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October 3, 2022 62 mins

It’s a TGIF reunion! The Pod Meets World crew is joined by Step by Step’s Christine Lakin (aka Alicia “Al” Lambert) to reminisce about being the new kids on the Friday night block.

They share experiences of what it was like returning to school as a TV star, teen heartthrob paintball wars, secret set tricks and kissing a co-star! (ooooh!)

Plus Christine, a BMW guest star herself, recalls a story that scarred her for years, while Will shares a little “undapants” TMI that will affect Danielle forever.

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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Episode Transcript

Available transcripts are automatically generated. Complete accuracy is not guaranteed.
Speaker 1 (00:16):
Always fly in the same underwear I fly. I fly
to somewhere, like to a place in Captain America, and
I fly home in Spider Man. Oh my god, No, no, okay,
I'm this is a real question. You're kidding, right, No,
absolutely not. I love it. You fly somewhere, so that

(00:36):
means you have multiple Captain America underwear. I have one
Captain America and one Spider Man. So I my my
my to the destination is Captain America and my home
from the destination is Spider Man. Always. I always have
a D twenty three D twenty on me. I have
certain rituals that I always It's one of the Doe,

(01:00):
so I always have one on me. I've always got
my Marvel underwear. I've got to I've got a ritual.
Well I do. Oh my god, I love you. So
you can never like d C underwear would be anathema,
right like I've got some deep No, I've got I've
got a great oh Man. One of my favorite underwear.
I literally have Batman underwear with a removable cape. So
there's a there's a cape over the button, over the butt,

(01:22):
a small Batman cape over the Where do you find these?
They do not. I cannot believe they make grown Man
they do underpants. It gets work because not only not
only do I find them, but my wife will also
buy them for me. Okay, I want to I want
to break down the cape over the butt. Okay, flying
it might be. It's got it's little. It's got a

(01:45):
little utility belt around it, like a little Batman utility belt. Um,
it's the way it should be. I've got a cape
on my chair. Look at my chair. My chair is
Batman drinking again again, just because the next time I
fly with Will, I don't want to think about the
fact that I know what underwear and now I do
I will. There you go, you're gonna know. I have

(02:09):
a pair of Deadpool underwear that I wear when I
do our panels too. I'm sorry. The question for me becomes,
you don't have lucky underwear that you wear for certain things? Wow?
Not interesting? Great? Great Deadpool, I've got a really good Um,
I like the fun kind of underwear or underwear as

(02:30):
I like you said underwear. I did. I absolutely did
like the Bob Ross ones are great until I kind
of heard that his family kind of gets screwed out
of the royalties so I don't really wear my Bob
Ross ones anymore. Um so I was like, yeah, that's
not cool. But oh yeah, no you I run the
game and I've got some d C stuff. I had
my eye and a great pair of Aquaman shorts, but
the underwear, but they were gone, Like you turn your

(02:52):
back and they're gone. So you gotta jump on that
when you get the chance. Pretty much. Yeah, well all right,
these were things I never never knew and probably never
needed to know, but um, somehow I'm actually really happy
I know them. Well. I've always heard that, like actors
are suspicious people. You know, they're superstitious, superstitious. Sorry, yeah,

(03:16):
wait a second, superstitious people. I mean you know you
have there's so many rituals, right, like everyone has their
lucky socks, everyone has their like you can't say the
Scottish play in the theater. You know, there's all these traditions.
And it's like, yeah, because you have to make something up,
you have to court in something magical. You have to
completely convince your brain that like, oh I'm actually this

(03:38):
person on stage right now, or I'm experiencing this real emotion.
I mean that is a superstitious process, Like that I had,
and that's bad, but it also gets bad too because
I had a hat that I wore for every single
recording session I did for every animated series I did,
or every voice over four years. And I was sitting

(03:59):
there one time wearing it and one of the actors
turned to me and said, if you lose that hat,
are you never gonna work again? Like what's going to happen?
And it got into my head where I was like, oh,
I need to break this habit of wearing this thing
every time because in my head, I'm gonna be like
my hat fell apart, I'm never So I literally just
started to not wear it because it got to be
a thing, and it was like, yeah, it can't be
a thing. The underwear is more just fun. It's not

(04:20):
like anything bad's gonna happen to me if I'm not
wearing it, but it will. Yeah, just saying I don't
have any of those I don't have any of nothing.
You don't have any rituals that you do at all whatsoever?
Like nothing, And I'm not talking because there's something like
Chris Farley was famous for apparently being kind of O
C D where when he would go onto the stage,

(04:40):
run out of the stage for SNL, he had to
touch certain things a number of times, lick certain things
the number of times, like it got to a mental illness.
Whereas but you don't have anything where it's like, all right,
there's always change in my left pocket, or there's always
the I wear this or I do that. No showtime
rituals at all. Well, like I definitely have designated pockets
for stuff, but that's not like that's just a organizational tool.

(05:00):
That's an organizational tool. Yeah. No, No, there's nothing. There's
no ritual, there's no magical like you know, I don't
even knock on wood. You know, I've noticed you knock
on wood, and although I knock on wood all the time.
I mean, I liked our traditions backstage. I liked our
or you know you will you and I had our
handshake are high five, yeah, and we pretended to bash
our foreheads into each other. Yeah, the football high five,

(05:22):
football high five, right, uh, and then we did the
screen backstage. But yeah, I mean I think when we
were on Boy Meets World, I did have more of them,
because I think there was consistency to Boy Meets World
where I could have something like you know, I think
for a long time I wore that a Yin Yang
thumb ring. I think I was like obsessed with making

(05:44):
sure I had that thumb ring on for a while,
and I was I had it. It was like, well,
I'm never taking it off, and I think, maybe we're
gonna see this on the show. This is quite possibly. Yeah,
I had the same necklace for years. Yeah, you wear
the same necklace. I think I did. I don't remember it.
I don't remember exactly what it was. But I definitely
had a thing about gum. I chewed gum all the time,
and yet you know, obviously you shouldn't chew gum on camera.

