All Episodes

January 22, 2024 45 mins

Recently, Mickey Mouse has entered the public domain after the copyright on Steamboat Willie officially expired. Mike was inspired by this and in this episode shares his Top 5 ideas he has for movies that should be made once these famous characters become public domain. He explains what public domain means and other characters that have recently gone into the public domain and people are already making movies with the characters without being sued. In the Movie Review, Mike talks about Hulu’s Self Reliance Starring Jake Johnson and Anna Kendrick. It’s about a guy who receives an invitation to win $1 million by playing a game where he must outwit hunters attempting to kill him. He realizes the hunters can only attack him when he's alone, but none of his friends and family believe the game is real. In the Trailer Park, Mike gives his thoughts on IF. The movie is about a young girl who gains the ability to see people's imaginary friends, referred to as "IFs" for short, who have been abandoned by the kids they helped.  Mike shares why this looks like it could be one of the best live action kid’s movies in years. 

 

New Episodes Every Monday!

Watch on YouTube: @MikeDeestro

Follow Mike on TikTok: @mikedeestro

Follow Mike on Instagram: @mikedeestro

Follow Mike on Threads: @mikedeestro

Follow Mike on Twitter: @mikedeestro

 

Email: MovieMikeD@gmail.com

 

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mark as Played
Transcript

Episode Transcript

Available transcripts are automatically generated. Complete accuracy is not guaranteed.
Speaker 1 (00:00):
Hello, and welcome back to Movie Mike's Movie Podcast. I
am your host Movie Mike, and today I want to
share with you my top five public domain movie ideas.
If you don't know what public domain is, I'll explain it,
along with some characters that have already entered the public
domain and will be public domain within the next ten, fifteen,
twenty years. In the movie review, what we talk about
Self Reliance, which is a new comedic thriller on Hulu.

(00:23):
And in the trailer park what could be one of
the best live action kids movies in a long time.
It's a movie called If, from director John Krasinski, starring
Ryan Reynolds and Steve Carell. I have a good feeling
about this one. Thank you for being subscribed, Thank you
for listening every single week. Shout out to the Monday
Morning movie crew. Now let's talk movies. In a world

(00:44):
where everyone and their mother has a podcast, one man
stands to infiltrate the ears of listeners like never before
in a movie podcast. A man with so much movie knowledge,
he's basically like a walking imt wo's glasses from the
Nashville Podcast Network And this is Movie Mike's Movie Pop.

(01:07):
I was inspired to do this episode after Mickey Mouse
entered the public domain. What exactly does that mean? Well,
in this case, Steamboat Mickey was introduced back in nineteen
twenty eight, so it's now been ninety five years since
the debut of Mickey Mouse. So now it has entered
the public domain, meaning you can make a movie, you

(01:28):
can make a TV show using Steamboat Mickey, and Disney
cannot sue you because technically the copyright has now expired
for Steamboat Mickey. So in its simplest terms, the public
domain refers to the content, ideas, or creative works that
are not protected by intellectual property laws like copyright or patent.

(01:49):
So this is different from say Nike put out something
ninety five years ago. You can't just start making Nike stuff,
But when it comes to art, you can, whether it
be movies, music, or TV ideas. After ninety five years,
anybody can use them, share them, modify them freely without
the need to request permission or request payment, which is

(02:12):
probably the most important factor in all of this. And
you may be thinking, well, why does law allow this?
This sounds kind of like an infringement on somebody's ideas,
on somebody's creativity, and I had to kind of think
about that too, because if I created something that went
on to build an entire media empire like Disney or

(02:33):
even as we get into some of these other characters
like Marvel and DC, I wouldn't want that taken away
from me. But in the research I did on public domain,
they say that this allows for the widespread availability and
use of creative and intellectual works that goes to benefit
the public. So essentially, something has become so popular and

(02:53):
so great that allowing other people to interpret this art,
to make their own versions, to change it a little bit,
actually benefits everybody. And they also want to limit monopolies
when it comes to characters. If one company just has
control of an intellectual property like this, it's seen as
a monopoly. And in the United States in the world,

(03:14):
monopolies aren't great. So okay, Steamboat Mickey debuted back in
nineteen twenty eight, meaning that all the way through twenty
twenty three you couldn't do anything. So this would be
the ninety sixth year. This is the first year that
you could put out something with Steamboat Mickey, and they're
already working on things. There's a trailer that dropped that
is a horror movie with Mickey as the villain. But

(03:35):
of course there are some rules that you have to follow.
First of all, you have to make sure that the
version you are using is the exact same version that
is public domain. So you have to use the character
design that is over ninety five years old Steamboat Mickey.
You can't go and grab a Mickey from the sixties

(03:56):
or eighties and say, oh, I'm good, he's totally public
go it is only that version. So when we're looking
at some of these works, it has to be the
actual work that debuted ninety five years ago, from that creator,
from that artist, from that author. It has to be
that version, otherwise you will still end up getting sued.

