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November 6, 2023 46 mins

On this episode, Mike and Kelsey give their Best and Worst movie picks for the month of October and why you should watch and skip each of their picks.  Mike also shares his thoughts on the Variety article ‘Crisis at Marvel’ and the rumor of them reviving the Original Avengers including Robert Downey Jr. returning as Iron Man. In the Movie Review, Mike shares his thoughts on Priscilla. It’s about her life after she meets Elvis Presley at a party when she’s a teenager and he’s already a rock and roll icon in his 20’s. Mikes breaks down the actor’s performances, how their relationship is portrayed, Jacob Elordi as Elvis and how it differs from the Elvis film released in 2022.   In the Trailer Park, Mike breaks down The Fall Guy starring Ryan Gosling and Emily Blunt. It’s an action comedy about a stuntman who finds himself working on a movie set with the star for whom he doubled long ago and who replaced him. The star then goes missing.

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Episode Transcript

Available transcripts are automatically generated. Complete accuracy is not guaranteed.
Speaker 1 (00:00):
Hello, and welcome back to movie Mike's movie podcast. I
am your host Movie Mike. Today, my wife and co
host Kelsey joins me. How are you. I'm good, aside,
I'm being a little bit under the weather, so sorry
if my voice is a little scratchy. Best and Worst
of the month is what we're gonna do talking about
all the movies we saw in October. We're gonna get
into some movie news too, which I have read the
entire Variety article diving into what is happening at Marvel

(00:22):
right now, so I'll give you my thoughts on that.
Kelsey has something festive coming up for that segment, we'll
get into the movie review, we'll get into the trailer park.
Thank you for being here, shout out to the Monday
Morning Movie crew. And now let's talk movies. In a
world where everyone and their mother has a podcast, one
man stands to infiltrate the ears of listeners like never

(00:43):
before in a movie podcast. A man with so much
movie knowledge, he's basically like a walking IMTB with glasses.
From the Nashville Podcast Network, this is Movie Mike's Movie
Podcast Best and Worst for the month of October. Kelsey,
you kick us off. What was your best movie of

(01:05):
the month. I think it's obvious Teller's The Flower Move
That is mine too. We had to go double here
a comboo bass movie of the month. There was no
other contender. I found myself coming back to thinking about
that movie more and more, and maybe it's a little
bit overcritical. Giving it a four. I still stand by it,
but I think after I watch it for a second time,
whenever it comes out on Apple, maybe it'll go up

(01:28):
a little bit. That given myself a little bit more
time to spend with it and look back on some
things I didn't like upon the first watch, maybe I
like it a little bit more and judge it a
little less harshly the second time. But is that a
movie you would consider watching again even though it's so long?
Oh yeah, I bought it again, especially at home when
I can take breaks. And I did see an interesting

(01:49):
survey come out recently if there should be an intermission
between movies shown in theaters, and there are different options here,
so let me know where you stand. Twelve percent said
yes for all movies there should be an internation, twenty
three percent yes for movies two hours or longer, twenty
four percent of people said yes. For movies that are
three hours or longer, twenty five percent say no, and

(02:09):
for some reason, seventeen percent say not sure. Where do
you stand on should there be intermissions for longer movies
in theaters? As a resonant member of the tiny bladder community, okay,
you represent that demographic. I'm going to shock you're gonna
say no. No whatsoever, it messes up the flow of
the movie. I don't have the lights to go up.
I don't want everyone to be milling around. No messes

(02:32):
the flow. When do you do the intermission? What if
halfway through the movie there's a critical plot point, You're
just like, all right, time for everyone to go pee,
come back in ten minutes for the action commenced. No exactly.
I see a lot of things wrong with this. So
I don't have a small bladder, but I am right nice.
I'm right there with the no twenty five percent. I
say no because along those same lines, I think a

(02:55):
director would have to start thinking of when do I
place the brig It kills the momentum. There could be
spots where a theater just decide, hey, this is where
the break should be. Whether it be like ninety minutes
or two hours. I feel like that throws off the
flow of the movie. And when I go watch a
movie that I'm really into, I don't want to lose
that momentum. I feel like it makes sense in like
theater because you also have the performers who probably need

(03:16):
a break. But this is not a live entertainment and
a live show, I feel like there are more natural
spots where you can choose to break between act one
and act two. There's a different moment in a live
performance where you can say, Okay, here's a good time
for an intermission. In a movie, you don't have that
because then you're, like I said, you're gonna have to think, okay,
where should this story take a little bit of a break,

(03:38):
a little bit of a beat. People go to the theater,
but that's going to be chaos if people go into
the lobby, people go into the bathroom, and then everybody
comes back and you kick it back on. What if
you have people in the intermission that run into people
who have just seen the movie, and people in the
bathroom are talking about what happens there's and that are
in their intermission gets spoiled. Also, if my Queen Taylor
Swift doesn't need an intermission. We all can make it

(04:01):
their movie. Just get up, go to the bathroom, come back,
ask the person next to you. If it's a good movie,
you can use context clues to figure out what happened.
If it's a terrible movie, then why are you seeing
in the first place. Yeah, I think you can always
kind of find a natural point to go to the bathroom. Also,
going to the bathroom doesn't take that long. It depends
on why people are coming to the back. I guess

(04:21):
it depends what you have going on. But I feel
like I've timed how long it takes me to go.
I can be back in a few minutes. I don't
miss a whole lot. If you go with somebody, you
can tell them to catch you up real quick. If
you didn't miss anything, they're like, you're good. So I
also feel that adding on any time to a three
and a half hour movie is just gonna make it
feel so much longer. You're gonna spend the entire day
at the movie theater if you add any kind of