(06:06):
So I think I had a thing about like always
having a piece of gum in my mouth until right
before we went out. Then it probably went on the
gum wall um and so I know, I know I
I probably had more of them then. Where you know,
every week you're doing the same thing, and it's easy
to get into like I like to do this thing. Uh,
but when you know, and I did for a long
period of time, insist on stopping my gas in the car,

(06:27):
like when I would get gas on an even dollar amount,
and I inherited that from my mom who likes and
but then I would have this anxiety if it went
over by a penny, and then I'd have to go
up to another dollar. And then there were multiple times
my car gas tank overflowed, gas pouring out of the
side of it because I was trying to get to
an even dollar amount until one day, I literally just

(06:48):
one day said this is dumb. I'm not doing it anymore,
and I haven't done it since, so I don't. I
still do it just for fun to see if I
can stop. Like to me, it's more personal failure like
ah fifty one like but other than that, yeah, it's
I'm it's not like a thing. I just I like
to see the zeros. Well, welcome to Pod Meets World.
I'm Daniel Fishel, I'm right or Strong, and I'm Wilfredell.

(07:09):
I am so excited about our guest today. I say
that every week, but it's true. We've got so many
amazing guests and I'm I'm always excited about them. Um.
We have Christine Laken with us today who played al Lambert.
Her full name was actually Alicia Lambert, which I don't
think I knew that. I think I just always knew
her as Al Lambert. She did a hundred and sixty

(07:31):
episodes of Step by Step, which was by two episodes.
They also did seven seasons and um. She has also
heard on Family Guy as Joyce Kinney, and she is
now directing for shows like The Goldberg's and High School Musical,
The Musical, The Series, and most importantly today, She guest

(07:54):
starred on an episode of Boy Meets World called Getting
Hitched in season six. So please welcome Christine Lincoln. Oh
my gosh, it's so nice to see you. It's so

(08:16):
nice to see you all. You just had a big weekend.
You were I'm really tired. Tell me tell us about
your weekend. Um, my son turned four. Your baby is four.
I can't believe it. It really makes me want to cry. Um,
he turned four, and we were going to have a
pool party at grandma and Grandpa's because you know it

(08:37):
would spend only a hundred and five. But when you're
thinking as a parent, you're just like, yeah, yeah, I'm
gonna make this happen. Well, what can we do pool time?
So I had the whole thing set up and then
Saturday was rain right, that's right, the one one day
in four years. It rains. It's work. People out with
me all the time with these parties. So I'm like driving,

(08:57):
you know, on Friday, and I'm realizing it's rain and
I'm like cold calling magicians. I'm like, I'm like calling people, like,
do you know any entertainment? What can I do here?
So I found someone, Sam Shazam showed up. He was great.
I don't even need to know what he do. Amazing.
So we had the party on Saturday and that was
really nice. And then yesterday I hosted the Burbank International

(09:21):
Film Festival. Incredible, Yes, and there were some really exciting
movies in this festival, I have to tell you. So
it was very fun. But it was a very long weekend. Yes,
that's a long weekend for sure. So I'm excited. So
I was talking about you last night with my husband
because we you know, Jensen carp is one of the

(09:41):
executive producers of this podcast, and we were talking about
having you on, and he said, where did you and
Christine meet? And I went, I don't know. I had
the exact same thought. Honestly, this morning, I was like,
when did I actually meet Christine? It was like no,
he just kind of were in each other's lives like
all the time. But I had no idea when it
first happened. And that's so that's what I was going
to ask. Is this just a thing for all of

(10:03):
us nineties kids who grew up doing this stuff? Do
we just not remember where we where we met or
do you actually have a memory of it, Christine, I,
I don't have a specific memory of the day that
like we all met, but I do know for a
fact that because of us being in the same block
of t G I f I feel like we went
to certain ABC parties together, Like there were you know,

(10:28):
there were things like that. Um, I definitely remember, Um, Danielle,
you and I would go to some charity events. I
have so many great pictures of us at charity events,
like around Halloween when we would hand out yeah, bowling
Halloween where we handed out candy to people. Um, I
do remember. I think that's I think, because yeah, That's
the other thing is that I'll say to Jensen like, oh,

(10:49):
probably one of those parties, and it's like, we really
sound like we were partying in the nineties and we
really weren't. But there were a lot of I guess
functions where they were bringing us all out everyone from
even not even just the t G I F block,
but like kind of all the ABC stars and shows,
and there were ABC events and and then that was

(11:09):
just the network events. There was also like Tiger Beat
would do an event. Yeah, and then like Ronald McDonald
was always a really big one. My mom was very into,
you know, me doing things for a charity and um
and I always really enjoyed that too, so we did
a lot of Make a Wish and things like that.
You have to remember I lived in Atlanta, so I

(11:29):
didn't have any friends in l A really, and so
all of these events were kind of like my social outlet.
I would meet people and see people. But it's very
strange because now, I mean she would take pictures at
all of them, and I was going through stuff last
year because they were my parents were moving out of
my childhood home. The pictures I found some of these

(11:49):
events with like people of all kinds. I mean it
was like people from the cast of Melbury's Place and
like Tatiana Ali Jenavanoy, like any kid that was on
a show, like the kids from Roman Improvement. Yes, lots
of those were you. I have a question going back
to when we met in the weird places we would
hang out. Were you at the famous like Tiger Beat

(12:12):
paintball day where they just handed us all that was
so much fun shooting at each other. You can paintball there.
I finally know I had tennis ball sized welts on
my body. We went paintball, dude. One of the most
vicious things I still have ever seen to this day
is Jenna FNOI who I think I might have been

(12:34):
dating at the time. I don't know if we had
broken up yet, but we were definitely still friends. Was
forgot you dated Jenna? I did. Yeah, we're on with
both of your red Toyota Selica confirmed. Yes, No, she
had white. She hers is white. I was ready. Hers
was red. I thought you had watching. I'm almost positive
hers was red because I knew all I knew from
my whole life. All I wanted was a red Toyota