(04:18):
And there are some other gray areas because Disney has
been fighting for the rights for Mickey Mouse to not
be public domain, saying that, hey, this is a part
of our entire brand, so allowing people to use him
will hurt our brand because it's embedded in every single
thing that we do. But still that went away and
it was able to enter the public domain. And this

(04:40):
isn't a brand new concept. It's just now that a
lot more of these iconic characters that we only associate
with one company like Disney. These have now been around
for ninety five years. But there are other examples in
movies and TV that have been public domain for a while.
Now I'll go through some of those now. Characters like Tarzan, Homes,

(05:00):
Alice in Wonderland, Dracula, Hercules, Robinhood, Sleeping Beauty, snow White,
the Wizard of Oz, King Kong. Those are all public
domain characters. So that is why you have seen different
versions of these stories. And that's also why so many
of these have different versions that come out every few years,
because you don't have to pay for the rights to them.

(05:21):
We often associate a character like snow White with Disney,
but in the last ten to fifteen years, we have
seen darker versions of snow White, We've seen spin offs
of it, and it's because that character is public domain.
So anybody is allowed to make a movie for profit
as long as they are doing it based on that
original character in that original source material. That is the

(05:44):
key component here. The other thing we've seen is very
wholesome characters enter into the public domain, and once that happens,
they don't have to be wholesome anymore. There is what
is being called a public domain horror universe happening right now,
and Jagged Edge Productions is behind a lot of these
movies coming out right now. Winni the Pooh Blood and

(06:05):
Honey was a movie that came out that took Winnie
the Pooh and made him a serial killer. It's even
getting a sequel that is introducing Tigger called Blood and
Honey two, which is coming out later this year. They're
also working on Bambi The Reckoning, which looks like maybe
it's gonna be something of Bambi finally getting her revenge.
You also have Peter Pan's never Land Nightmare. All these

(06:26):
movies are becoming a part of this public domain horror universe.
Here are some other characters that people are just itching
waiting for them to enter the public domain in the
next ten to fifteen years. J R. R. Tolkien's The
Hobbit will be public domain in twenty thirty three. In
twenty thirty four, Superman will enter the public domain. Also
in twenty thirty four, James Bond will enter into the

(06:48):
public domain. This is a big one. In twenty thirty five,
Batman will enter in because he first debuted in nineteen
thirty nine's Detective Comics number twenty seven. Captain America will
enter in twenty thirty six. Wonder Woman will enter in
twenty thirty seven, who debuted in the nineteen forty one
All Star Comics. You also have some more Disney characters
like Pluto in twenty twenty six, Donald Duck in twenty thirty,

(07:11):
DC Shazam in twenty thirty five, The Flash in twenty
thirty six, Aquaman in twenty thirty seven, and Godzilla in
twenty fifty. So it sounds like the pressure is on
James Gunn to get this DC universe in order before
all these characters enter the public domain. Imagine if we
could get to a point where all the DC and
Marvel characters are in public domain and we can finally

(07:33):
get that Marvel versus Capcom movie I love that video game.
That would be amazing. But what I want to share
with you are my top five ideas for public domain movies.
These are characters from my favorite movies and ideas that
I would have if I had free reign to use
these characters without having to pay for them. So I'll
give you the character the year that this movie could

(07:55):
potentially come out, because it'll be the first year they'll
be eligible in public domain. I'll give you the title
of my public domain movie and the overall synopsis of
what I think this movie would be about, and I
put them in order from earliest to latest. At number five,
I have my favorite superhero of all time, Spider Man,
who will enter in the public domain in twenty fifty three.

(08:18):
He first debuted in a comic book back in nineteen
sixty two titled Amazing Fantasy, Number fifteen. So this actually
wasn't even the first ever Amazing Spider Man comic, which
this was kind of a throwaway issue. Amazing Fantasy wasn't
really working. They were going to cancel this comic, so
stan Lee was like, all right, I've been working on
this character, Spider Man. Let me just throw him in,

(08:39):
introduce his origin story, and then we'll see what happens.
This issue debuted and people loved it, and the character
was so popular that he went on to get his
own series, The Amazing Spider Man. So he was created
by writer Stan Lee and artist Steve did Go, and
he was an instant sensation with readers. So I would
seek my inspira from this comic, which I think the

(09:02):
movies have really kind of not incorporated all the things
that make Spider Man spider Man from the comics, which,
of course, to make big movie adaptations, you got to
change the character up a little bit, but going back
to the source material, making him a ultra nerd again,
but also reminding people of the level of strength that
Spider Man has. If you read these early comics, he

(09:24):
gets those powers from a spider, which a spider can
do really amazing things and lift things compared to its
body weight. So you take that and put it into
a human. How strong he actually is sometimes isn't showcased
as much as it should be in the movies. The
other thing is his humor. Spider Man has always been
a very witty character and written so well in the

(09:45):
comics that that personality just oozes out of the character.
So I think for this movie, it very much needs
to be a Spider Man high school comedy. Think about
a superhero movie that meets the comedy of and I
would call the movie Peter Parker. We haven't really seen
a movie that just focuses on the story of Peter Parker.