(04:42):
a break. Yeah. Here's the other thing. Our theater, they
only have one concession stand upstairs. The downstairs one isn't open.
If you have people in the intermission trying to go
get snacks, they're all gonna be upstairs. They're all still
gonna miss parts in the movie, and then they're gonna
be mad that they miss parts of the movie, even
in the intermission, So no one's gonna be happy. Yeah,
i'd say you don't do them at all. If anything

(05:03):
you could at for very long movies, I would say
over three hours, because now it's so natural for a
movie to be two and a half hours, no problem.
But maybe anything over three hours. You could offer different
showings that have an intermission, which, like we've been talking
about before, that theaters need to offer different kind of
experiences for different types of people. I think that could

(05:25):
be one of them. That's not a hard thing to
do to build in a ten minute intermission for those
people who want it. Maybe it would encourage some people
who hate long run times to go watch a movie.
It was actually really good idea. I also think that
theaters would be into it because, like you were mentioning,
it would give them time to go to the concession
stand again. They go make more money, they sell more candy,

(05:45):
they sell more popcorn, or they utilize the free refills
for theaters that have that that a lot of people
feel like don't use that because they don't want to
go back to the lobby and get a refill. So
I want to miss it. So yeah, theaters, if you're listening,
maybe maybe intermissions aren't about it different man, because like
what you said with the Taylor Swift movie, your theater
was more calm and relaxed, and there were some theaters

(06:08):
that were totally just vibrant like a concert. So I
feel like they could have had different types of showings
for people who just want to sit and enjoy the movie. Yeah,
and the single long version of that. So I feel like, yeah,
there should be different types of experiences that theaters should
be looking into. I also think that just generates interest, like, oh,
what is this kind of showing? It's a bring your
kid from home day showing? I don't know, something like that.

(06:30):
Did you have kid ones where your kids can run around? There?
You go, wow, I already forgot. I saw the eras.
Maybe this month? Is that my favorite? Oh? Is that
your favorite? Are we having like a an on air audible?
Because here's the thing that you can you can tell
me how far off. I am on this because I
didn't see it with you, and I said the fact
that it is not truly cinema because there's no narrative

(06:53):
to the Taylor Swift Eras movie. It is just a
concert film. So I feel like me going to see
it and reviewing it, it wouldn't really make sense because
it's just a concert. There's no behind the scenes, there's
no overarching story throughout it. Would you agree with that?
I would agree. I think I'm gonna keep Killers to
the Flower Moon because she did also cut some songs

(07:15):
well Heartbroken even that was two hours forty six minutes.
It was indeed, so even that's a longer movie. But yeah,
she cut like forty five minutes out. The other thing
that we didn't mention whenever we did go see Killers
of the Flower Moon that our theater started rumbling because
there was an showing next door. No, it was literally vibrating. Yeah,
theater was. Everybody was worried because like what is happening? Yeah,

(07:38):
everyone started looking around it. And then I think you
just like hear the screams of twenty something year old
girls and teenagers and you're like, ah, the Eras film.
I was like They probably shouldn't have put that next
to such a quiet film. Yeah, it's weird because it's
such a Killers has like such like pensive moments, silence,
and then you have Taylor Swift blasting in the auditorium
next to us. But anyway, yes, we stand by both

(08:00):
of our favorite movies of the last month. We're Killers
of the Flower Moon. Honorable mention would be Arras Tour
and then we both stand by I'm surprised that you
agreed with this too. No intermissions in longer movies, no
matter what. Yeah, I just think it's going to ruin
the flow of a movie. I agree. So now we'll
get into our worst. What was your worst for the
last month? Oh god, this movie was so bad? Fair

(08:20):
play on Netflix. What is this movie about? We've both
watched it together. You wanted to watch it? I did,
and the trailer looked good. Yeah, it's like it's about
a Wall Street couple. She gets the promotion, he doesn't,
and it's about how their lives like change after that.
The movie was a train wreck. It was this is
a disaster described as an erotic thriller. Did you find

(08:41):
it erotic and thriller? You listen there are times when
I understand that an intimate scene in a movie adds
to the story, and then there are times where it's
just like gratuitous and it's like why was this here?
Every intimate scene in this movie, I was like, what
am I watching? Why? I'm a little scarred the opening

(09:02):
scene alone, Yeah, it's like, what are we watching? I
think we did say that. I think we said what
are we watching? I think you looked at me and
you said, what did you pick? And I was like, well,
it's supposed to be good, and it did get better
after that. It's like HBO's obsession was showing the male anatomy.
They just just throw it on the screen. Yeah, HBO
is known for that. That's how this movie felt was

(09:25):
they were just like, how can we It's almost like
they were worried that people were gonna lose interest in
the movie and they were like, how can we bring
it back? How about this? And everyone was like that's it.
That's the plot point. I will say the movie won
me back maybe about the end of the first act
that I ended up probably enjoying it more than you did,
because I would end up giving it about a three

(09:46):
out of five. I felt like the story was still
pretty good. There were some things that I had to
not suspend belief on but just except for what they
were and not take it so seriously, which I thought
the movie was gonna be a little bit more serious,
a little bit more straight on, and then it was
kind of more of like a like a fantasy story
almost for some people, but for my worst I'm going

(10:06):
with the movie I reviewed last week five Nights at Freddy's.
I gave it a one point five out of five,
and I stand by that. I knew it was bad
when you were like texting me movies almost over. You
never text during the movie, and I knew it was
bad when you were like, it's almost over. Thank God.
I had the weirdest moment after watching that movie, though,
because I couldn't see it any other way of people

