All Episodes

April 3, 2024 22 mins

Step into a world where gratitude is the cornerstone of a life well-lived and genuine connections are just a click away.

In this episode of 10 Minute Marketing, founder of The Human Experience Experiment, Kyion Isaac, describes how she channeled her own experiences of loss into the creation of T.H.E.E. -- a platform that encourages gratitude and human connection to nurture personal growth. Sonja and Kyion discuss the heartbeat of T.H.E.E., a 7-day journey designed to unlock the business and life potential within by facilitating deep self-reflection and fostering a supportive digital community.

By deciding to use WhatsApp, Kyion has created a Gratitude Group, a network and community of individuals who can connect away from the typical norms of social media. She details how the group is flourishing organically as members invite friends. As the group has expanded, she also discusses how the demand for sharing her gifts has risen and how she's been able to build a sustainable business model. 

Throughout their discussion, Kyion shares words of wisdom about utilizing one's gifts, finding one's stride as a leader and human being, and unlocking the power of discipline for life and business.

After listening to the episode, check out Kyion's "Self-Help Check List" for 2024 and more resources by joining the T.H.E.E. Community for free!

About Kyion Isaac and The Human Experience Experiment
Kyion Isaac, PMP is an accomplished entrepreneur who is a certified project manager, business lifestyle advisor and the ultimate people connector. With over 15 years of experience, Kyion has advised numerous Fortune 500 companies on strategic planning, market expansion, and organizational development. Her expertise lies in developing cutting edge insights to identify opportunities, streamline operations, and deliver game-changing results.

Kyion started her corporate career, working for companies like Gap Inc. and the Kimberly Clark Corporation, where she led and implemented multiple multimillion dollar initiatives that delivered exponential revenue growth and expense reductions. Kyion’s visionary perspective has earned her opportunities to produce stellar results for industry-leading companies such as BMW, Wells Fargo, Hillshire Farm, American Cancer Society, Amtrak, Ford and United Airlines. During this time, Kyion discovered her passion for guiding people to discover their untapped potential.

While building her own brand, Kyion quickly learned early-stage entrepreneurship is anything but easy. She decided to take what she learned and help guide others that were on similar journeys. Her desire and dedication for garnering solutions led her to guide the paths of small businesses, independent consultants, and political officials. Kyion’s intuition and acuity helped her clients gain exponential market growth through brand redevelopment and achieve record-breaking revenue increases with cost reductions.

Based in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area, Kyion continues to serve clients domestically and abroad. With years of experience, she strives to support early-stage growth companies by leveraging her knowledge and extensive network.
 
Kyion holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting from Alabama State University and is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Outside of work, Kyion lives by the motto: “Water does not resist and neither should you.” From sky-diving to raising her two beautiful children, Kyion enjoys taking full advantage of the adventures life brings.

Learn more about The Human Experience Experiment and follow Kyion on Instagram.

Mark as Played
Transcript

Episode Transcript

Available transcripts are automatically generated. Complete accuracy is not guaranteed.
Sonja Crystal Williams (00:06):
Hi everyone, I'm Sonja Crystal
Williams and welcome to today'sepisode of 10 Minute Marketing.
So joining me today I have justsomeone so close to me that
I've known for many years, mysister-in-law, who's just an
amazing and prominentbusinesswoman.
She is a project manager, sheis a lifestyle expert.

(00:26):
She's just so many things.
Kyion Isaac, welcome to 10Minute Marketing, thank you.
Thank you.
I'm so excited about this.
So, I asked you to come todaybecause you've been working on a
very personal project.
That I think is pretty amazingand, as many of you know, if
you've been listening to thepast few episodes, we've been

(00:48):
talking a lot this season aboutcommunity and the importance of
building community as you'rebuilding brands, what it means
to build community and the factthat even that word community
looks different, or might evenslightly mean something
different, to a lot of differentbusiness owners or people that

(01:09):
are growing and managing onlinecommunities in some way, shape
or form.
Kyion is founder of T.
H.
E.
E.
and Kyion, I'm going to turn itover to you to kind of share
with everyone what T.
H.
E.
E.
is and talk a little bit moreabout it.