(10:08):
Where in this film, I don't think you do any
of the superhero stuff. I want all of this to
focus on a storyline of him and high school, his
best friend Harry Mary Jane, and all of the funny
situations that happen with that. And I would pull a
lot of the source material from that original Amazing Spider
Man run. In that first issue, there is a situation

(10:30):
he gets into where he gets paid and they make
the checkout to Spider Man, and then he goes to
the bank and tries to cash that check and they
won't cash it for him because they're like, hey, you
need some form of ID, you need a social Security number,
you need a way to prove to us that you
are Spider Man. And he's like, what, this suit isn't
enough and they're like, no, anybody could put on the suit.
So he got paid for doing something as Spider Man

(10:53):
and then can't catch the check. There are a lot
of things in the comics that are very funny like this,
and I think it would be great to show case
some of these moments and not so much about all
the action, the origin story, all the things that we
just expect out of a Spider Man movie. You really
take all of that out and just focus on the
things that would be funny of being a teenager with

(11:13):
super capabilities and helping people, getting into relationships, hooking up
with people, all the things that you do find funny
in a movie like super Bad. Put him in with
the character of Peter Parker, and Peter Parker is also
a very clean cut, straight lace, kind of square guy
who I think Toby maguire really got that across in

(11:34):
his movies. You amplify that up even a little bit more,
and you make Harry Osborne kind of a bad influence.
For some reason, I just have this plotline of Harry
trying to convince Peter Parker the entire time to say
a curse worre Come on, man, I'm gonna get you
to say the F word, and then maybe by the
finally at the end of the movie he actually does.
And the tone I'm thinking in my head if you
remember that scene in Spider Man three where he starts

(11:57):
to become the jerk Peter Parker. He looks so emo
and he does that dance scene with this song, which
at the time this scene seemed like it totally killed
the vibe in this movie, like it totally messed up
the tone. But looking back on Spider Man three, that
is one of the biggest things that we remember. It

(12:18):
is the funniest moment and really is the true essence
of Peter Parker and how funny he actually was. So
you take this same tone and you throw it into
this high school comedy, and I just think that feels
super fresh, super funny. And in twenty fifty eight, which
who knows the superhero movies will still be a thing,

(12:38):
it would feel a little bit nostalgic to have that
two thousand comedy vibe. So at number five, I have
Peter Parker, which could first come out in twenty fifty eight,
at number four on my list of public domain movies.
The group of characters are the teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,
which were introduced in the first TMNT comic book back
in nineteen eighty four by artists Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird,

(13:02):
who financed this entire comic with a tax refund and
a family loan and have created an entire empire of
teenage mutant Ninja Hurtles from TV shows, action figures, movies
and have brought it all the way back around to
the comics and are putting out some really great graphic
novels right now. This one will be a while, but
TMNT will enter into the public domain in twenty eighty

(13:25):
and my idea for a TMNT movie would be a
sci fi action movie. Think about Blade Runner twenty forty
nine meets the Batman with Robert Pattinson, and I would
call the movie TMNT twenty eighty four. So if it
comes out in twenty eighty, it will be set in
the not so distant future, and that is what I envision,

(13:46):
So go with me on this journey. Picture a dystopian
not so distant future in New York City. It's cold,
it's dark, but also an orange haze that hangs over
the city, and at night we have these neon bright

(14:10):
lights take over the scenes. And emerging from the shadows
from underground beneath the sewer are the teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles Leonardo, Raphael Donatello and Michelangelo. And on screen they

(14:34):
are recognizable as those beloved TMNT characters, but their personalities
are so different and darker. They're still teenagers with man.
They have seen some stuff because the future is not
a happy place. The criminals are more hardened, sadistic. Evil

(15:03):
Shredder is a madman taking over New York City and
they must stop them. This also is going to be
a very expensive movie. I'm thinking TMNT movie with a
two hundred and fifty two hundred and seventy five million
dollar budget. I wanted to feel epic, I wanted to
feel grand. I wanted to feel unlike anything you've ever

(15:25):
seen from a TMNT movie. No comedy, just straight brutal action.
People getting decapitated by the Turtles. That is what I
want to see, And sadly, I just don't think we'll
ever get there in our lifetime because they are so
much associated with childhood memories and they're wholesome and they

(15:45):
teach lessons and they're colorful and bright. But the way
I see the teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is entirely different.
Because that first movie that came out in the nineties
had that tone. It didn't really feel like a kid's movie,
but over time they had become more and more cartoonish. So, man,
I would love for this movie to happen. Twenty eighty

(16:06):
is the first year it could happen. My movie would
be called TMNT twenty eighty four. Let's go number four.
At number three, we're going over into the animated side.
The movie is Toy Story, which originally came out back
in nineteen ninety five. It was the first computer animated
feature film released by Pixar and distributed by Walt Disney.