(12:55):
Celica convertible. But I thought, and I thought it was
because of Jenna, but maybe it was. You might have
mine wasn't a convertible. Well you'll see it. I still
have it. Anyway. Jenna and I lived like next door
to each other. She's the best She's like the nicest
person in the world, the weird world, which is why
what I witnessed was so horrifying, which was we're on
different teams, and she like falls down and goes like

(13:16):
hang on, hang on, and so the ref comes over.
It's like okay, and she stands up and walks away.
She's about six feet away, and the ref goes all right,
game on, and Shiloh pops up out of nowhere and
pops her twice in the back from five feet away,
and just her and down and Shilo running away there

(13:36):
But you don't remember being there. You were, you were there.
It was it was where I want to say, we
drove up together. It was some like far away. I
think he was like an angel and Vicky was like
an angel and Vicky thing because then it started a
bit of a session for me. Yes, it was like
exactly like a Castaic or on the way to Vegas
or something. And the guy and I I forget his name,

(13:58):
which is so terrible, but the guy, the kid from Baywatch,
had like his own guns and like brought his own stuff,
and we were like, okay, let's stay away from this kid.
Like he was like the kid from who the guy
from Baywatch, Jeremy Jeremy Jackson. Jeremy Jackson. Jeremy Jackson was
armed to the teeth. Um. So yeah, I don't think

(14:19):
I went to that. I do remember getting invited because
Vicky would like, come and do step aerobics with us
Aerobics by Step Yes new T shirt. She would go
see and her husband had that that company, and they
would go and they would train realize for our listeners,

(14:43):
for our listeners. You've heard us talk about this a
couple of times. We had Angel and Vicky who owned
like their own personal training company. It was personal and
they were they were hired by I don't know who,
the production company or Disney with the studio and and
they would go around to all of the different sets

(15:04):
and train the kids for their pe time and you know,
basketball with you or if you wanted to do step aerobics,
which I did. They of course you wanted to do
step around. One day I got it. I was like Angel,
I should actually work out and we like get push up.
There's like one time and it was always just like

(15:24):
hanging out. Thomas thrown elbows. Yeah. I think I was
scared of the paintball because I think. I remember Jen
telling me she got welts and I was like, that
doesn't I don't think I can do it. I think
I'll perish. It was vicious. I mean it was just
like a double tap to the middle of the back.
At five, it started for me a bit of a
paintball obsession. I went multiple times, did you really, Oh yeah,

(15:48):
I think there's a picture of me somewhere on like
the cover of a paintball magazine. That's actually it's at
the place where you play paintball. Come all right, you
have to find that, man, I don't think I do
have to find that, um right now. Yeah. Another thing
we have noticed about us child actors is that a

(16:09):
lot of us seemed to have started acting at the
age of ten. How old were you when you started
acting and how did you get into it so professionally,
I think my first job I was eight. We moved
to Atlanta. When I moved to Atlanta when I was six,
and um, I you know, I was always very tiny,
so doing like team sports was a little bit of

(16:31):
a challenge. So my mom got me involved in dance
because it's like, while we moved to New City, like
get involved in something and So I was doing lots
of dance and I saw that there were acting classes
at this studio and I wanted to know what that was.
And I had been doing I mean, I've been putting
on plays on like under the mantel of the fireplace
my whole life. So my mom basically said, it's, you know,

(16:51):
class where you act out characters. I'm like, oh my god,
like Carol Burnett signed me up. I basically started acting classes.
After a couple months, the teacher said, you know, I'm
also a manager, as as many of them. And she
said I I have you thought about from your kid
in commercials? And my parents were like, you know, I
roll not really. Well she seems to like it. Well

(17:13):
we'll go on a few. We'll just do it for fun.
I book a bunch of national commercials. My mom finally says, well,
maybe we should get an agent. So that I kind
of fell into it in that way. And then I
was doing lots of theater in Atlanta, and then I
booked a couple like small movies that came through, and
I was doing with my theater company, doing a show
at a resort in South Georgia, and a manager from

(17:35):
Los Angeles happened to be there with her family vacationing,
and and then you know, she my mom just decided
to they hit it off. They decided to just keep chatting.
And a year later, my mom brought me out for
spring break to do some like auditions and like make
a demo tape because there was no zoom and I
looked across the country. So I made this like beta max,

(17:57):
you know, tape of me doing this monologue and like
crying and whatever. And Bob Boyett happened to see it,
and I mean talk about it's all kid, isn't um?
He saw it, uh randomly from the control booth um
And two months later they were casting. Step by step
they had cast someone else in the role and she

(18:20):
couldn't do it, and they pulled out and they was
like the last person to be cast. I've seen everyone,
and finally the Bob boy it was like getting me
that girl who was crying in the monologue, Let's see her.
So I get home one day and they're like, my
dad's like, they want to see you in Los Angeles
for a for a TV show. And I'm like, well,
that's ridiculous. No one flies across the country to audition

(18:42):
for a TV show, and my dad was like, you know,
we got the frequent flyer miles, like, go for it minute,
why not? It's unless you don't want to, that's fine too.
So I was like no, I mean I kind of
want to. So I came out, I auditioned, and literally
the next day I had the job. Wow and Miller
boy Yet at the time, Yeah, Miller Boyette was like,
it's like being found by the biggest of the biggest

(19:04):
in TV. Mean, Miller Boyette was doing everything, I mean
legend like Happy Days of Vernon early, like all of
the shows. So yeah, it was and wild and so
then did you move to l a full time? Did
your family come? How did that work? Then? So my
mom came out with me. We obviously we shot the pilot.
Um and then it's like Stacy Keenan, and it's like