Kyion Isaac (01:22):
I appreciate that.
So T.
H.
E.
E.
stands for The Human ExperienceExperiment and it's rooted in
community.
It's really rooted in we allhave this human experience and I
believe we're humans, we'respirits having a human
experience, and so the wholething about it is you kind of
have sometimes people focus somuch on the spiritual side.
But my part is to how do youconverge those two so that you

(01:45):
actually improve your humanexperience?
And so this is all about how doI, wherever I'm at right now,
how do I take it to the nextlevel, how do I take this
baseline aybe I'm not happy,maybe I'm stuck, maybe I want to
change something and how do Ikind of go within myself,
discover my best self and thenstart to make decisions that
give me the outcomes that I want?

(02:07):
And that is the it's about theexperiment.
If I just tap in a little bitto this human experience, what
could I really do if I kind ofbalance those two sides out.

Sonja Crystal Williams (02:16):
Yeah, what could I uncover if I went a
step further or explored alittle bit more?
And this is not just foreveryone listening, this is not
just applying to where you'regoing in your business or your
career.
This is everything, becauseanything we do in life is part
of an experience, right?

Kyion Isaac (02:36):
This, right now, what we're doing is an
experience.
The fact that I get theopportunity to be on your
podcast and have this experiencewith you, opportunity to be on
your podcast and have thisexperience with you, like this
is.
.
.
I cherish this, but it's alsobecause you made the decision
that this is what you want to dowith your amazing gift, and so
now we get to have this.

Sonja Crystal Willia (02:54):
Absolutely .
What was the inspiration behindstarting T.
H.
E.
E.
?

Kyion Isaac (03:11):
The inspiration honestly came from a loss.
My husband passed about ninemonths ago from liver cancer.
That became rampant and rapidand we found out in April last
year and June he was gone and soI tried to grieve.
People kept saying, just grieveit out, and I did about two
weeks of it and I didn't like itbecause it wasn't really a part
of who I am and I just kind ofwas like, OK, what do I know
what to do, and I'm a workoutperson.
So I went to the gym everysingle day and as I was going to

(03:35):
the gym I started to thinkabout our conversations that we
had in that last week about howhe said what are you going to do
with your gift?
It kept ringing in my head andI was looking at it like my gift
of who I am, but also your giftof life.
And so it really made me to godeeper in and say, what do I
value, what do I want to do inthis next stage of my life?

(03:56):
And I realized what I wanted todo was help people to improve
their human experience, helppeople to live out their fullest
life because, honestly, no dayother than today, in this very
moment, are we guaranteed.
So how do I make that enjoyable?
Because no one wants to reallythink about it.
But how do we look at thatabout?
How do we make the actual daythat we're in the best day right

(04:19):
?
I think that you start to livethat way and that's how I
started to heal, was I kind ofdid this whole just for today
thing where it was like, justfor a day I'm going to get out
of bed.
Just for a day I'm going to goto the gym.
Just for a day I'm going tosmile, I'm going to laugh, and
they started to evolve.
And then one day, honestly, inmy meditation, it came to me all
the work that I've done overthe years as an advisor to
people, tech companies andthings.

(04:40):
I've done this work for a longtime, but I hadn't formulated it
in a process that I couldpackage and put out there to
sell.

Sonja Crystal Williams (04:47):
Wow, let's talk about what the
package looks like.
And so and I've been a part ofthe package, which is a really
cool experience, but the packagecomes in many forms.
So first I want to talk about,like I'd say, the part of the

(05:10):
package I'm most familiar with,the part of the community I'm
most familiar with, which isyour in-person gathering.
So, as you're buildingcommunity, I guess, describe
what is this community and howdo you facilitate people
starting to have this experienceor starting to explore what
their own personal experience is?

Kyion Isaac (05:28):
Yeah.
So first I started with thepeople I know and I started to,
I formulated it and I sharedwith people that were around me
that I knew would be honest withme, and they were the ones that
said you got something.
And I started to see thesetransformations honestly
happening in their lives withina week.
It's a seven day program, so T.
H.
E.
E.
is a seven day program todiscover your best you.