(10:26):
actually enjoying that movie. And then I don't read reviews
going into a film because I want to have my
own opinion without any influence. And with that one, right
after I went and saw what other people said about it,
and people love that movie. And I think what I
missed is that it's kind of geared towards kids, and
I thought it was going to be a straight on
horror movie kids. But because the video game is so

(10:47):
popular with kids and people love those characters, I feel
like if you didn't have a relationship with the video
game and growing up with it, you didn't really get it.
So for the first time, I kind of felt like
a crusty old crist who didn't enjoy a movie that
all these all these young people are loving. I felt like,
what the youngsters. Yeah, I feel like ten years ago
that was me loving all the Marvel movies and critics

(11:09):
being like, ah, those are so stupid and terrible. So
it was a weird moment for me of like not
knowing about this fan base. And it was also an
instance where I posted the review and I got crushed
online because everybody was like, ah, you look like a
type of person who would say this, and I'm like, man,
I really didn't know that there was such a passion
for five Nights at Freddy's. So I don't think I'll

(11:30):
go back and rewatch it. But I saw like clips
of people talking about it, and it almost convinced me like, man,
maybe there was something I was missing out here, but
maybe I saw the wrong movie. But if they make
a sequel, I'll be interested in it now because it
was so successful and made so much money on a
very low budget, which was also surprising to me that
a movie like that would crush, even the fact that
it came out on Peacock at the same time. You

(11:53):
think people would just run to Peacock and not go
as much to see it in theaters, but it just
crushed and dominated. So that was one I was like,
I'm glad for the success of it because I love
seeing movies that have a really small budget do really
well at the box office, and I think horror is
the genre where you can do that, spend a little bit,
create that environment and that feeling for the viewer, and

(12:14):
then just cash in on it. So I just missed
the boat on that one, but I stand by it.
I still think it's a terrible movie. I don't get it.
I don't understand it. And if that makes me sound
old and then a touch on that one will still
be it. That's my first one. People really said, you
look like the type of person that would say though, yeah,
they told me my review was an l was that
my little brother? Maybe it was all right, that's the

(12:35):
best and the worst of the last month. I want
to switch it up a little bit and get into
some movie news. We've each brought a story we want
to share that has happened and developed recently, and we'll
just kind of talk about it. So what do you
have in movie news? Kelsey? First off, I would like
to tell you I'm sorry I crammed eleven cookies into
your VCRH. I know where this is going, guys. It's

(12:57):
the twentieth anniversary of Elf, which does indeed make me
feel old. I can't believe that movie is twenty years old.
And I think of Elf as a modern classic, but
now it's not that modern anymore, because before it was like, ah,
I don't think they can make any more Christmas classics
that will watch every single year, and Elf became that.
Now the movie has been out twenty years, so it's
just like a classic twenty years And anyone that lives

(13:21):
in New York, I'm really jealous because on November seventh,
they are lighting up the Empire State Building in green
and yellow, which looks like Buddy the Elf. This sounds
like your dream you love New York City, which I'm
so sad because we are going in a few weeks
we're just like missing the boat. But they are doing
like an interactive experience where you can go take a

(13:41):
picture with a life size cut out of Buddy the Elf.
So I will be dragging you to that. Oh yeah,
you love New York, you love Elf. This is like
everything you right now, This is all I want. And
I couldn't sleep last night. I was doing some online shopping.
I like to tell you on the podcast, So okay,
this is I'm just gonna start telling you about my
purchases on the podcast in front of an audience. So

(14:01):
they're doing merch for the twentieth anniversary. Yes, and you
already purchased something I did. I bought it this incredible
elf pillow from Pottery Barn. This is not they are
not paying me. I did not. I promise you. I
bought this pillow with my own money and it is
the coolest pillow. Because sometimes merch is like kind of cheesy.
Let me see it. I actually like that good because

(14:23):
it's going on the couch. So I don't love Christmas
as much as you do. I'm not a gringch by
al say that. But you like love Christmas yea. And
Christmas tree is already up it's the one in our
bedroom went up on November first, and the only reason
that the big one didn't come until November second is
you were out of town. Yeah, I guess I don't
get into the decorating side of Christmas. You love that

(14:44):
part of it. I love it makes the house feel Cody.
I like that it doesn't look like cheesy Christmas stuff,
which I usually associated with. I've also found we have
a family tradition in that my brothers and I and
now you after marrying into the family, we all wear
matching Elf shirt on Christmas morning and we sit on
the stairs and take a picture. And I did see

(15:05):
that the Warner Brothers shop has a lot of cool
new shirts, so I think I found our Christmas attire.
So we're replacing the Bye Buddy, I hope you found
your dad. Why they're dead? Yeah, the Narwall shirt. Because
my thirteen year old brother lost his. I don't know
where it is. Now. We candle mag that my little
brother does have a Texas twang. He doesn't think he does,
but he does, and he's like, I don't know where

(15:26):
it went. And I did say they're also going to
put it back up on Max. So we can stream
it on Christmas. Yeah, they're really really leaning into like
the merch collapse, and I don't know, maybe next week
I'll come report on another purchase. Can we just have
like a safe space every week where I just tell
you everything I've bought for the house. But it's on
the podcast. It has to be movie related. All of

(15:48):
these things are Elf. They're doing some ELF candles. You know,
I love a candle? Do love candles? For my movie news?
I wasn't then talking about ELT? Oh what else you have?
Just how much I love it? And that it is
the season to watch Elf. It's the season to start
watching Christmas movies. Was it twenty twenty that we watched
every Christmas movie known to man? Including some terrible ones.
We went in deep into the vault for Christmas movie.