(19:24):
all these people like Stacy Keenan, I'm like, oh my god,
you know, I'm like I'm like freaking out, Like I
had watched her growing up, um, And you know, I
kind of knew who Susan Summers was because I used
to watch reruns of Three Company. I was like a
real rerun kid, like I watched everything. I didn't watch
Dallas obviously, but enough of my mom's friends told me
who Patrick Duffie was, um and so and so, you know,

(19:46):
Stacy Keenan's mom was like, oh, these pilots, they never
got it, kid. Yeah, and my parents were not in
the business like they wanted to just you know, keep
me very normal. So we decided to. When it got
picked up, we got an apartment. We lived in the Oakwood. Yeah, Oakwood,

(20:07):
Oh goood. You know, you just rent everything like corporate housing.
So we lived there for a little while. And then
after you know, a few months we've been doing the show,
we got robbed at the oak Wood. At the Oakwood
tell the story. I don't know. I've never heard about
a rod haven't either. I thought it was that was
frowned upon the dark underbelly of the Oakwood. Well, we

(20:30):
lived in the one in the Marina because we worked
the first couple of years we were at Culver Studios.
I don't know, Okay, I don't know. Like then I
was going to Venice Beach all the time. I was
like buying like the Crystal next lived. I lived at
the Marina del Rey Oakwood for a season. Yeah, you
did really Yeah, pre pre Boy Meets World, when I
was filming a show called Julie with Julie Andrews, I

(20:52):
lived at the Marina del Rey. Uh as well, yeah
they must have been Yeah, yeah, were at the Yeah
we are Cool City Studios. Yeah it was yeah. Yeah.
Did you also get robbed there? Then let's get back
to Christine's robbing. Christine, Please, I'd like to hear about
you getting robbed. Well, we come home from rehearsal and

(21:21):
like my mom, I'm like doing homework or something. My
mom keeps asking me if I've seen stuff, Christine. Have
you seen the stamps? No? Have you seen my cameras?
They stole your stamps, damps y'all. They were mailing so
many things. They had so many things to mail um
and your camera. Yes, because they're friends. Uh So, then
my mom's like, check your jewelry and I'm like, huh

(21:42):
so I go on my little with all my little
necklaces and things, and everything's gone, as crystals from my
game boy is gone, my mom video parents gone, like
it was, you know, not all the things, but it
was you know. So so they either very clean robbers
or was your house just regularly looked like it had

(22:03):
been ransacked. It didn't look landsacked. It was only like
when you opened the drawers you saw the look clean thiefs.
Did they did? I'm sorry, this is where my mind goes.
Did you go to like the security. Did they check
the tapes? Did they do like all the whole thing,
or was like, hey, security, I like security. He's obsessed
with security. He wants to know about security. I want

(22:25):
to know what security situation is. Did they check the tapes?
I don't think there were even tapes back though the
dead bolt had been tampered with, But they thought, because
you know, they were all those gates, like good security
system there, good security system. The cops thought maybe it
was an inside job. I was gonna say, it's probably
knew it was your mom try and scare you out

(22:49):
of Los Angeles. Someone had knocked on the door a
couple of nights before and either trying saying they were
selling something or looking for an apartment, and oh they
had they were totally casing when we were gonna But
here's what happened. So my mom is obviously like really distraught.
It was scary. I was like, I've been in Los

(23:11):
Angeles for a month and a half and like we
got robbed. Like this does not bode well. And what
I will say about like not only those producers like
Miller Boy, yet that show they rallied around us. They
got out of that least, they literally put us up
in a hotel and then they took my mom and
like with somebody, and they showed her like two or

(23:33):
three apartments and like they had people from the production
company guys. They came over and got all our stuff out.
Oh my gosh. And then I sound environment. It was
just really lovely. And then like I remember walking, you know,
into rehearsal like the next day, and Patrick Duffy had
a m like a Best Buy bag. It was a

(23:53):
different kind of store, but he had bought me a
new game Boy. I was just like really yeah. So
then we moved to Park Lebria, which is like the
other it's like the yuppy like townhouses. Right, would they
have better Do they have better security? I was going
to ask, they had really good security. We lived in
the big towers and they were like the old from

(24:13):
like nineteen I don't know when those are built nineties
or something. I had outside my windows like a view
of the Angeline poster. Yeah the best. I love that. Yes,
so crazy, And you know it was fine. It was
just a lot of older people lived there, so we
basically lived with like it was like and I felt
like we lived in like a geriatric And so what
year was Yeah? Were you guys? Wait? Wait? Were years?

(24:37):
The first season? Ninety one? Okay, I thought I started.
And so it sounds like just from the little bit
you've told us, it sounds like the environment on set
was really great. But tell us more about what it
was like on that set. What was the environment like,
do you have a favorite memory? Who were you closest
to and who did you hate? Who was the worst?
Give us some juicy juicy detail. Um, yeah, we were

(25:01):
all we were close and it was it was really idyllic,
I have to say, like we had a very close
knit family. Um, a lot of those people had worked
for Miller way up before. Um. We had Anger. She
was like our like craft services lady. She was Swedish,
so lovely and she would be like, you know, she
was just like a mama, like she was making things

(25:21):
for anyone and everyone, and you know, six kids on
a show. It was like there was a lot going on. Um,
and we had three different studio teachers. I shared a
school room with Brandon call He never wanted to do
any work. Um. I was in this like school in Atlanta,
and they were still faxing all my information and FedExing everything.