(05:49):
And in seven days that walks youthrough very hard questions, I
say of like who are you, what doyou want?
Where do you put your energy,right?
Those kinds of things thatsometimes we gloss over.
Yeah, and that's how it started.
And then I said, okay, now Ineed to put it up in a package,
which I did.
I put it up and people startedbuying and I was like that's

(06:10):
great, People are experiencing.
I'm getting all thesetestimonials.
But then I was like, but I'mmissing that community piece and
, honestly, the very simplething that I did.
One of the parts of the was agratitude group.
So initially, when you did the,you could join this gratitude
group which is on WhatsApp, andso people came onto the
gratitude group.
So it was after they did theseven days.

(06:30):
I started tracking them and Iwas seeing people were saying
seven years of this and that andall these things have been
changing.
And I messaged them and waslike what is it?
They were like this gratitudegroup of continuation and
accountability and having theenergy of other people that have
been through it is great.
But then I thought what if Iopen it up and use this as the
way to get people inwho might be a little bit afraid

(06:53):
and intimidated by theseven-day program, and that has
been wonders we have.
I started the group maybe acouple months ago.
We're at 70 members of peoplewho started inviting other
people because of they'venoticed a difference in them and
that has been how we're able todo online but in person, which
you're familiar, which is thesecircles, because I woke up one

(07:14):
day and I was like I want tohave as many people experience
this as possible.
So, as you attended, I hostedat the circle.
It was amazing and from that,women who've been there have
allowed me to host circles forthem.
I have one in two days.
I'm actually going to a schoolto do a circle for high school
students because they feel thatthis is very important to have

(07:36):
that as a foundation of justgetting a sense of self
understanding who you are,because it changes as we evolve.
But those are many ways.
But whether you go through theprogram, or you come through the
gratitude group on WhatsApp, oryou have a circle that we host
and, lastly, I just launched ourfree membership because I
believe that you got to givepeople a little bit.

(07:58):
So that's where you have thosefreemiums, freebies that you
give.
So I'm giving meditations now,putting them in there.
I have a discipline trackerthat people can look at how
they're really spending theirtime so they can really see.
Oh, I really do need the.
I actually do need this program.
So helping them get like you,you know the, the things that we

(08:19):
have to do, give people enoughto see I actually I'm not as
disciplined as I need to be orI'm not putting my energy where
I thought I was.
I did it myself and I was prettyaccurate on it.
But I realized I spent a lot oftime putting my kids to sleep
and I was like I looked it up, Iadded it up.
I spent a month a year whereyou add up all the hours of

(08:43):
putting them to sleep or wakingthem up, like you put them naps,
and all that.
It was a month.
I was like, oh, we got tochange this.
So I immediately looked andsaid I talked to them; they're
two and four.
I said, listen, we can't dothis, I can't keep-- I can't
spend a month of the yearputting y'all to sleep.
And I adjusted there, but Ididn't, I didn't know.

(09:04):
So that's, that's a lot of time.
Yeah, a lot of time puttingthem to sleep.

Sonja Crystal Williams (09:12):
Getting them to a month, that's a lot,
so it's bold too 'cause how doyou explain that to the two year
old?
But really they're going tofollow suit.
It's just that it's sometimeshard, you know I know personally
as a parent to feel like I'mgoing to rock their world.
But it might be necessary andit might be necessary for the
betterment of you, for thebetterment of them.

(09:32):
So that's huge.
I love how you bring up thediscipline piece, because that's
a part of you that I know whereit's almost like that
accounting background and if youall know Kyion's bio.
She's got a background inaccounting mixed with the
project management, mixed withthe experiences you've had for

(09:54):
Gosh.
It's been you've been had abusiness probably as long as I
had.
So we're talking 15 plus yearsof this ownership experience and
knowing how to bring thattogether into something that is
executable for people to follow.
So discipline is huge as we.
Let's go back to talking alittle bit more about WhatsApp.

(10:17):
So, with the online part of thecommunity, WhatsApp is the, I
guess, the mechanism that you'reusing.
What made you choose WhatsApp?
I know so many people whenthey're trying to decide, how am
I going to keep in touch withmy community, my people?
There's so many.
There's Telegram, there'sGroupM e, there's Facebook, all

(10:40):
these independent things and you, you chose WhatsApp.

