Revolution 250 Podcast

Revolution 250 Podcast

Revolution 250 is a consortium of organizations in New England planning commemorations of the American Revolution's 250th anniversary. https://revolution250.org/Through this podcast you will meet many of the people involved in these commemorations, and learn about the people who brought about the Revolution--which began here. To support Revolution 250, visit https://www.masshist.org/rev250Theme Music: "Road to Boston" fifes: Doug Quigley, Peter Emerick; Drums: Dave Emerick

Episodes

October 12, 2021 34 min

Who was Lafayette, and why was he so important?  Alan Hoffman, President of the American Friends of Lafayette who has translated Auguste Levasseur's Lafayette in America,.  an account of Lafayette's American tour in 1824-1825.  Find out why May 20 is Lafayette Day in Massachusetts, and what you can do to commemorate it. 

Share
Mark as Played

Best remembered now for the eponymous beer that started the craft brewing industry, Samuel Adams was a great political leader in Massachusetts.  Yet this fervent author of editorial pieces in support of the rights and liberties of the people is little known today.  We learn more thanks to  Ira Stoll, author of Samuel Adams:  A Life.

Share
Mark as Played
September 28, 2021 32 min

The first time the patriots use artillery, the first time they sink a British ship, and the first time officers and men from different colonies stage a joint operation--the battle of Chelsea Creek, in what today are the cities of Chelsea and Revere, and the East Boston neighborhood, along an industrial waterway that still retains much of its 18th-century contour.  We hear from archaeologists Craig Brown, a PhD candidate at the Univ...

Share
Mark as Played

 Benjamin Carp (Associate Professor and Daniel M. Lyons Chair of History at Brooklyn College) about the Great Fire of New York that occurred September 20 & 21, 1776, the Boston Tea Party and urban life during the Revolution.

Share
Mark as Played

 Professor Robert Bellinger on the lives and experiences of African Americans in the American Revolution, the presence of free and enslaved persons at Lexington and Concord and the connections between Massachusetts and Middleton Place in South Carolina.

Share
Mark as Played

With over 190,000 members nationwide, the Daughters of the American Revolution have been preserving America's heritage, awarding scholarships and supporting American civics and patriotism for more than 100 years.  Paula Renkas, State Regent for the Massachusetts Daughters of the American Revolution, tells us about their work in education, historic preservation, and fostering patriotism by supporting veterans.

Share
Mark as Played

 Virginia DeJohn Anderson (University of Colorado) eminent scholar of life in Colonial America and most recently the author of The Martyr and the Traitor:  Nathan Hale, Moses Dunbar, and the American Revolution talks with us about these two men from Connecticut, both hanged in the first year of the War--Hale hanged by the British as a spy, Dunbar hanged in Connecticut as a loyalist.  What lead each one his particular path?  What do...

Share
Mark as Played

The Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, passed by the Virginia legislature in 1786 is both a statement on religious conscience and the concept of the separation of church and state.  A conversation with John Ragosta, author of  Wellspring of Liberty ,   historian at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello, which maintains a great database of Jefferson materials,  on the topic of the Virginia...

Share
Mark as Played

Christina Proenza Coles new work, AMERICAN FOUNDERS reveals men and women of African descent as key protagonists in the story of American democracy. It chronicles how black people developed and defended New World settlements, undermined slavery, and championed freedom throughout the Americas from the 16th through the 20th century.

Join Professor Bob Allison in conversation with the author in a discussion on the lives and legacies of...

Share
Mark as Played
August 10, 2021 32 min

We talk with Kelly Cobble, Curator at the Adams National Historical Park in Quincy, home to four generations of the Adams family.  We hear about Louisa Catherine Adams's harrowing trip across war-torn Europe in 1815, and about the two Adams birthplaces--the John Adams birthplace is the oldest Presidential birthplace in the nation.  What did these four generations of Adamses have in common?  Courage.  

Share
Mark as Played

Jack Rakove. Pulitzer-prize winning historian and political scientist from Stanford, joins us for a discussion of  religious freedom, (see his book, Beyond Belief, Beyond Conscience) the Continental Congress, (the subject of his first book, The Beginnings of National Politics),  the Federalist papers, James Madison, John Dickinson and other Revolutionaries. 

Share
Mark as Played

He was trained to cure the sick and aid the wounded. He wrote eloquently in the cause of liberty. He organized resistance to tyranny and oppression. He was a political leader admired and respected throughout the colonies. He volunteered to stand in the front lines, and died in the name of freedom, at the Battle of Bunker Hill.  The role of Dr. Joseph Warren in bringing about American Independence cannot be overstated.  We talk with...