(25:43):
We would always go back to Atlanta, so once every
three or four weeks we'd have a hiatus. My parents
are like. My parents were like, here's the deal. We're
not going to disrupt our life. The most important thing
is her education. And she's in this private school in Atlanta,
and we're not just move out here, like basically on
your whim, so on your dime, you'll send us back

(26:04):
and forth. And they were like okay. So I back
home like every fourth week and had a normal life.
And then I lived, you know in Atlanta from like
like February through July. UM. So, but anyway, this set
like set life was really fun. I mean I don't
have brothers and sisters, so it was definitely it was
like a brand new world to be around that many

(26:26):
kids all the time. So like Stacy and Angela had
a teacher, the two little boys had a teacher, Josh
and Chris. And then I was with Brandon, and he
was like always like reading like car magazines and like
whatever he would like read them behind is like math book.
I mean all right, So I have to ask, since
you met Brandon, since you you've talked about Brandon, Um

(26:47):
from one sitcom older brother to another sitcom older brother. Um,
Jason Marsin, I think was you know who's still my
Dusty was on the show and I think he was
there when Brandon got shot. Yes, can you talk about that? Yeah,
Brandon call got shot like a drive by shooting in
a car. We had some weird moments that happened. So

(27:09):
I believe this was like the second to last year. Um. Yeah,
Jason Nick come on the show playing Rich Halkey, such
a great energy. Um. Just loved Jason was great. Um
and uh, and Brandon was one night, you know, Brandon
always had fancy cars, that was his thing. And one

(27:29):
night he was driving home he got in some kind
of altercation with someone on the road, some kind of
road rage altercation, and they ended up kind of like
he and this other person were like kind of racing
on the road and and Brandon thought he got away
from this guy and turned into a neighborhood and ended
up being a dead end and when he turned around

(27:51):
in the col deside of the person was waiting for him,
and so he just like drove really fast as he
past as he could pass him, and he kind of
put his head on like this, and the guy shot
him like six times and heard there Yeah, I went
like went through one arm and out the other side
and hit the other arm and yeah, yeah, And he

(28:13):
was really lucky that he survived that. He drove to
a police station. How do you know where a police
this is pre GPS, you guys, like, oh my gosh,
six times yeah yeah, and basically just like got out
of the car and like like passed out on the steps.
It was wild. Ye. So you know, I will say,

(28:34):
like I don't know for sure, but I really feel
like that in some ways. I mean, that will change
you as a person. Um, a traumatic event like that,
and I feel like he, um, he just really had
no interest in being in the spotlight anymore. Can't blame him,
I mean yeah, I mean yikes. Yeah, um so yeah,

(28:55):
that was kind of crazy. And when was that? That
was probably nine the six Okay, so he's been you
guys have been doing the show for five or six
years at that end, Yeah, totally. And he was at school,
you know, I was like I think I was probably
almost like a senior in high school or something in
the school room together anything. Um, which is like really
when we were all like in school together, we were

(29:17):
all like hanging out a lot and going and playing
jokes and pranks. And then when the older girls, you know,
we're out, Brandon was out, and it was just like
me and the two littles, you know. And I was
like deep in high school and so I would have
like a million tutors and I was like underwater all
the time, writing to some freaking paper or whatever. And
were you still by like the time you were in

(29:38):
fifth sixth season, were you still going home every fourth
week to Atlanta? Wow? You kept that pace up through
all seven seasons. Yes, And it started we like ended
up just keeping an apartment in Los Angeles because it
just became you know, so crazy. Um. And but yeah,
I would go back and forth all the time, and
you know, it was I think like, at the end
of the day, when I think about it now, I

(29:59):
think it was really smart on my parents part, because
I don't feel like I really as much as I
missed of like a normal life for normal high school. UM.
I still have very vivid memories of that, and my
time there, especially like in the spring, was so concentrated,
UM that it really felt like I kind of had
the best of both worlds. Try I would say to

(30:20):
my mom, I can't go back to Atlanta. I don't
have any friends, and then I'd go back, and then
I would love it there, and I'd be like, I
don't want to go back. I don't have any friends.
But I know because I mean, I had a very
similar experience. I wasn't going back to Atlanta. I was
just going back to Calabasas High School. But I also
every week went back to my regular high school, so
I got to go to every football game, every school dance.
I I have very vivid memories of being in high

(30:42):
school UM. And also was still able to work, so
I also feel like I got the best of both worlds.
It's very hard and while you're in it, because there
there is no any sort of like, well, I'm behind
a week now, but that's okay, I'll make it up,
but you know a month from now, like you really
have to be on exactly with where you're school is.
But it does make it does make you feel like
you get to really like live a normal life totally.

(31:05):
Did you feel like when you went back to school
and maybe like real school, did you ever feel how
what was the vibe like, do people care? Where they like?
Who cares? No? I mean, it was a lot of
the same kids I had gone to junior high school
with in junior high junior high they cared a little
bit more because I was also brand new to Calabasas.
I had come from Orange County, so I didn't know anybody,

(31:26):
even from elementary school. And it was kind of like
I got there and was already on the show or
had just started the show, and so they didn't quite
understand it. They were like, what are you doing? Where
do you Why do you get to leave for three
weeks and then just appear. But by the time I
got to high school, we were in three, season three
or season four, and nobody cared anymore. So it was
just like Danielle's back and and you know, it was
no big deal. But yeah, it's it's interesting. I also

(31:48):
feel like in l A it's kind of a different
so yet you know, or they're like they care, but
they really like they pretend like they don't care. Atlanta. Yeah,
there's a whole another story, a whole other follow us.
I mean, imagine this. I started seventh grade at a
brand new school, and I'm also on this TV show
that like is the prime audience. Like everyone there's the

(32:10):
target audience. And so I remember going to my locker
the first day because I wasn't there for the first
three weeks of school or whatever it was. So this
the build up had been happening, this girl and she's
not here, but she's new when she's on a TV show,
and what this is crazy? And I remember like putting
something in my locker and like turning around and there
was like a sea of people just surrounding me getting

(32:31):
ready to like ask me questions. Like it was crazy.
It definitely wore off and by the end, you know,
by the middle of the first year, nobody cared anymore.
But but did it make you feel popular or did
you feel like people thought you were like an outcast? No?
I felt like it was a complete liability. It's not
cool to be famous, let me tell you this, because, um,