(16:10):
We even went like Christmas with the Cranks Vault, which, oh,
as you know, not a good one. But we'll start
with off this year. Okay, great, thank you. Can I
get that on writing, Yes, I'll write it right now. Okay, okay,
I'm done for my movie news. I read this entire
big article that Variety did on Marvel being in trouble,
which a lot of things stuck out to me. I
think the big headline is that apparently there were discussions

(16:33):
of rebooting the original Avengers with Robert Downey Junior Scarlett
Johansen coming back, and I feel like the reason they
would do that, we're already rebooting, not rebooting, but just
doing another story and bringing back the original Avengers, and
I don't know how true that is. Too soon. Essentially,
what the article says is that Marvel is in crisis

(16:54):
right now, one because a lot of their quality of
films hasn't been up to par, therefore kind of diminishing
the brand behind Marvel, which for the longest time you
just saw Marvel and thought that's going to be a
great movie. But now you see Marvel and you think,
ah might not even be that good, which it just
shows you, like how quickly things can change. From a

(17:16):
business perspective, it almost feels like they scaled too fast.
It's like when the hype was hot, they were like,
We're throwing everything into this, from making TV series or
doing all of this stuff, and it just it feels
like those businesses where they scale too fast. The Belgium,
many stores, the interest ees. I watch a lot of
those company man videos on YouTube. That is usually the problem.

(17:39):
You have a successful store, they want a franchise, they
start doing all these things, and then they can't manage
all the projects and then the quality goes down. I
think that is what happened here. I think it all
traces back to twenty twenty. So Endgame came out in
twenty nineteen, and then twenty twenty with the launch of
Disney Plus and the launch of all these TV shows.
I feel like they were trying to scale too fast.

(18:00):
The TV shows like One Division Great Great, like they
could have they could have stopped there. Yeah, because then
with She Hulk and all the other ones that have
just been kind of subpar, it takes away from the
excitement of a new Marvel show or a Marvel movie
coming out. So I feel like, really, what is hurt
Marvel was the Disney Plus model, which also was hurting

(18:20):
Disney at the same time, which people aren't mentioning, but
the fact that there's just so much content so quickly
coming out so soon, the visual effects have been suffering.
I just feel like it became so big that they
wanted to keep that same momentum going the entire time
that they had riding up till endgame, and it just

(18:41):
kind of broke down, and you also lose a lot
of those big characters. And then the thing is Marvel
started with unknown characters. There is a reason whenever Marvel
movies were first made that they came out with Spider Man,
Fantastic Four, and the X Men, because those were the
biggest comics. Naturally, those would be the first big movie
they would make. And then Marvel sold off the rights

(19:02):
to those movies. So then they started in two thousand
and eight with Ironman, who wasn't the most popular Marvel comic.
And that's exactly how they built the entire MCU with
using the lesser known characters that they had the rights
to to make the films with Thor and Captain America.
And but that's what their model was, Let's use these
lesser known characters that we have the rights to and

(19:23):
create something unique and create a cinematic universe. That is
exactly what they built their brand on. But now that
you don't have those characters anymore, you don't have those actors,
they're trying to do essentially the same thing they did
back in two thousand and eight with all these newer characters,
that they do have, but the interest just isn't there
as much because of the saturation. So I feel like
it's a saturation problem, which leads me back to the

(19:45):
point I brought up before that Marvel could go the
way of the Western, which the Western film was the
most popular between nineteen forty five and nineteen sixty for
fifteen years. You look at the timeline right now, from
two thousand and eight to twenty twenty three, that's fifteen years.
That's the same run good mental math skills. Oh thank you,
it's the same thing happening. You're bringing out the same
type of stories inside of the same genre. The audiences

(20:08):
just start to wear down a little bit too many movies,
and then what happened back in the sixties is you
had the rise of sci fi, therefore making the Western
look obsolete. I feel like that's gonna kind of happen
right now if they don't make a big change. I
still think you can make superhero movies. I just think
you kind of have to scale back the budget and
make something a little bit more novel. What I think

(20:29):
Marvel is missing is what DC is about to crush
it with and having these else worlds that are rated
r that are not in this big continuous this happens
and this movie connects with this one. They're just their
own thing. But I think the problem that Marvel has
is being connected to Disney. They just want the money
and they want all the things to go back to

(20:50):
Disney World and disney Land, so it kind of cuts
back on their creativity a little bit. And even with
Kevin Figi, who oversees Marvel, he spreads so thin right
now that he doesn't really have the same attention to
detail that he had early on when developing the MCU,
and that's why nothing really feels cohesive anymore. So I
didn't really think Marvel was in trouble until I read

(21:11):
this article and saw everything kind of laid out. And
now the whole issue they have with Jonathan Major's probably
not continuing as Kang, and they have really haven't had
any time because of the writers strike to write him
out of that, they may go with Doctor Doom, who
I don't love that decision because Doctor Doom seems so
cheesy in the Fantastic Four movies. Unless they really give

(21:31):
him the right tone, then you have the villain issue again.
I would like to say that we definitely agree with
them writing Jonathan mac oh, Yeah, just making that known that, Yeah,
I'm not on the side of him as much as
I loved him and amp Man, he shouldn't be Kang
the Conqueror anymore. They could recast him, which I feel
like would be the easiest choice, since they don't have