Kyion Isaac (10:44):
Yeah, about well, I'll tell you I wanted to make
it easy.
Yeah, I want it because it'slike texting.
If I want you to start to live,the first foundation of the is
living a life full of gratitudeand being able to recognize
things that you're grateful forevery day, because it starts to
bring that energy towards youand you start to see more things

(11:04):
show up in your life thatyou're grateful for.
And I thought about it and Isaid GroupM e.
I don't like GroupM e, to behonest with you, so I didn't
want to be there.
Facebook, I'm not on Facebookand I said I don't want it to be
a social component, becausepart of it is disconnecting a
little bit from those things attimes.
And so WhatsApp, honestly, wasthe easiest one, because we have

(11:25):
a lot of international people.
We have people in London,England that are part of the
group that wanted to join.
And I just thought about, I sawI kept seeing these pop-ups of
WhatsApp adding these new daysand new features and new that.
And I went in there and I waslike, oh, they have community.
I was like this is smartbecause anywhere you go,
whatsapp is already there.

(11:46):
You don't have to have a socialmedia account to have it.
You don't have to have a wholebunch to do.
It's almost like texting, so itmakes it very easy and I don't
have to worry about if you'vegot an iPhone or Android.
You got blue bubbles or greenbubbles.
It's just a universal thingthat people feel comfortable
already using.
So I want to meet people wherethey are and they happen to have
more features that are rollingout to make it more enjoyable to

(12:09):
have community where you don'thave to go on to a social
platform.

Sonja Crystal Williams (12:13):
Yeah, all you need is a telephone.

Kyion Isaac (12:16):
All you need is a telephone.
That's what I love about it isthat if I get up and I send them
a picture or whatever I'm goingto send for that day, and it's
done, I'd have to log intoanything.
It's like texting it's easy totext.
Sometimes it's not always easyto pick up the phone and call,
or I gotta go on here and thinkabout how it's gonna look, put a
filter on.
It's too much.
And so I found WhatsApp beingvery easy, but also for people

(12:39):
to invite.
It has that invitationcomponent to it, so when people
feel it has settings where youcan request or you can allow
people to add and everythinglike that.
So so I found it being easybecause people started adding
people and so it takes themarketing a little bit out of my
hands and the people whoactually are my ambassadors, who
have seen the change in theirlives, are like, hey, let me

(13:01):
invite my people because I wantmore people around me who are
living a life of gratitude.

Sonja Crystal Williams (13:12):
And so you said ambassadors, are they
formally ambassadors, are they?
Hey, these are just peoplehaving great experiences and you
encourage them.
You can invite friends, you canbring whoever you want into the
.

Kyion Isaac (13:27):
At first it was just for people who went through
T.
H.
E.
E.
, but because I saw suchtransformations and it was such
an easy lift for people to startwith.
Sometimes sign up for amembership even if it's free,
getting a whole new loginbecomes difficult at first.
So I said what's the easiestthing, which is WhatsApp,
because most people already haveit on their phone.
So if someone says, hey, I wantto invite you to my WhatsApp

(13:48):
group for gratitude, it's notgoing to have anything but
gratitude in it.
So it keeps it simple.
You're not worried about peopletrying to sell you on anything
or anything like that.
And then you know it's aprogram and I have things on the
announcement page and I usethat as a filter to push them in
.
But, yes, I allow, because yourstrongest form of marketing is
word of mouth, and so I can postas many testimonials on social

(14:16):
media which we do, but it's nomuch.
It's no greater than someonethat you've already known,
that's been impacted and you'veseen it.
And they say, what's, what areyou doing?
They're like, oh, I'm in agratitude group, you want to
join?
Boom, I joined, you're in thatquick.
There's no hurdle, it's verysimple, it's easy, and so I just
opened it up.
Like two weeks ago we had 15and now we're, like I said,
about 70.
Wow and so and that's just fromit being open, and then you know
teaching people to open up andyou know share it with other

(14:38):
people and you know, becausepeople start to I don't know
what this person is there, butit's grown and most of the
people that have been invitedhave not been for me because,
again, they feel the need tobring more people, because they
want, because they especiallypeople who are not going to be
want to be around other people,so it makes them start to think
a little bit.
Maybe I should open up a littlebit about this lifestyle of

(15:00):
mine to help the people aroundaround me one more question
about the inner workings of thegroup.