(32:51):
especially in high school or in middle school, because you
you always think that other people think that you think
you're cool, right, you know, and so you're constantly like
downplaying all of it because you just want to blend in.
I don't think I'm cool. I do not think I'm
better than anybody, you know, and like I'll talk about
it if you're interested. But then the more you talk

(33:11):
more people like actually doesn't talk about herself and you
know what to answer your questions. So, like I mean,
Stacy Keenan and I talked about it all the time.
She was like, oh my god, it was a total liability.
I never wanted to talk about the show like with
like anyone in high school. Like I just wanted, you know,
I just wanted like everyone to like forget about that.
I did that for a living. And yeah, well she

(33:33):
also came off of my two dads too, so she
was like one of those those real kid actors or
that she was on TV most of her life by
that point, I have very similar right. Yeah, yeah, she
completely walked on and she's like she's a lawyer. She's
like she's a criminal prosecutor. Prosecutor, Yeah, can you imagine that,
Like I was just put in jail by the girl

(33:53):
from Step by Step, Like that would be that's what
would be weird to be like I'm almost like, can
you sign my my of Um? So, so yeah, you
and I have very similar stories with that because it's
like we were both from Like I grew up in
Connecticut and my parents weren't in the industry, and it
was kind of then like you'd come back to the
people you knew, and anytime you opened your mouth thinking

(34:15):
you were just having a conversation, it was then like,
oh you're now you're fully yourself, Like you asked me
the question like what do you know? Yeah, but they
didn't have to churn butter in Atlanta. You know again,
I am no longer taking the wrath for that hearing
that Ryder had to literally stoke the fires at his
his high school. So yes, can I ask you a question,
just very briefly going back, Um, because we've talked about

(34:38):
Danielle Ryder and I've talked about this and so many
young actors, I would say of them start in commercials.
Do you remember the first national commercial that you did? Oh? Yeah,
I did a commercial for six Flags white Water It
was the water park version at six Flags in Atlanta,
and we shot the commercial in like March. Oh my gosh, freezing,

(35:04):
freezing to get it done in time for the season,
so it wasn't open yet, right, So I'm in, like,
you know, the lazy River. And then like one point
they had us like going in the big waves and
we're like the waves and they're like the part of
the commercial they used as mean lazy river because you know,
I'm just like, like, you're having fun, kiding, I know

(35:26):
your shivering, just keep smiling. Almost so excited because they
gave me makeup, you know, because my list people blew.
I could not, so I mean I did six flags
and then I mean I did all kinds of weird ones.
Sweetie Pups that was another one. What is this sweet pop?

(35:47):
What is sweetie pup? They were like these little dogs.
They were like my little ponies, but they were puppies
and you can like do their hair and stuff like that.
I did manage commercials. I hated mayonnaise. That was a
real nightmare. That one A lot of banks. You know,
fun though, they were really fun. I enjoyed them because
the food was amazing and the catering was always listen

(36:09):
craft service on national commercials and on shows. It is
really it comes up so often on this podcast, and
I realized how much we sound completely food obsessed because
I know the catering was delicious. But Danielle, we've talked
about this, this is normal life. Because again, if my
wife and I what we talked about is what we're

(36:31):
gonna have for lunch, Ye, that's food is hugely But
also when you're on a set, when you're not working,
when you're not actively working, all you're doing is sitting around,
Like people don't realize how much sitting around. And granted,
when we were kids we were shuffled into school, but
when if we didn't have those three hours of four
hours of school, the only other place to gathers around

(36:54):
the food, Like it's around craft service. That's where you
just I mean your dressing room alone. That's where Tony
Quinn came on the show. We started picking up hobby,
so every day he and I would go to golf,
We play cards, we go bowling. It was like because
they would say, you know you'd by the time the
show starts to run, and Christine, you know this too.
I mean it's like your first second season. It's all
about the work. I mean, it's always all about the work,

(37:15):
but it's all about the schedule, and then by six
or seven season we were down to like four days
a week. We would have to come in at like noon,
we would be done by four. I mean it was
one of those things. So there's times where would be
like we have three hours off, let's go play golf.
I mean, it was just there's that's what you do
because you're moving along. I heard a story recently. Correct
me if this is wrong, but recently I was on

(37:37):
a set and I learned of a very famous actress
who wrote her lines in some kind of invisible not
invisible to her, but like in some kind of removable
pen in any like doorways, door frames, or if she
was at a desk on a post it note. She
had her lines written everywhere, so no matter where her

(37:58):
blocking was, she would just look and she could read
what her line was. I was like, that sounds crazy,
who would do that? And then I read somewhere that
you did the same thing. Is that true? No, So
the story is that's the thing that Patrick Dusty would do.

(38:19):
He would sometimes write things like around like you know
you can tell like watching the show now, because like
Stacy and I have been rewatching it. Um Stacy never
watched the show. She's never right, Okay, So she's watching
it for the first time and we're talking about it,
and I'm finding it really fascinating. Are you guys doing
a podcast? We are? Okay, Okay, we'll talk about that

(38:42):
in a second. Yes, But but he would he would
constantly do things like that. He also directed a lot
of the episodes, so you could quietly see him like
kind of nudging you to your mark or like taking
you out of her constantly. And Suzanne she could never
do that because she couldn't see the line like she had.

(39:02):
She had reading glasses, so she would be a little leasy.
But you can constantly see her checking her mark. She's
always break a mark. So no, I I never did that,
but we did joke about it on Hollywood Darlings that
it was like something that I would do, and it
was really just to take off of what Patrick Deffe
used to always do. Danielle, can you check the time?