(21:53):
a way to write him out because they were basing
everything on that character. I think switching to doctor Doom
would be like, oh, Man, but he wanted to see King.
That just sounds like a dumb character name King. No, oh,
doctor Doom. People love him because of the comics, which
he's great in the comics, but if you look at
the Fantastic Four movies, he looks so cheesy. So you'd
have to make him a lot more like Thanos and

(22:14):
give him some kind of a human quality to make
me really interested in Doctor Doom. But he's a therapist.
Oh yeah, everybody's biggest fear therapy facing your demons. But yeah,
I think they need to scale back. I think they
need to make movies for a more modest budget. I
also think the problem Marvel has is they don't have

(22:37):
the same source material, like the same great stories that
DC has. Which, as you know, I mean getting more
into comics lately, wasn't aware. And I'm really more drawn
to DC's stories because they can be grittier and they
show you a different style of superhero. And then when
I look into the Marvel back catalog of comics and

(22:58):
try to find the one singular story for some of
these characters, it's not as strong as it is on
the DC side. So I feel like they need to
dig through their source material and find the really great
stories that showcase their superheroes in ways they haven't yet,
instead of kind of going back to that same well
that has been kind of the MCU style of making
movies with the comedy and the fun, lightheartedness. The well

(23:20):
has run dry. Yeah, they need to go back and
talk to some nerds, which is what I would encourage
them to do now. Yes, create like a focus group
of some hardcore comic book nerds and ask them what
are your favorite stories and what do you think we
should be making, because I think that is essentially what
you have to do is go back to the people
who know the source materials so well and the fans

(23:41):
that are so passionate, the fans that were there with
you in the very beginning, in the early stages, rooting
you on, talk to them and find out what they
want to do and what they want to see on
the big screen. It's actually a really good idea. Just
hold like a focus group like Comicon. Yeah, I mean
you already got all the nerds in one room when
you host Comicon. That's all you have to do. Talk
to some nerds because when as to self proclaimed nerds,

(24:01):
we're not hating on the nerds. We are nerds because
whenever movies get announced, you see the nerds comment first,
you know, referencing the comics. I feel like that's where
your answer lies, finding those stories and then also finding
directors who answer lies on the Facebook comments. Look, it
kind of does like as dark and dismal as that
may seem. Of like listening to the people who are
just shouting on their keyboards, sometimes there is something there

(24:25):
that you could talk to them about. But overall, I
don't think the article pointed out anything that I hadn't
really seen. It was just seeing it all kind of
laid out and all the pieces kind of fitting together
that they are on a bit of a decline, which
I don't think they are by any means going to
be terrible and completely out for the next five years.
I feel like it's really crazy that you make a

(24:47):
few bad projects and everybody kind of jump ship. I'm
not quite ready to jump ship yet. There are some
things I'm excited about coming from Marvel, but I do
think they need to step it up a bit, especially
with James Gunn taking over DC. Forgetting he went from Marvel, Yeah,
which people overlooked that he just crushed it this year
with Guardians at the Galaxy three that was such a
big hit. That was kind of quietly like everybody didn't

(25:10):
really contribute that to the MCU, but that was a
really big moment for them this year. How much do
we think that paycheck is to go from one to
the other? Oh tons of money? Nice, But with him
going over there and taking over making a new Superman
movie and generating some interest over there, if he can
do even a fraction of what he did with Guardians

(25:31):
with Marvel, imagine what he can do with DC. But again,
I can also see the same issues they have of
him being involved in so many projects and directing things,
and whenever people get spread so thin, the quality just diminishes.
So I think they just need to bring in some
more people and not base everything on one person, or
they need to just like truly take a hiatus, create

(25:52):
some like I don't know, Absence makes the heart grow fonder.
I mean, people miss a good Marvel movie and then
come back with something so strong. Stop putting out one two.
That is a great point and one I think would
solve everything except for their pockets. Well yeah, because yes,
going away and really spending some time to you know,
give viewers a chance to miss them, Give writers a

(26:13):
chance to have a break, Give the VFX artists a
chance to have a break, who have been just work
crazily to get all these projects out on time, and
the quality is suffered. Give everybody a break, recharge, and
come back with some really great content instead of, like
you said, just cranking things out over and over again.
But again, it's a giant business now they can't do
that and it, yeah, it sucks when things like that

(26:33):
become such a moneymaker because it's like it's just another
cog in the wheel now of their machine. But we
stand by that reviving the original Avengers right now would
be a terrible idea, right these don't I think you
need at least ten years. Twenty twenty nine would be
the earliest you could do that, even if it's some
I know they're in the multiverse saga right now, and

(26:53):
anything kind of goes which I'm also kind of tired
of the Multiverse right now. To be honest, I loved
it in the beginning. It's very confused. I think time
stories are kind of starting to wear on me a
little bit of different timelines. They were so interesting and
fascinating early on, but everybody's trying to do it now.
I think after the Flash, I kind of told myself,
I'm a little bit done with the multiverse. Just give
me some great, straight ahead stories, some characters to root for,

(27:17):
some hype moments. That's all we really want. Give me
like one, just like one time, present, day, past, future,
just one pick one. I also don't want movies to
connect anymore. I don't care about that. Yeah, like I think,
I think you also alienate because then people feel the
need to have seen everything. That is a great point.
I feel you you've set that quite a few times.
I feel very smart. This is why you're cos because

(27:39):
it is daunting to tell somebody, hey, there's a new
Marvel movie coming out. The first question is, well, do
I have to watch every single other of the thirty
two movies they've made. No, you just needn't watch the like.
You just need to get people to a point that
they just want to go watch one movie, be entertained.
Like I think Black Panther was one of the best
like standalone they've ever done. I have a friend who
hasn't ever seen any other Marvel movies. She's seen Black

(28:02):
Panther like three times. She was like, I loved it.
It's great. Go back to that original model. Trilogies thinking
trilogies Part one, Origin story, Part two, the emotional unraveling,
Part three, the conclusion, the big epic ending of our hero.
That's it trilogies, which just reminds me not a topic
for today, But we haven't talked on here about them
turning Harry Potter into like a series on is it Max? Yeah?

