were originally designed for
keeping the mechanical equipment clean. Nowit's just like anything out there these days.
There are really good filters and thereare really cheat not so good filters.

(22:37):
So the more that you can spendon an air filter for your air
conditioning system. It's not only goingto benefit the mechanical system itself, but
also the occupants of the space thatthat mechanical system serves. That's fair.
Yeah, that's interesting. I've hadsome people tell me that if you buy
those super fancy catching all filters attwenty five bucks a pop, they actually

(23:03):
draw harder on your system. Isthat true or no? It can be,
But the new technology and new generationsof those have really developed lower air
resistance, better filter to reduce thatincidence or that problem of occurring. Yeah.
I'm glad to hear that, becausenow I'm gonna have to start investing
in more expensive filters. And I'lldo it, man. I really will

(23:26):
talk about how just how much gunkand goo and dust gets dragged out of
an average homes duct work by yourguests. And that's a good question,
Doug. It really all depends onwhat type of filtration has been used,
how well the system has been maintainedand cleaned, which should be on a

(23:48):
regular biannual basis with your AC contractora spring cleaning or checkup and a fall
cleaning or checkup. But the moreimportant determining factor of what's inside the system
is what goes on in the house. Yeah, and what type of amenities
are in the house. If youhave a bunch of shag carpet and cotton

(24:11):
draprees as opposed to wood or hardwoodfloors and many blinds and fewer fewer pets,
fewer children, the type of activitythat goes on to the inside the
house really can contribute to the amountof debris that gets airborne and then suck

(24:34):
back to the system, hopefully filteredout, but more often than not does
not get filtered out. I hadn'teven thought of all this stuff. Man.
See, this is why I needsyou. This is why I need
you on the air with me here. So, by the way, real
quickly, can you recall any likea worst case example where your guys came
back and said, holy cow,you won't believe what we found in this
guy's duct work. Well, it'snot uncommon in older places for us to

(25:00):
find treasures left behind by not sonot so carrying AC contractors the bad name
because as you know, I amone, but I only have the AC
license so I can clean ducks professionally. But sometimes we'll find a small whiskey

(25:26):
bottle, beer can, oh wow, potato chip bag, something that would
something they thought would be funny.In fact, I've got quite a collection
of old ten beer cans oh wowthat have come out of AC system.
That's crazy, I ever thought aboutthat. But more often than not,

(25:52):
what happens in an AC system isbecause there are so many porous portions,
like in the pleneum that the duckworkattached to. That's a porous media,
and because it's dark and damp anddirty in there, really bad things can
start growing and that needs to beaddressed and rectified sooner than later. The

(26:14):
other thing is the type of dunkwork that is common in this area is
duct board or a fiberglass material thatcan really get nasty, and we like
to get that cleaned up and thenencapsulated or paint it. Talk about the
system your crews use and why it'sbetter than what some of these other guys
are used out there when it's paintedon the side of the truck. Yeah,

(26:37):
we clean ductwork too, right,And that's a really good point.
We use a patented proprietary truck mountedsystem that is extremely uh extremely well suited
for cleaning air ducts. And infact, that's all all it's made for.

(27:00):
We can pull about two or threetimes the amount of air through your
AC system that it is normally pushingthrough. In other words, when we
put that truck, attach that truckto your AC system, we control the
amount of vacuum we put on itso that we effectively pull everything out of

(27:22):
your system that we stir up withour pneumatic whip system. Wow. That
does two things. Number one,it effectively gets all the jumps out of
your house and back to our truck. And number two, it does not
allow a bunch of dirt, debrisand trash to come back into your house

(27:45):
after we leave. That's a goodpoint. You don't just stir it up
and then it just settles back.When settles back down to the bottom,
that's that's got to be helpful.And to your point on that too,
Doug. You know, and we'vetalked about this before, it takes between
eight and ten man hours to aprofessionally one air conditioning system. Wow.

(28:07):
We always send at least two techniciansto do that, so the on site
time is between four and five hours. But we are very thorough and make
sure we leave that system as cleanas it can possibly be without being new,
so that when the homeowner gets backthere's not a clump of dust on

(28:27):
the carpet or on their bedroom duvetcover, or on their kitchen. We
make sure we don't get any callbacks. That's good, man, it's so
good. Believe it or not.We're out of time. I'm gonna have
to I got about a bunch morequestions I'm gonna have to get you back
on in a relatively short amount oftime. If you are looking for Jordan,
if you want to get your cleanerair going through your house, like

(28:48):
I'm telling you you really, ifyou want to live a long time,
breathe cleaner air. That'll be agood start. Now, pound two to
fifty pound two fifty and then whenit asks you for the prompt, say
cleaner. That's all you've got todo. Pound two to fifty cleaner air.
Jordan, thanks so much for yourtime, buddy, glad to help.
Yes, Sir, Texas Indoor AirQuality Specialist. Pound two fifty cleaner

(29:11):
air, and believe me, it'llwork all right. We got to take
a little break here. On theway out, I will tell you all
about ut Health Institute on aging.This is where you can go either starting
at the website or go to seeone of the providers listed there to make
sure that you are getting care thatis designed specifically for seniors. They're doctors