(39:24):
Is it time for to talk about mash because oh
my gosh, let's see, are we sixty or seventy minutes
into Because every time Alan Alda apparently was operating and
he was looking down at the at the body, it
was actually just a piece of felt and his script
so he could read the lines as he was operating.
There's my match for the day. I get it absolutely,

(39:47):
especially when you're like the lead of the show. Like
Ben always had everybody's lines, but there was times where
he it's like he had six pages of dialogue to
himself and it was I can get writing that down somewhere,
or hey, my script is you know. Rusty would always
take do the notes, do everything in the script, and
then sit on it. Don't remember that he'd stand up
in there and under the couch, under the chair or whatever,

(40:08):
just because it was right there if he needed it.
So everybody's got their own little little We were constantly
hiding things under that couch. I think I don't remember
who it was. It might have been the Friends reunion.
But then like when they pulled they pulled an old
couch out to do like some kind of reunion and
they were still script pages. That's amazing. Everyone does it,
you know, And you ended up becoming very close with

(40:31):
Jody Sweeten, and you guys are still very close. We are, um,
who like what other friend circles, like celebrity friend circles?
Did you run in in the nineties. Who were your
closest friends. Oh my gosh, okay, so, um, I was
really close with Angela Watson when we were on the show.
The two of us were like thick as thieves. We

(40:52):
were like sisterly. Um, you know, I think from like oh,
I mean I was close with Jenna because we lived
in the same building and her family would come any
she had a younger sister. Um. I mean obviously I
would see you guys quite a lot. Writer we were,
we were we've been acting class. Yeah. Yeah, we did
Young Actor Space and Danielle you were there too too

(41:15):
for a little bit. Yeah that Bruce Bruce and then
Diane No, that was a different thing. It was Diane. Yeah,
Dane was the one who ran Young Actor Spoke. She
was amazing and um yeah that was like the best
acting class in Los Angeles for kids. It was so good, Yeah,
so good. And that really became like my I mean
that that was a social soul. Yeah. So Kelly Martin

(41:36):
was in that class, Tom David, Tom Price, Um, Luke Edwards, um,
who else? Um? And then just like a bunch of
like young like especially as we became young adults, like
a bunch of people who just graduated college and come
out and chadge Chad Gabriel like, yeah, so that was

(41:58):
kind of like my crew. Did you date any child actors? Well,
I don't even call it dating. I mean, obviously when
we're like fourteen, is it really dating? But you know
the teenage dating. Yeah. I did go on a couple
of dates with Andrew Keagan. Oh yes, I think everybody.
I think everybody did. The only one ask him why

(42:22):
he wasn't interested? I know. And then, um, I think
he was really the only one. I had definitely had
a crush on some of the home improvement boys and
why would like see them when I would like always
like flirt, but nothing really matriculated from that. Um. And
then I had a couple of like boyfriends in UM Atlanta.
But then and season I want to say five or

(42:45):
five maybe of the show we UM, we had a
new character come on. This is right before Jason. I think,
um he was flashed and he came on and he
was this like crazy guy who was like one of
Frank's I guess like um distance And anyway, he was
played by a guy named Jeff Juday and Jeff Jeff
and Jason were really good friends. Yeah. Yeah, so Jeff

(43:08):
came on the show. Um, I thought he was super cute.
I mean I was like seventeen at the time and
I don't know, early twenties. And then we went on
a we did a Disney trip. I'm sure you guys
did too. Didjeverfilm in Disney Disney World? Yes, so we're
filming at Disney World. Stacy Keenan was actually in the
episode where we went to Disney World. Not let's not
even get into that, please please people. I was not invited,

(43:32):
was not there, But I hadn't the biggest crush on
Stacy keene in my entire life, growing up to the
point where I said to to our producers, I would
love to get Stacy Keene on the show. They do,
and then they fly everybody to Disney World and they're
and you're staying home like, hey, thanks, awful. It was
awful because the worst Okay, so go on, don't don't

(43:54):
let will bring us down. So so, um so we
go to Disney World and it's just you know, you're
having sorry, well you're having the time like a host
and rides and like there's no school. You're like, do
it later. I gotta ride, you know, Tower Terror sounds awesome,
you know, and Jeff and I would like start going
on rides, and then like one night me him, um

(44:14):
Angela Watson, like her boyfriend at the time, we all
go to the Downtown Disney for like dancing and we're
like at mannequins were like the rotating dance and he
and I like kiss, like oh my god, you know,
and I had just like the biggest crush on him.
So then we have to leave Disney World and that
was our last episode and I have to go back

(44:36):
to Atlanta and he's going to l A and I'm
like crying. I'm crying in the transport van and I've
had the time when my life is playing from Dirty
Dancing and I'm like, I'm never going to and I
am heartbroken. We end up dating for four years when
first boyfriend like my first boyfriend, and he had been

(45:00):
you know, for all sorts of reasons. They had to
bring Bronzon Pin Show on and blah blah blah. He
is his character didn't continue and I did and uh,
and he was like really into theater. He took me
to the Amondson and the Taper and I mean, he
was just he you know, he was really nice, Like
he was just a nice guy. And every thing I
remember the most about him. And he was not a

(45:20):
big drinker, so I don't want to in any way,
shape or form, but any restaurant you go to up
to and including Burger King a McDonald's, he'd tried to
order a beer. What and so it would be like
you'd be as liked he bed like a diner and
he'd be like, yeah, can I Can I get a beer?
And they'd be like, no, no, we don't have that here.
It's like, okay, no, But it was just everywhere we
went like can I get a whopper? And if you

(45:41):
have a beer, like, Nope, that's not they don't they
don't have that here. But I just remember him being
like the nicest person in the world. He was just
a sweet guy. He was a really sweet guy. He
actually was just out here. He has two children and
so we still keep in touch and that's cool. Out here.
We all went to dinner. Yeah, we don't think he
ordered a beery sluten free now, so oh that's good.
That's good. That's good. We recently had Marla sockle Off

(46:03):
on and we talked a little bit about it, how UM,
a lot of us went through just some very serious
actor burnout. And so considering you also did seven seasons
of Step by Step the way we did seven seasons
of boy Me's World, did you ever experience like just
total burnout, like I don't want to do this anymore,
get me away from here, get me back to Atlanta,
or did you just did you never experience that? You know,