Share
Mark as Played

When the King heard his forces had taken Ticonderoga in August 1777, he thought he had won the war.  What went wrong?  We talk with Kevin Weddle about his new book, The Compleat Victory, about the decisive battle of Saratoga.  How did the British strategy go so badly wrong--and why did the Americans win?  And what did the victory mean?  Kevin Weddle is an historian, but also a graduate of West Point with a 28-year career in the Uni...

Share
Mark as Played
July 13, 2021 34 min

Originally built as Fort Carillon by the French army between 1755 - 1757, Fort Ticonderoga sits at a strategic junction of Lake Champlain, La Chute River, and Lake George.  British forces--including soldiers from Massachusetts--captured it in 1759, and then in May 1775 forces from Massachusetts and Connecticut, and from what is now Vermont took it from the British.  Henry Knox brought sixty tons of artillery from Ticonderoga to hel...

Share
Mark as Played

Historian Mike Bunn tells us about the tumultuous political scene in this borderland colony of West Florida, stretching from the Appalachicola River to the Mississippi, featuring  a host of bold and colorful characters on the fringes of the British and Spanish empires.  Find out more in this episode, and in Mike Bunn's book, The Fourteenth Colony:  The Forgotten Story of the Guf South During America's Revolutionary Era. 

Share
Mark as Played

Nathaniel Philbrick talks about the impact of the American Revolution on American culture and history; the importance of George Washington as a political unifier;  the Battle of Bunker Hill as a seminal event on the road to American Independence;  and Moby Dick.  

Share
Mark as Played

Why was education such a critical goal of America's revolutionaries?   We talk with Andrew J. O'Shaughnessy about his new book,  TheThe Illimitable Freedom of the Human Mind, about Thomas Jefferson's idea of a university. 

Andrew O'Shaughnessy teaches at the college Jefferson founed, and he is director of the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies.  His most recent book was The Men Who Lost Ameri...

Share
Mark as Played
June 22, 2021 33 min

Now in its 70th year, the 2.5 mile route through historic downtown Boston sees millions of visitors every year. The marked route connects 16 nationally important historic sites in Boston covering three centuries of history. Suzanne Taylor, Executive Director of the Freedom Trail Foundation, and Emily Kovatch, the Trail's Experiences Manager and occasionally Mehitable Dawes, tell us how the Freedom Trail brings history to life f...

Share
Mark as Played

Commander John A. Benda, the 76th commanding officer of the USS CONSTITUTION, tells us a bit about the oldest commissioned warship afloat in the world,  and its crew of 80 active-duty sailors.  We hear about George Sirian's 50-year naval career, which began when he arrived on the ship orphaned in the Greek war for independence, and about the Pope's visit, and CONSTITUTION's encounters in Vietnam in the 1840s, and how th...

Share
Mark as Played
June 8, 2021 32 min

Dr. John Concannon of the Gaspee Days Committee discusses the 1772 event the "first blow for Liberty" in Rhode Island. Was this a pre-coordinated event, or the passionate response of a seafaring people upon the Royal Customs Commission?  Learn about the plans for the Gaspee Days 2022 - the 250th anniversary of the burning of the HMS Gaspee, and about where you can learn more about the burning of the Gaspee.

Share
Mark as Played

Popular Podcasts

  • If you can never get enough true crime... Congratulations, you’ve found your people.

  • Dateline NBC

    Current and classic episodes, featuring compelling true-crime mysteries, powerful documentaries and in-depth investigations.

  • Stuff You Should Know

    If you've ever wanted to know about champagne, satanism, the Stonewall Uprising, chaos theory, LSD, El Nino, true crime and Rosa Parks then look no further. Josh and Chuck have you covered.

  • The Ben Shapiro Show

    Tired of the lies? Tired of the spin? Are you ready to hear the hard-hitting truth in comprehensive, conservative, principled fashion? The Ben Shapiro Show brings you all the news you need to know in the most fast moving daily program in America. Ben brutally breaks down the culture and never gives an inch! Monday thru Friday.

  • Morbid: A True Crime Podcast

    It’s a lighthearted nightmare in here, weirdos! Morbid is a true crime, creepy history and all things spooky podcast hosted by an autopsy technician and a hairstylist. Join us for a heavy dose of research with a dash of comedy thrown in for flavor.

Advertise With Us
Music, radio and podcasts, all free. Listen online or download the iHeartRadio App.

Connect

© 2021 iHeartMedia, Inc.