Sonja Crystal Williams (15:06):
In WhatsApp, and that is you
mentioned, you get up in themorning, you send a message, so
are you the primary driver offacilitating conversation each
day, or do the group memberstake that on themselves?

Kyion Isaac (15:22):
I wish I could say I'm the first to post gratitude
in the group and I try to be,because I post around 5am but I
am not well, not at five.
Okay, because we have peoplewho are in London yeah, so
they're in our group midnight to3 am.
We get a lot of posts in thegroup and so if I didn't post it
wouldn't matter, because theypost, they post and I just um

(15:45):
offered up a meditation now, um,that I'm going to do virtually,
um, coming now that I'm goingto do virtually coming right now
, I'm going to continue to dothem on like full moons, and I
people are like can you send memeditation, can you?
All these things that I'mcreating is coming from the
community because they're saying, hey, I want to be more
disciplined.
And then I shared with people.
I'll give an example of theother day.
You're all disciplined becauseevery day you get up and you

(16:08):
write in this group takesdiscipline, and so that then
opens the conversation for morethings to be done and then I
just add more in there.
As far as, like the, you knowthe mechanisms for them to
achieve, I read people'sgratitude lists and see where
they're working on and see whatcan I help, what can I provide
to assist them.
But as far as the gratitude,they don't need me.

Sonja Crystal Williams (16:31):
They don't need me they don't need me
um speaking of looking atpeople's gratitude list and
working with them.
Do you get those aside?
Conversations where, okay, whatdoes that?
What does that look like?

Kyion Isaac (16:45):
Yeah, so people sometimes give me that side
conversation, which is often allthe time, or someone in the
group who invited, like someoneso told me this, you know, but
they're afraid to ask, okay andso I offer up these so I have a
link where they can go to.
The people have already startedto take the.
And then there's some peoplewho are like I need one on one,
and I offer a limited amount ofone on one sessions.

(17:06):
That's where people need thatcoaching.
They might be in a bigtransition of life where they're
looking to switch careers ortheir stuff.
I get a lot of people who arestuck.
They're like I just don't knowwhat I want to do.
I've been doing this all mylife, or for a very long time,
and I don't enjoy it.
And now that I'm in this groupI realized that I don't enjoy it
.
I realized it's not something that I can make up

(17:26):
anymore.
I can't pretend I'm gratefulfor it because it gives me my
means.
It doesn't bring me that partthat you're talking about when I
started saying who am I andwhat do I want.
It's not what I want, Right.
So they need a little bit moreassistance.
But I also have rolled out,since I started doing the
circles because some people wantto do things together Group
coaching, which is what I reallyenjoy.
It's a group of people who cometogether that want to be

(17:49):
coached that they actually startto make that transformation
together.
So they already have that builtin support system that's
already around them in theirintermediate community.

Sonja Crystal Williams (17:58):
Wow, support and the connection
You're not going through italone either based on some
things that you may discoverthrough the process.
So that's pretty amazing, wow.
So, kian, I like to end everyshow with a lightning round.

Kyion Isaac (18:15):
OK, and I've got a couple of questions.

Sonja Crystal Williams (18:19):
Nothing too earth shattering, but in our
lightning round.
I will just throw out just twoor three simple little questions
to you, and they're just shortanswers.
They don't have to be longerelaborate, ok.
So first answer is you hit thelottery.
Let's just say you hit a cashthree, you win $2 million.

(18:39):
What are you doing with some?
You don't have to sayeverything, but what do you know
?
The fun stuff?
I know the responsible adult isgoing to say I'm going to
invest and say I'm not going totalk about that because that's a
given.

Kyion Isaac (18:54):
I'm an accountant.
But the fun stuff honestly, I'mgoing to be on a beach with my
kids, allowing them to swim inthe ocean for a good month, like
a good month, a good beach trip.
And honestly, the other funside of it I can't lie is that I
want a facility, I want afacility.
So I want to have a facilityfor the, where people can come

(19:15):
to and have that, that, thatthat physical location that they
can tap into with those likeminded people, those will be the
two fun things, because thebeach is a given I have to be on
a beach.