(16:29):
Since the movie came out in nineteen ninety five, my
version could come out in twenty ninety one. Oh man,
that's a long time away. But my movie would be
titled Toy Story Play times over, and it is an
animated horror movie. Think about it as that original movie,
but in a parallel universe where Woody actually kills Buzz

(16:50):
and Toy Story. He tries to just knock Buzz off
so Andy can't find him, and instead of taking Buzz
with him to go to Pizza Planet, he takes Woody
with them. But in my version, Woody actually kills them,
ices them, takes them out, makes them sleep with the fishes,
thinks he gets away with it, but then Old Slink
starts to become a little bit suspicious of Woody and

(17:11):
he tries to crack the case, and at the same
time Woody is trying to tie up Blue Sends. Other
toys start getting killed because they're all good to rat
on Woody. They start to question themselves. Should we get
Andy involved, should we reveal to him that we actually
come alive? And the entire thing ends with Woody dying
by being thrown into a garbage disposal. Why the toys

(17:44):
kill him after he admits the killing Buzz an animated
horror movie. That is what I want to see. Toy
story play times over come to you from Movie Mike's
Productions in twenty ninety one. That's at number three. At
number two. The media franchise here is Pokemon. I grew
up with Pokemon. There's a game series that debuted from
Nintendo in Japan back in February nineteen ninety six. The

(18:09):
actually came out with Pokemon Green and Pokemon Red. In
the US we got red and blue. Oh, I was
much more of a red kid. My go to starter
Pokemon was Charmander. He was the only great choice. And
from the game debut the TV show which is what
set this Pokemon craze on fire. It came out in
nineteen ninety seven. My movie has to be based more

(18:32):
on the TV show than the video game, because I
just draw a lot more inspiration of the way that
show was set up and the way I fell in
love with that show. So what I want to create
is an R rated crime thriller starring Pokemon. Think about
The Departed meets Zodiac and I wanted the movie to
be titled Palettetown, which is where Ash Ketchum is from.

(18:55):
And in my film, Ash turns to a life of
crime after he burned through all all the money he
has won battling his Pokemon, winning all these championships. All
that money is gone. He's got to pay the bills,
so he turns to his team of Pokemon to help
him rob a bank. Because if you think about it,
if Pokemon actually existed in the real world, the first

(19:16):
thing people would think of is how can I use
these for crime? They are essentially weapons. They are essentially
things that you could use to force people to give
you money, to take over countries. They would be used
for war and battle, Oh no doubt. We wouldn't be
going to a Pokemon stadium to watch kids battle their
Pokemon against each other. These would be on the front lines.

(19:39):
So it's probably a good thing that Pokemon don't exist
because they would be a part of our military, and
that is a very dark route to go into. I
wouldn't go fully that route in this movie. I would
just think of the everyday person using them to their
advantage to rob banks, to rob people, to take over
and create their own drug lord media empires. So that
is what you would experience in this movie. You see

(20:02):
his first ever heist go down, which will go a
little bit of rye. I could see Squirtle getting a
bullet to the leg, something very dramatic happening as he's
trying to figure out how to do crime with his Pokemon.
But then he teams up with this evil nemesis, Gary
and together they form a very sophisticated organized crime with
Pokemon as they plan to pull off the most perfect heights.

(20:25):
So you're throwing the Little Ocean's eleven in there, and
that is what I envisioned in this movie. I can
even hear the song and I would maybe think something
like if Lincoln Park did the Pokemon theme song, super
dramatic fits the tone of the movie, makes it a
little bit more hardcore catch them. Although, now that I

(20:48):
think about it, when I hear Lincoln Park singing the
Pokemon theme song, it makes me feel a little bit
more like it's two thousand and seven and we're watching
a Transformers movie, and this song plays it at the
very end game John, which that is another route you
could go down, and I'm kind of surprised we haven't

(21:10):
had a Pokemon movie like that. It very much feels
like a big Hollywood blockbuster with very epic action that
as a Pokemon fan, I think that's what I really
want to see. Instead, in twenty nineteen, we got to
take a Pikachu, which was cute, which was fun, but
we really wanted to see Pokemon being Pokemon and battling

(21:31):
and fighting each other the things we know from the
video game and the TV show. We haven't really had
that yet. So I hope in my lifetime we get
something of that caliber. If not, we're gonna have to
wait until twenty ninety three when Movie Mike's Movie Production
comes out with Palatown, because that is what I have
at number two, but at number one because the most

(21:51):
amount of time would have to pass in order for
this movie to happen. The franchise is Harry Potter, and
at the earliest this one could happen is twenty ninety
because the first book came out back in nineteen ninety seven,
and that would be Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone,
which is the original title. We probably know it more
as The Sorcerer's Stone. But there's kind of a weird

(22:12):
gray area when it comes to books. But I found
when it comes to Harry Potter, the character is protected
by copyright from creation until seventy years after JK. Rowling passes,
so we don't know when that is gonna be, but
whenever she passes away, it's gonna have to be seventy
years until Harry Potter enters into the public domain. So

(22:35):
I'm going back to using the first book as my
source material, looking at the earliest of twenty ninety three.
Since maybe there's the only gray area with Harry Potter,
I'm gonna make a movie about Hermione Granger, who is
the unsung hero of the Harry Potter franchise. In my opinion,
Emma Watson did a fantastic job portraying the character in