(29:36):
all over town. There are therapistsall over town, trainers all over town,
nurse practitioners all over town. Butthere is also this collective, this
collaboration of them, hundreds of themwho have said, yes, we want
to go ahead and get some additionaltraining in our specific fields as they apply

(29:56):
to seniors. It's a fantas pasticopportunity, a fantastic opportunity for you to
be seen by somebody who knows moreabout you than you know about yourself.
These are all these different providers.They help seniors, and it's not all
they do, but it's what theydo best. All around town, mostly

(30:17):
in the medical center. That's wherethey kind of start. That's the hub,
if you will, like it isfor most of medicine here in Houston,
but they also practice in outlying areas. Almost all of them spend some
time out on the outskirts of town, outskirts of Houston anyway, in the
bigger areas, and they would behappy to see you there. As well.
Go to the website. Look atall the resources available, look at

(30:38):
all the opportunities for care, opportunitiesfor socialism. They all these things,
or at this one website just forseniors. Ut dot edu slash aging,
uth dot edu slash aging. Nowthey sure don't make them like they used
to. That's why every few monthswe wash them, check his fluids and

(31:00):
in the spring on a fresh coatof wax. This is fifty plus with
Doug Pike. All right, welcomeback, rounding third and headed home on

(31:27):
fifty plus. This. You know, it looks I don't know if it's
just me, Willard. It looksa little bit brighter, maybe still cloudy.
It does look a little brighter,doesn't it, Because we if nothing
else will, we know our lumens. We can judge light, I think,
and I think this is brighter thanit was when we started, not
a lot. You have to havevery sensitive eyes and a very keen a

(31:51):
keen perception to see things that wesee. Oh yeah, would you agree?
I definitely think so. All right, let me get back to little
bit of news. Then we'll havesome fun at the end of the rack.
Here the thing that bothered me thatI saw from out at UCLA,
where more than the hollering teenagers likeI was saying earlier from the Daily Wire

(32:12):
comes the story of an incredible bravadoand deception amongst one of that school's staff.
It's all true, and according tothis story from back on April twenty
second, actually, the school's DEIprogram leader is said to have plucked and
pasted significant chunks of text from asmany as ten other authors and inserted them

(32:37):
almost verbatim and without citation, intoa twenty twenty fourteen or twenty fourteen work
under her own name on why collegesshould create larger DEI programs. So she
runs the department, she is headof the class in that, and she

(32:58):
kind of pulled stuff out of everybodyelse's stuff. I have a problem with
that. Another problem I have iswith the whining going on at least one
Arizona State student, a senior whowas arrested and suspended for trespassing during recent
antie Israel protests. She also missedgraduation as a consequence of her actions.

(33:21):
Play stupid games, as the sayinggoes, and wins stupid prizes. If
only these poor I don't know,not poor gullible students. They're just gulible
students. They're being led astray byvery well trained agitators who are adults and
have absolutely nothing to lose here.There's not a single one of these professional,

(33:42):
well paid agitators who's gonna miss anexam and not make graduation because of
what they're doing. But these kids, these kids are being they're just pawns.
And the people telling them to protestdon't care at all about it.
And those of us who have beentrying to tell these kids that for what
a couple of three weeks now maybea month, they don't want to listen

(34:07):
to us. They don't how muchtime do you have? Will three minutes?
You have two and a half.Let's shift off of the real quickly.
Planet Fitness under scrutiny right now forchanging his policies to allow transgender men
into women's locker rooms. One ofthe company founders actually said, he feels
like current policies just absolutely destroyed whathe worked so hard to build. He's

(34:29):
got a daughter, He's got adaughter, and that what the new policy
at Planet Fitness not under his eyeanymore, bothers him in that regard.
What's wrong with these people, up, up and away or no headline,
will no headline. According to research, thirty eight percent of Americans say they

(34:53):
have never felt more what will?It's a it's an emotion that you might
feel, never felt thirty six percentof Americans. That is correct, I
think thirty eight thirty eight percent?Everything does it? Yeah? Thirty eight
percent of Americans never never felt moresad? You probably warm, never felt

(35:16):
more uninspired at work? Oh?Do you feel uninspired all the time?
I don't know that I feel uninspired. I don't. I don't really.
I enjoy what I do though.See, that's the thing. I got
into this, the business that I'min, originally in writing about the outdoors,
which was a passion. I didthat for twenty three years, and

(35:37):
then with great overlap, I addedgolf to that, and then coming to
radio, also with overlap, andediting a magazine for ten years, also
with overlap, I wound up whereI am now, with an opportunity to
talk about things that matter to seniors, that matter to us, And for
that I'm very grateful, And Idon't mind coming in here every day and

(35:59):
doing this job. All right,real quick, more the merrier, or
you don't have to be smart toget rich. You don't got to be
smart to get bitcoin. Trader gotscammed. He got scammed and lost seventy
million dollars. Oh wow, seventymillion. You don't have to be smart
to get rich, but you gottabe smart to stay rich, at least

(36:22):
not be a boy. Yeah that'sa big isn't it. Seventy mili gone
baby gone, gone, gone,up, up and away. Speaking of
gone, stuff that was once hypedhis next big things Google plus three,
dtvs NFTs and what do you think? Will you want to throw one on

(36:43):
the list. That's something that wasgoing to be really cool. Oh,
I got it, I go nosegways. We'll be back tomorrow. Thanks
for listening. Audios
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