(28:25):
Oh yeah, that's a story for another day. I have
a lot of thoughts about that. But anyway, I could
probably go on this. Yeah, you got to talk about
this way longer than I got to talk about Elf.
I'm sorry. It was a long article and I had
a lot of things to say about it. It It was
a lot of passion. Anything else you want to mention
before we go? Honorable mention for the month. A couple
of good books there we go, one called The Last

(28:47):
life Boat. Of course it is a World War Two
I also had a breakthrough on that. I remembered I
used to read historical fiction as a child, and it
was like, that makes a lot more sense. So yeah,
the Last life Boat, it's a good one. I would
have an honorable man, but I feel like I went
too long in the marvel. I did read The Dark
Knight Returns, which is now my favorite graphic novel that
I've ever read. I love that you found a hobby

(29:08):
only because when my sevenths of four boxes come in
the mail every week, it's like, well, that's my hobby.
Because books are hard for me to finish, but graphic
novels I can sit down and read and there are pictures,
and there are pictures. So we'll come back, we'll do
the movie review, and we'll do the trailer park after this.

(29:30):
Let's get into it now. A spoiler free movie review
of Priscilla. You have Kaylee Spainey playing Priscilla in this movie.
Jacob Elordi plays Elvis. The movie is directed by Sophia Coppola,
who is a great director. She wrote the script for
this movie based on the book written by Priscilla Presley
who Priscilla is also an executive producer on this movie.
And I feel that is a very key role in

(29:51):
how I interpreted this movie and how I ended up
enjoying it so much, because to say that the dynamic
between Elvis and Priscilla's relationship is toxic is controversial is
kind of an understatement when you really look at the
facts that he was in his twenties already a superstar
whenever he met Priscilla while he was in the army

(30:12):
stationed in Germany. She was an army brat and she
was fourteen years old when they first met and started
spending time together. So the first twenty minutes of this movie,
it was really me getting adjusted to the idea of that.
And yes, this was back in the late fifties early sixties,
so maybe it was a little bit more common back then,
but still really weird. And I feel the way we

(30:35):
have Elvis placed in our heads as being this superstar
that is so beloved, I don't think this movie was
trying to diminish his reputation. It was really just telling
Priscilla's side of the story. It wasn't trying to paint
him in a bad life or even give him the
spotlight in this movie, because it is all from her
side of the relationship. But what this movie helped me

(30:56):
understand is what it's like to be married to somebody
who is that big of a icon and that big
of a presence, to be with somebody who is not
only famous, but gets everything that they want, has all
the money to do anything they could ever imagine. Going
back to the early stages of their relationship where she's

(31:16):
fourteen years old, Elvis is in the army and he
just lost his mother, and that's kind of where their
relationship really begins to grow because he was homesick, lost
his mother, and he needed somebody to confide in, and
that is what Priscilla became for him. She helped him
get through that time. She was the only one who
really saw him in those dark, intimate moments and became

(31:39):
somebody that he really leaned on. And in the book
she says that their relationship was strictly that. So the
interesting part for me to see in this movie was
seeing a side of Elvis that we haven't seen before.
We all saw the Boz Luhrmann movie last year, which
is very big and flashy, over the top, but that
movie focused so much on his music and his career

(31:59):
and really the relationship he had with Colonel Tom Parker,
his manager, and it was kind of their struggle, his
manager being the villain and Elvis being the hero of
that story. Here, it's a little bit different. Elvis isn't
really seen as a good guy. He's also not the
main focus of this movie. All the things that happened

(32:20):
to Priscilla throughout the film are as a result of him,
but it's all how his actions and his power influence her.
So it's a much different story that I really ended
up finding to be a more interesting story because it
was a side of him that we've never really seen before.
And it's really showing the dynamic of somebody married to
somebody so famous who ends up treating her the same

(32:43):
way that he treats everybody on his team. And it
was so interesting to see that dynamic that it's almost
that she wasn't a real life person to him. She
was as how Prisilla described him in her life to
be kind of his doll, that he would dress up,
tell her what to where, tell her how to speak,

(33:04):
tell her how everything he controlled which rock stars, famous people, actors, musicians,
they get so used to getting their way in every
aspect of their life that he took that and translated
into how he controls the person that he's supposed to
care about the most. There are moments where she is
the most important thing in this world that you see

(33:25):
throughout the film, but there are also moments where he
kind of forgets that. It shows Elvis's ability to lose
his temper in a second, his relationship with pills and
sleeping all day and partying and having all these people
around him all the time, and the toll that takes
on the partner in that relationship with Priscilla having to

(33:46):
stay at home when he goes on tour. We see
that side of him, of him being seen in tabloids
cheating on her and trying to tell her that it's
all made up. So there's a lot of manipulation. There's
a lot of gaslighting. There was a lot of grooming
early on, even though that that wasn't really known to
be a thing back in that time. That is exactly

(34:09):
what this movie shows. And again, I don't think it
was set out to villainize Elvis or tarnish his image.
I just think it was telling her side of the
story and based on her own words, based on everything
that she put in that book, and I think it's
very powerful. I found myself to be more moved by
Priscilla than I did Elvis last year, and I think