(22:56):
the movies, and it's gonna be very highly influential on
my film, which is a coming of age indie film.
Think of The Holdovers, which just came out last year,
meets a Wes Anderson movie, and also the perks of
being a Wildflower, which Emma Watson was also in and
is also a big inspiration in this movie. A very

(23:17):
aesthetically pleasing movie, very bright colors. The magic is very
muted again, kind of like in My Spider Man idea,
not so much of an emphasis on all the wizardry
and the magic and the special effects. It is very
much just a straight ahead drama and coming of age story.
And I just think, if you're gonna make a new

(23:37):
version of Harry Potter, why not focus on her mindy
instead of Harry Because she is a very level headed,
book smart and always logical character. So why not highlight
her intellect and her cleverness and how she can use
her abilities to learn and absorb information to defeat any
possible threat. I think that is what makes her amazing.

(23:58):
So in my head, I have a very indie looking
trailer that has just like that film quality of it
looks like it was maybe made on a really old camera.
And then you have like an indie song from the
two thousands playing in the background with some light hearted,
maybe a little melodramatic voiceover, and I think the trailer
would go a little something like this. My name is

(24:19):
Frmonie Granger. I was just an ordinary muggle born girl
with a love for books and a thirst for knowledge.
Little did I know that my life was about to
take a turn beyond my wildest imagination. You've got the
Hogwarts express Her looking out the window pulling up to Hogwarts,

(24:44):
all indie movies style like that is what I have
envisioned for that movie, and the earliest time that that
could come out twenty ninety three. I just think that
would be an interesting film to follow those early days
at Hogwarts without any of the crazy magic things happening,
less fantasy and just more feel good filmmaking. So those

(25:04):
are my top five public domain movie ideas. I do
have an honorable mention the Incredible Hulk, which would be
public domain in twenty fifty eight, which really is that
far away. The Incredible Hulk debuted in the comic book
series of the same name back in May nineteen sixty two,
created by Marvel comics by writer Stan Lee and artist
Jack Kirby. So I would take the source material from

(25:27):
those original comics and make like an Oscar bait movie
that's a lot of drama and a lot of romance,
and just call it Bruce and I would kind of
create a similar storyline like they did in Age of Ultron,
which I make into some sticky waters there of taking
inspiration from them, but I don't care. Sue me, but
I always just thought that was an interesting plot point
for them to work in and really try to make work,

(25:49):
and I would focus on the idea of them actually
getting away and escaping together and going into hiding. So
the tone I have here is kind of like Marriage Story,
which also stars Scarlett Johanson and Manchester by the Sea,
a movie that's very dramatic and you're not gonna feel
good by the time you finish this movie. So they

(26:10):
run away together. They've been ten years into this relationship,
but it's starting to fall apart. They have a son
who is half human and half Hulk, but then they
end up losing their son, so it's all the fallout
and grief of that. I just think making something that's
seems so fantasy like but making it feel very grounded,
I just think that would be a great take on

(26:32):
the Incredible Hulk story, which has always been a little
bit emo and maybe why it hasn't so much worked
out when it comes to his standalone films. So I
say go full emo and make it an all out drama.
So that is my list. Thank you for indulging me
in these ideas. Well, come back, I'll give my review
of Self Reliance. Let's get into it now, a spoiler

(26:55):
free movie review. Talking about Self Reliance, which is on Hulu.
Survive thirty days while being hunted, Win a million dollars.
That is the premise of this movie. Now, that tagline
is so slick and so smooth, great elevator pitch for
this movie. But sometimes that worries me. When a movie
has that great of a tagline where you can explain
the entire thing in one sentence, I think it's gonna
have a hard time delivering because it's so focused in

(27:18):
on that premise. But in this case, this movie delivered.
It is written, directed, and co produced by Jake Johnson,
who you probably know best from New Girl. I never
watched that show. People have recommended it to me, but
it's one of those shows that I've just not went
back and watch. I really know Jake Johnson more for
his film roles Let's Be Cops with Damon Wayne's Junior,

(27:40):
who was also his New Girl co star. He was
great and safety not guaranteed. Also a movie called Drinking Buddies.
But what I really know him for and what I
would pick out while watching this movie is Peter B.
Parker and into and across the Spider verse. So when
I see him on screen and hear his voice, I
associated with that role and some times also win an

(28:01):
actor directs and stars in a movie. I'm also a
little bit hesitant of it. So two things that I'm
always worry about. This movie had a really great tagline,
because I feel like that's compensating for something later down
the end, and then you have somebody directing and starring
in the movie. But this movie delivered, and what I
really enjoyed about it is it gets right to the action.