Sonja Crystal Williams (19:30):
I'm a cancer, I'm a water sign.
We need water.
What are you either listeningto it could be audio books or
podcasts, or reading right nowthat you feel like is having
some impact on your Businesslife?

Kyion Isaac (19:43):
It's an autobiography of a yogi.

Sonja Crystal Williams (19:46):
Oh yes.

Kyion Isaac (19:46):
Right now.
Yeah, I watched a documentaryon him, and now I'm listening to
the audio.
I've read part of it and then Iwent back into the audio part.

Sonja Crystal Williams (19:55):
Yeah, that's a very thick book.
Well, enjoy that yeah it's athick book.

Kyion Isaac (19:59):
I was like 20 hours of audio.
I was like, oh gosh, that'slike 30 trips in the car
somewhere.

Sonja Crystal Williams (20:05):
Yes, I've read it.
It's a wonderful read, though,so enjoy it.
Final question what's the finalquestion I want to ask today?
Final question is and I askedthis question a few weeks ago to
another guest let's pretendthere's a multiverse and there's
versions of Kyion everywhere.
What ?

Kyion Isaac (20:31):
Some of the other versions of Kyion.
Let's see, that's funny becauseI believe in multiverse.
So the side of Kyion, that's,you know, doing T.
H.
E.
E.
and all this kind of stuff.
And then there's the side of mewhere I'm doing all the crazy
things jumping out of planes, uh, climbing every mountain that I
possibly can.
If I could really get paid tojust do that, and it makes sense
.
Yeah, I'm an extremist, so I'mdoing every extreme sport

(20:55):
because I feel like in thatmultiverse that I'm in, I can't
die in that one.
Like I can't go over again likea game like oh you know, you got
five more lives, I get arecharge after 24 hours.
So I'm doing all that extremestuff.
Like I get a rush from that,Like I get a rush from that, and
then the other one is probablyeating everything in the world

(21:19):
because just to know what ittastes like, because I have such
a strict palate.
But I think in another life Iwould love to just eat food
because I really do enjoy it.

Sonja Crystal Williams (21:27):
Those are good.
I enjoyed that All right.
So, Kyion, how can people learnmore about T.
H.
E.
E.
as well as if they'reinterested in either the
gratitude group, the seven dayprogram or anything else that
you offer?
Where can people get moreinformation and anything you
want to give away?

Kyion Isaac (21:49):
Discoverthee.
com.
If they go there, it gives themaccess to the gratitude group,
allows them to become a member,allows them to purchase the
seven day program or take any ofour things that we have.
Everything is on the website.

Sonja Crystal Williams (22:01):
Awesome.
Thank you so much for beinghere and thank you everyone else
for listening.
I hope you got a lot out oftoday as it relates to online
communities, but also thinkingabout your own human experience.

Kyion Isaac (22:11):
Have a great day everyone.
Thank you.
Advertise With Us

Popular Podcasts

Dateline NBC
Who Killed JFK?

Who Killed JFK?

Who Killed JFK? For 60 years, we are still asking that question. In commemoration of the 60th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's tragic assassination, legendary filmmaker Rob Reiner teams up with award-winning journalist Soledad O’Brien to tell the history of America’s greatest murder mystery. They interview CIA officials, medical experts, Pulitzer-prize winning journalists, eyewitnesses and a former Secret Service agent who, in 2023, came forward with groundbreaking new evidence. They dig deep into the layers of the 60-year-old question ‘Who Killed JFK?’, how that question has shaped America, and why it matters that we’re still asking it today.

Las Culturistas with Matt Rogers and Bowen Yang

Las Culturistas with Matt Rogers and Bowen Yang

Ding dong! Join your culture consultants, Matt Rogers and Bowen Yang, on an unforgettable journey into the beating heart of CULTURE. Alongside sizzling special guests, they GET INTO the hottest pop-culture moments of the day and the formative cultural experiences that turned them into Culturistas. Produced by the Big Money Players Network and iHeartRadio.

Music, radio and podcasts, all free. Listen online or download the iHeart App.

Connect

© 2024 iHeartMedia, Inc.