(34:32):
it's because it's an A twenty four film and it
just has a grittier feel to it, even down to
the actors' performances. I found myself being fully into Jacob
Ulordi as Elvis. Didn't fully look like him, but there's
the wardrobe. I didn't really see him and think, oh,
it's just a guy from Euphoria. I bought into the

(34:52):
fact that he was playing Elvis. I thought he had
the voice down pretty well. Maybe all the mannerisms and
show jomanship like of Elvis wasn't really showcasing this movie,
but I don't think it was supposed to. It was
really more geared towards the Elvis at home, and even
the way they reference him in this movie. They call
him E or EP, so it's kind of pulling the

(35:13):
curtain back a little bit more than we saw in
Elvis in seeing him just as human as he can be,
because he's not going to be a fully human character.
To have somebody that famous at that time, in no
way they're going to be human. So it was as
human as I think that we're going to see Elvis,
and showing his dark side even more so than we

(35:36):
saw in the film last year, because yes, that one
did showcase his addiction and the way he had to
fight through performances and once he got to Vegas and
all that, but this one showed more the effects of
him popping pills, the effects of sleeping all day, and
the effects of his temper. There are moments in this
movie where it gets very hostile between the two. You

(35:56):
see these fits of rage come out of him and
then quickly apologize, therefore adding to the dynamic of their
relationship that things were not good. The thing I wasn't
expecting to find in this movie was comic relief. The
movie was oddly comedic, not really on purpose, but there
were moments in the movie where they kind of made
Elvis out to be kind of a buffoon, to be

(36:17):
kind of a dummy, so there were moments in my
movie theater screening where people were laughing, and I feel
like that added a different level of tone to the
story of having these little moments where, oh, these are
normal people, even though they seem like larger than live figures.
So I thought that was a nice touch. I really
credit that to director Sophia Coppola, who I thought did
a fantastic job directing this movie and really getting some

(36:40):
amazing performances out of everybody. And also shout out to
the wardrobe department on this movie and the soundtrack and score.
They didn't use any Elvis songs. I think there are
a couple moments where they show some of his live performances,
but they really did a good job of keeping the
focus off of Elvis, which is probably hard to do
in a movie like this when and he is so

(37:01):
dynamic when he is on screen. It's having that ability
to shift it over to Priscilla to show the effects
that his stardom is having on her. And the score
also had like these really nice eighties inspired modern almost
rock hip hop type songs in between certain scenes. I
think specifically in the scene whenever her first big transformation

(37:21):
into how Elvis tried to get her to look exactly
like he wanted her to look. There were little moments
like that that really made it feel like an A
twenty four film because it took it out of the
time period and really modernized it. So I really like
that aspect of it too. Kind of reminded me of
what Boz Lherman always does and did with Elvis, of
putting these really modern tracks in places where you don't

(37:42):
expect them. So overall, when all was said and done,
and I know I keep comparing it to Elvis, which
maybe isn't the most fair thing to do, but I
found myself enjoying this side of the story more because
I think when it comes to biopicks, I love the
grittier side. I love the side that showed all the biggest,
darkest moments, which I don't really think Elvis focused on

(38:04):
that so much. This was really just almost a slice
of life story because when you look at the story
on paper, it's not a traditional story format, doesn't really
follow an act one, two, and three. It's really just
telling their entire life story. So I feel like it
was directly taken from the book. So I think what
the movie served as was just a really deep dive
and a character study into these really gritty characters. So

(38:27):
I found that way more enjoyable in the big lavish
musical movie that we got last year, because it's really
just plays more to my taste. It plays more to
the dark side of the story, which there are a
lot of dark elements when you break it down. So
really the only issue I had was the subject matter
of getting over the creepiness of the relationship early on.

(38:48):
But once I figured out that it really wasn't trying
to villainize anybody, and also reading what Priscilla had to
say about this movie being made and it really being
a representation of the story she wanted to tell, I
find myself having more comfort and knowing that it wasn't
somebody making the movie of just trying to monetize off

(39:08):
of that. So that definitely bumped up my scoring. So
for Priscilla, I give it four point five out of
five Gracelands. It's time to head down to movie. Mike
Traylor Paul It's rare that I have an audible gasp
while watching a movie trailer, but seeing Ryan Gosling and

(39:30):
all his glory, like I can admit when a guy
is really good looking, and I feel like Ryan Gosling
and I are not even the same species. I feel
like if I worked out as hard as I wanted to,
I could not achieve even a tenth of the level
of his physique. But for that reason, he makes for
a great actor to throw on a screen and make

(39:51):
me want to watch every single second that he is
on there. But he is in a new movie with
Emily Blunt, and it's a movie that very much reminds
me that Ryan think Gosling is a very diverse actor.
Not only does he take on roles that I feel
challenge him, but he flourishes in them. And with every
project he takes on, he reminds me that he can

(40:13):
really do it all. He can do the comedy, he
can do the action, he can do the drama. He
can sing, he can dance, He can do all these
things so well, and man, it just makes you jealous
that there's a person out there that is so talented.
But the new movie is called The Fall Guy. He
plays a stunt man who's kind of washed up and

(40:33):
now he's working on a movie set with one of
the biggest stars in Hollywood and ironically, he is somebody
who he stunt doubled for a long time ago, and
this guy's kind of replaced him as far as being
the star now, Emily Blunt's character is the one directing
the movie, and where it all comes crumbling down is
the big A List star goes missing and Ryan Gosling

(40:54):
has to find a way to bring this guy back,
and in turn, when the heart of em only Blunt
where it seems like they have some kind of relationships,
some kind of pass where they dated, or he's been
trying to get with her for so long, so if
he brings the guy back, he wins her heart. So
before I get into more of what this movie is about,
also the interesting person who is directing this movie, which
gives me some pretty good perspective on what to expect.