(28:23):
This movie is ninety minutes long and waste no time.
You get just a little background on his character as
far as who he is as a person. You get
a glimpse into his life, and then right away this
premise is thrown upon him. He meets Andy Samberg, who
plays himself in this movie, takes him to a warehouse
and you have these two guys who give him this shows. Hey,
you want to play this game. If you survive for

(28:45):
thirty days, you win a million dollars. There are people
who will be hunting him, and the only rule is
they can't kill him if he's with somebody else. You
get right into him playing the game, and then all
the crazy things that he has to do to try
and stay alive and win the money. I also love
movies that give you a question like this and make
you think what you would do. And the entire time

(29:05):
I was watching this movie, I had to go back
and think, like what, I actually played the game, try
and survive for thirty days and win a million dollars.
When I really think about it, I think a million
dollars isn't enough to do this. You can blow through
a million dollars pretty quickly. I would need at least
ten million dollars to even consider it. A million dollars

(29:26):
you could win that on a scratch off down the street,
play in the lottery for something like this where the
consequences are you dying. I need more than a million
dollars because I think for me, I could really play
off of that loophole pretty easily. Being somebody who is married.
This past week, my wife and I have been snowed
in for so long. We have spent an entire week

(29:48):
together where we really haven't been separated that much. So
you throw in maybe going to the bathroom and showering together,
and there you go. I could easily make it through
a week. So they probably we wouldn't find married people
to play this game. That'd be a little less entertaining,
but I definitely think I could do that aspect of it.
I would just want more money to put my life

(30:09):
on the line. But I think that's what a great
movie does. It asks a question, it starts to debate.
It makes you want to share this movie with other
people and think what they would do in these situations,
and the movie does it so effortlessly. It is just
a fun, entertaining ride from start to finish. And this
is one of the only movies that I didn't have
completely figured out by the time the second act started.

(30:31):
Because I would consider this movie a thriller. It's a
very light thriller, and I wouldn't call it a full
on comedy. It has a lot of funny parts, The
character interactions are great. The entire cast is superb in
this movie. It really walks the line between both of
those things, and for me it worked really well. So
for me, it was really refreshing to watch a movie
that was not predictable and kept me guessing until the

(30:54):
very end and kept me engaged and entertained through the
very end. Also, yeah, to think about it's a streaming movie,
and even me, when I try to be as dildated
as I can while watching a movie at home, sometimes
you just get a little bit distracted. If ever there's
a lull in a movie you want to look at
something else, your phone is right there. You don't really

(31:15):
have the same restrictions that you do while in a
movie theater, where my attention is one hundred percent on
what I'm watching. So I feel like sometimes streaming movies
have to be so much better just to keep my
attention and keep me fully engaged. And this movie did that,
which I've found that if I had gone to see
this movie in theaters, I probably would have loved it

(31:35):
even more. And like I said, the movie has a
great cast. Anna Kendrick is a supporting role in this movie,
and I don't know how Anna Kendrick does it, but
any role she has, she is just incredibly charming. She
could play the exact same character in every single movie,
every single TV show, and I would love it. It's
just something about her essence, something about the way she

(31:58):
delivers lines, something about her interactions. It's just so grateful
a movie like this. If there was one thing I
wanted more out of it is for her character to
have more scenes. And I still stand by this that
Hulu has the best movies out of any streamer, and
I'm talking about original movies. If you just go on
Hulu and search through their Hulu originals, you will find

(32:18):
something new and refreshing that's not connected to any franchise,
that's not really banking on the stars in the movie.
It is just great entertainment and movies that are really
pushing the envelope or at least trying to bring a
different perspective to a type of story. This movie did that,
and a lot of the recent movies I've really enjoyed
on streamers have all been from Hulu. So if I

(32:41):
had to go to one streamer to pick original content,
my go to is still Hulu. Now they specialize a
lot in comedies, dark comedies, and a little bit on
the horror side, but I really think they own that
so well to the point that that's what I identify
Hulu with of just having great original movies and if
something is on there to click it and I'm gonna
watch it and probably enjoy it. Now, if I'm looking

(33:03):
for big stars and movies that really resemble what it's
like going to the theater to watch a movie that
level of Hollywood film, I'm going over to Netflix. But
I feel like those are fewer and far between, and
sometimes they just really get behind promoting something like with
Kevin Hart that's just all out terrible, and they're just
banking on the fact that they have a list stars

(33:24):
and they're saying this has been the most watched movie
since since the history of the streamer. That means nothing
to me. Every now and then Netflix will have a
hit or like a hitten Gem in there, but I
just don't really rely on them to go and watch
good movies Max. I really only go to for anything
that's Warner Brothers or DC. They really kind of got

(33:45):
out of the original movie game. They did it a
lot early on in the Pandemic, and then since then
Ma's originals have really gone out the window. I don't
really look to them to watch a whole lot of
new movies. It's really just all the things that were
in theaters, and then they go there eventually, and then
I go over to Apple if I want to watch
something really high quality, also with an A list star,

(34:07):
but that's still a little bit kind of like the
boutique streaming service. They don't have a whole lot over there,
but I feel like it's more on the drama side,
and they've kind of dipped their toes a little bit
in action in comedy. I feel like in the next
two to three years, Apple could be up there with Hulu,
but right now it's like third on the list of
what I go to, and then Amazon, Paramount and Peacock

(34:27):
are all kind of grab bag, but Hulu is still
my number one. In this movie just solidify that for me.
I also love that for me, it really elevated Jake
Johnson in my list of actors that I just enjoy
anything that they are in and now want to see
more of what he is going to direct, because as
a leading actor, he did a really great job and

(34:48):
I feel like he put a lot of himself into
this character. This was a movie that he first pitched
to Netflix back in twenty seventeen. After he wrote it.
He described that early script as Jacob's Ladder meets Bottle Rocket,
WHI Rocket is one of my favorite Wes Anderson movies.
Definitely got some Bottle Rocket vibe and kind of that
nineties independent feel to this. And the crazy thing is
that this movie was shot in nineteen days, less than

(35:10):
three weeks, and as I was saying earlier, the movie
wasted no time and I was really great pacing throughout
the entire film quick ninety minutes. So maybe that nineteen
day filming schedule really added to that pacing of we
don't have a whole lot of time. We got to
go in shoot, get what we need, and then cut
it up in the end, and it came out wonderfully.
And finally, because going into this film, the only thing

(35:31):
I did was watch the trailer, I really didn't know
anything else about what was going to happen, and I
didn't really have the highest expectations of it, and I
think that is the reason I ended up enjoying it
even more, because I didn't expect to feel so novel
and so fresh. So for self reliance, I give it
four out of five missing teeth. It's time to head

(35:54):
down to movie Mics trailer Paul, where have all the
good live children's movies gone. Seems like when I was
a kid, I gotta start yelling at the clouds here.
But when I was a kid, it feels like at
least every couple months, at least every summer, there would
be like a really cool live action kids movie to

(36:15):
get excited about. And now there have been a lot
of blackluster animation movies, maybe because a live action kids
movie isn't as profitable, or now studios really just want
to build franchises and you can't really do that so
much with live action kids films unless they're attached to
a book series. But there's a movie coming out on

(36:36):
May seventeenth, Calls If It is from director, writer and
co produced by John Krasinski. Yes, the guy from the Office,
who is also known for the horror movie franchise A
Quiet Place, but now he is really flexing his muscle
in fantasy in the kids genre. It's about a girl
who can see imaginary friends also known as ifs. Get

(36:58):
it imaginary friends. If she must help these ifs who
have been abandoned by their kids. We also have Ryan
Reynolds starring in this movie, and Steve Carell voices an
if named Blue, who is featured in the trailer and
on the poster. Before I get into more why I
think this movie is going to be a hit, here's
just a little bit of the IF trailer. I'm an
IF get it imaginary friend. Our kids grew up, so

(37:23):
we need new ones. You could save all of us,
all of who and don't say I let him say
it or I think his head may actually explode. Fine,
thank you? You ready for this? This is one of

(37:46):
the best live looking action kids movies I have seen
in a very long time. The premise of this movie
really reminds me of the plot point in Inside Out
that has to do with Riley and her imaginary friend
being Bong. Oh. We all remember the tragic story that
is bing Bong, but I almost feel like this is

(38:07):
a little bit of a ripoff of that. But it's
okay because it's all these imaginary friends who are kind
of abandoned, so it's a little bit of that. And
also toy story really in the mix here, where their
entire dilemma is their kids getting older and no longer
playing with them, which is a toy's worst nightmare. So
an imaginary friend's worst nightmare would be being abandoned by

(38:28):
those kids who no longer believe in them. And I
think this concept will hit with a lot of kids
and that feeling of being lonely to the point where
you need to develop an imaginary friend. It'll also sit
in with adults who maybe had imaginary friends as kids,
which I had an imaginary friend back in the day.
I didn't have a whole lot of real friends growing up.
It was really tough for me to talk to kids

(38:48):
my own age. But in the trailer park I would
run around with a group of kids and my best
friend was named Zach, and we spent so many summers together.
But eventually Zach moved, got out of the trailer park,
went to oh, the coveted place of a real house
with four walls and a roof, I thing every trailer
park kid dreamed of achieving. But his house was in

(39:11):
a town two towns over, so I never saw Zach again.
Back in the day, when your friends would move away,
it was a death sentence that you were never going
to see this person again. There was no social media.
I didn't have parents who would take me to visit Zach.
So anybody moved out of the trailer Park, they were
gone out of my life, and as a result of that,
I decided to create my own friends, an imaginary friend

(39:33):
named Gary. And the weird thing is that eventually Gary
stopped being my friend too and moved away, much like
Zach did. Why did I do that to myself? It
was the only trajectory I knew for a friend that
eventually they would all move away. So hopefully in this movie,
same thing doesn't happen to traumatize kids to go and
see this film, but I think we can all relate
to at some point in our lives creating an imaginary friend.