(41:17):
Here's just a little bit of the Fall Guy trailer.
Tom Ryder, the biggest action stall on the planet is missing.
You need to bring him back. On Jodie's movie is Dead. Why,
I mean, you're a stump mad Nobody's gonna notice you.
That's your job, no offense. I mean some taking you
find Ryder, save Joji's film. You get the love of

(41:41):
your life, back. I'm not the hero, I'm just the
double do So. Not only is Ryan Gosling visually appealing
in this trailer, but all the stunts that they get
to play around with, I think are gonna be a
lot of fun. Now, usually when it comes to making
a movie about making a movie, the movie ever turns
out to be good. It's just kind of a lame line.

(42:03):
You have to walk to make it interesting and not
to make it too meta. I've never really seen a
movie about a movie really win me over, But I
think is there seems to be a pretty good story
here underneath it. And the movie is based on the
TV show from back in the eighties. I don't think
it's really gonna follow a major plot line from that,
aside from the fact that Ryan Gosling is playing the

(42:24):
same type of stunt performer. But I think there will
be a lot of things to play around with if
you are doing stunts for a movie. Inside of a movie,
there are scenes where Ryan Gosling's character is set on
fire where he's crashing cars, but then when you go
into him in the real world where he's trying to
find this alis star and bring him back, he is
also doing these same types of stunts, but at that

(42:45):
point it's not on the fictional movie set. It's just
on a real movie set that we are watching. So yes,
it does get a little bit meta to make a
movie about a movie, But just by watching this trailer,
I think they make a pretty clear distinction of what
is happening on set by the way that those shots look.
They look very glossed up and Hollywood like, and then
you pull it back a little bit and there's a

(43:06):
sense of realism. So you have Ryan Gosting looking great,
you have those stunts looking great. You also have a
lot of great wardrobe shots in this movie and the
different outfits he has been put in throughout his entire career.
He has some iconic looks. So that is something I
look forward to now when going to watch a movie.
And maybe it's because recently I've become more interested in
the way that I dress and interested in fashion in general,

(43:28):
which I always just saw it as like, oh, you
have to have a lot of money to know fashion
and to be able to wear nice clothes, But I
think it really comes down to finding your own unique style,
and really fashion is just being intentional and doing something
with purpose. So it doesn't really have to cost a
whole lot. Is something that I've learned so now when
I go watch movies, I often look for inspiration based

(43:49):
on movie characters and what they wear. And of course
I'm not going to get something that cost a crazy
amount that they spend in movies, but looking at what
they wear, it gives me, Okay, what can I find
that I can afford that creates a similar look making
my own and makes me feel confident like I was
on a big screen. I like doing that too, And
just by looking at this trailer and some of the

(44:10):
different outfit choices, which some are a little bit out
there and outlandish, but I always leave a Ryan Gosling
film inspired by what he wears and what they put
him in. So maybe this movie will give me some
choices to pick for him later down the line. And
then you put him with Emily Blunt. I think they
are really great pairing that I haven't seen together on
the big screen. She also rarely makes a bad movie.

(44:31):
Both of them together are two actors who rarely make
a bad movie. If ever, I just have them on
that level of top tier actors. And then you have
director David Leach who we've talked about recently when I
did my review on Bullet Train, which was a really solid,
fun and funny action movie that kind of went a
little bit under the radar when it came out late
last summer, but I feel like more people started watching

(44:54):
that and appreciating it after it came out on Netflix.
But David Leech knows action, and he also he knows comedy.
He's done movies like John Wick, Deadpool two, Bullet Train,
which I mentioned, so I think he's gonna pull from
all those inspirations to make this movie. But the other
cool thing that excites me is David Leech was a
stunt performer back in the day. The first time he

(45:14):
ever met Brad Pitt was working as his stunt double
on Fight Club. So knowing that he has this long
history of being a stunt performer and then directing a
movie about a stunt guy who's kind of past this prime,
I feel like the reason he made this movie was
also to tell his story. And when you get a
director who is passionate about what they are doing and

(45:34):
also pulling from personal inspiration, I think that's a home
run that it's gonna have a lot of heart with
somebody who has the arsenal and the tools of how
to make that movie come to life. So maybe it's
a little selfish of him to make a movie that
hits so close to home, but they always say, right,
work on what you know. So that is why I'm
really interested to see how this entire movie plays out.

(45:57):
The trailer just looks fantastic, and the movie is coming
out on March first, twenty twenty four, so that's why
I'm excited to see it next year. And yes, you're
probably thinking, why do you have such a crush on
Ryan Gosling? And to that, I say, well, who doesn't said?
That was this week's edition of Movie by Tramer Bar
and that is gonna do it for another episode here

(46:17):
on the podcast. But before I go, I got to
give my listeners shout out of the week. We had
an interview last week with Frederick Yahnay talking about his
work on Killers of the Flower move and the process
behind getting music made for a movie. I asked you
to comment with the music note and this week's listener
shout out who left that secret emoji is Ashley Kennedy.

(46:39):
She wrote, enjoyed this interview and can't wait to watch
the movie. So thank you Ashley, thank you all for listening,
and until next time, go out and watch good movies
and I will talk to you later
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