(39:56):
I loved the character design in this trailer, primarily Steve
carrell character, who is this really big creature, very colorful.
His name is Blue, but in the trailer, in the
poster he looks like a big purple creature. And the
trailer just has this big, whimsical feel to it. And
I love it when movies don't downplay the emotions or

(40:17):
also the brain power of a kid. You don't have
to dumb everything down. Kids are very smart, and I
think when you deliver a story and don't take away,
don't water things down to talk down to them or
downplay a concept, you deliver it just like you would
any film. I think that has a better chance of
resonating with kids because they're gonna get it, they're gonna

(40:37):
understand it, probably a lot more than you think they will.
So this is the type of movie we need to
be making more to give kids an inspirational movie that
they're gonna have with them for the rest of their lives.
This is a movie that it came out when I
was a kid, it would stick with me and end
up being one of my favorite movies, and I haven't
even seen the movie yet. The other thing that surprised

(40:58):
me about this movie is sometimes a project like this
comes out and it has all these A list actors
attached to it, and that's really all they're banking on. There. Look,
Ryan Reynolds is in this movie. Steve Carell is voicing
a character. You have Bobby moynihan, Emily Blunt as a unicorn,
Matt Damon as a flower, John Stewart as a robot,
Sam Rockwell as s dog, Aquafina as Octocat, Vince Vaughan

(41:23):
is in the movie. It doesn't really look like it
has that same cheap quality of them just trying to
sell all the A list stars to convince you to
go watch this movie, and then really just giving a
lackluster performance. And maybe it's because it's from director John Krasinski,
who probably has a little bit more of a relationship
with all the people in this movie, seems to have
a passion for directing and wanting to create something unique.

(41:44):
He did it so well with the Aquiet Place movies,
so it's an entirely different genre. I would assume he
would want to do it well to be able to
make more movies that are outside of just making horror movies.
And the other thing I'm loving about this movie right
now is the poster. Making a great movie poster is
a lost art right now. I hate the trend that
is just making the character posters. I posted the character

(42:08):
posters recently on my instant story for the Madam Web movie,
and it's just Dakota Fanning and Sydney Sweeney's just faces
and the name of the movie. It in no way
does anything that makes me want to go see this movie.
A great poster is one that evokes emotion, whether it
be happy, sad, angry, upset, scared, and also some level

(42:31):
of curiosity of what the movie is going to be
about and entice you to want to go see that movie.
Great image on a poster goes a long way, and
that is what they did with this movie poster. It
features Steve Carell's character and his large purple hand opening
a window from the inside of a house with a
light shining on the window with the name of the movie,
and under that is the phrase a story you have

(42:53):
to believe to see. The movie is being described as
the tale of a man who can see and talk
to people's imaginary friends, befriending those who have been forgotten
about or discarded. However, some imaginary friends, lacking love and friendship,
turn to the dark side, and it's up to Ryan
Reynolds character to save the world from those that become evil.
If has a runtime right now of one hour and

(43:15):
thirty minutes and it's coming out on May seventeenth, and
I don't care if I'm the only thirty two year
old without kids and attendance head that once this week's
edition of Movie Line tram or Bar and that is
gonna do it for another episode here of the podcast.
But before I go, I gotta give my listeners shout
out of the week. How do you become a listener
of the week and get a shout out? All you

(43:36):
have to do is tag me on your instant story
listening to a recent episode, whether it be the episode
that comes out on Monday like this one, or any
other previous episode that you go back in the library
and check out. Because there are a lot up there.
We are over two hundred episodes into this thing now,
so tag me there. Comment on the clips I post
every week on Reels and TikTok. This week's listener shout

(43:59):
out to us via a Facebook comment I got last
week on a clip from my Mean Girl's review, and
it is Jill Aller. And Jill wrote, my thirteen year
old inter friends saw it this weekend and were completely disappointed.
They loved the original, they did not enjoy the musical
aspect and wanted more OG characters. So I found that
really interesting because I thought that the younger generation would

(44:22):
want to see more of the new actors and the
singing and all the things in that movie that were
really put in to cater more to gen Z, whether
it be the use of TikTok or just the dynamics
in high school to make them feel more modern, So
I'm quite surprised that your thirteen year old wanted to
see more of the two thousand and four version and
those characters coming back. It's also just interesting to see

(44:44):
the amount of people that were surprised and didn't know
that that was going to be a musical. I honestly
thought the musical elements were going to be the things
that really defined this movie and the things that people
were loving because it made it feel different than the
original movie. Was surprised of how many people just wanted
a direct, normal remake. So curious to see how this

(45:07):
will affect other films who have been turned into musicals.
Will they still make musical adaptations of those or is
this just telling Hollywood naw, let's just do normal remakes.
But appreciate that perspective. Jill, thank you for listening, Thanks
to the Monday Morning Movie crew, and until next time,
go out and watch good movies and I will talk
to you later.
Advertise With Us

Popular Podcasts

Dateline NBC
Death, Sex & Money

Death, Sex & Money

Anna Sale explores the big questions and hard choices that are often left out of polite conversation.

Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

If you've ever wanted to know about champagne, satanism, the Stonewall Uprising, chaos theory, LSD, El Nino, true crime and Rosa Parks, then look no further. Josh and Chuck have you covered.

Music, radio and podcasts, all free. Listen online or download the iHeart App.

Connect

© 2024 iHeartMedia, Inc.