(46:27):
I don't feel like on the show necessarily I ever
experienced that. I I had such a specific relationship with
um acting because it was the thing for me that
was like my fun. It was my outlet, and my
parents were always like, well that's great, but you you
we always we also expect you to get really good grades,

(46:47):
and like that comes first. So for me, it was
more like I experienced burnout with I think the the schedule,
the workload of school coupled with the stuff that I
really wanted to do, and that was at times, especially
like preparing for college and doing college applications. I just
had a lot on my plate and I feel like

(47:08):
there were times at which I felt, yeah, like I
couldn't do it at all. Um, I didn't really experience
actor burnout necessarily until I was a little older. And
it's just like the constant auditioning. I mean, honestly, it's
one of the reasons why I started directing, because I
was just like, I don't think I can keep doing
this the rest of my life. I don't. I've been
doing this since I was a child, and I just

(47:29):
I love to work, but the constant auditioning, I need
a break. It doesn't I don't enjoy that part of
it personally. How did you get into directing? Um? So gosh.
About ten years ago, I, you know, I had started
to experience that very thing that I was just discussing,

(47:49):
and I thought, you know, I gotta start doing my
own stuff. That's where I think I'm happiest. So I
started writing. I took a couple of classes, I started,
you know, I had some ideas. I made a I
made a really silly mockumentary digital series called Love and
Laken um and my friend at the time had a
documentary film company, so we had all this equipment and

(48:10):
he's like, let's just do something silly, and I was like, okay.
So I wrote this stupid series and I was doing
a film called um you again, so all these you
know people were I was around all these people. So
like Kristen Bell did an episode, and Kristin Chenow with
in an episode. I Curtis to do an episode Bornheimer. Anyway,
it's basically about this girl named Christine Laken who used

(48:31):
to be a child actor and thinks everybody knows here.
It's like a comeback office. And we had such a
good time filming. It was just silly. I put in
a bunch of film festivals. We want some stuff. It
got bought by Hulu. Um. So that was really like
the first time that I did something that was mine
and I was like, I had more fun doing that
and not making any money from it. It wasn't about

(48:52):
that than anything else. And so that kind of got
the wheels turning. Um. And then at the same time,
I I have this other life as a choreographer. I know,
I've so I know it's tell us a little bit
about that because I didn't even know that was going on.
And then I saw you posting about it on Instagram
and I was like, holy how she has like a

(49:12):
full blown other side hustle. I do so I I
you know, like I said when I moved to Atlanta.
I had been in dance, so I was like a
competition dancer before step by step happened. And then all
of that kind of went away, and I sort of
started to go back to classes and I was trained,
but I was never going to be like, so you
think you can dance, like I wasn't that good. But
I do have a background of dance. So when I

(49:33):
went in my twenties, when the show ended and I
was going back to theater and I was in acting
class and I found a theater company and I found
a home, and really, for me, it was about like
remembering why I love to do this, and I had
to keep that going so that I didn't spiral out
of like trying to get the next job and like
trying to be who I once was, and like all
of that I think can lead you down to really,

(49:55):
for me, anyway, a very strange rabbit hole. So I
got into the theater company, and a lot of times
in the or in l A, people are like, well,
we need someone to choreograph this number is can anyone
dance captain? That was kind of me, so I started
doing it just for my theater company. Then my name
got passed around. I did it for a few more
you know productions, and I got nominated a couple of times.
And then I went to do a movie called Reach

(50:15):
for Madness and in UM, Canada, and I was there
just like hanging out waiting for my scenes, and the
choreographer said, would you come skeleton crew for me? And
I said sure. So I helped her build some dances
and then she hired me to be an assistant on
a film. And from that, literally a d s just
started to My name would get passed around and they

(50:36):
would just start to call me. And the thing that
I realized I was really good at was communicating um,
the language of dance to people who are non dancers.
So I was really good at Yeah, not only meeting
with an actor who looked at me with fear in
their eyes and said, I'm not a dancer. Well I

(50:56):
don't you know, And I'm like, yeah, no, we're just
kind of like play. It's like right, Yeah, I would
disarm them completely, yeah, and then I would see very
quickly what they were good at and what they like.
Some people you think have rhythm don't um. So I
would really break it down, yeah, and I would like
make it very simple find out what they were good at,
keep it clean, hire people around them to make them

(51:19):
look this way and that way. You know, I would
kind of like talk to the director of the producer,
you know, we would film it, I would change it
concerning what they would want whatever. So for ten years
maybe more now, I've been doing that on all kinds
of shows I've worked on, UM, West World, I worked
on True Blood and then I uh, and then I
got season one. UM. I started doing it for the Goldbergs,

(51:42):
and around season five, I think I was sitting there
and waiting and I'm watching all these directors that you're
waiting forever, as you know, for your scene, you've already
rehearsed with the cast, and so you're waiting and waiting.
And I just thought to myself, I'm an idiot. That's
the job I should be doing. I'm watching all these
directors and I'm like, why have I not been doing that?

(52:03):
So that really started me on this new trajectory of
trying to figure out my way in. And it's as
you know, as he was probably no writer, it's it's
not linear. You know. I didn't go to film school, UM,
but I had all this information. I knew the job,
so I just had to give myself more practice so
that people and more to show for myself that so

(52:23):
that people would take a chance on me. So I
started directing everything I could get my hands on, funnier die,
shorts of friends, short of pilot, presentation, a music video,
like anything I could do, I did, and I gotten
a couple of women's advocacy groups, and I was still choreographing,
And I really think it was the combination of me
being a choreographer and then having and having been in

(52:45):
the business a long time. It took many years, but
of of advocating, and then I was I was trying
to get on the Goldbergs because that was sort of
like what I thought my easiest way. And I was shadowing.
I was on your show shadowing. I was shadowing and
show away and I I hope someone's gonna give me a job.
And I was choreographing a number on the Goldbergs. I

(53:06):
was pregnant at the time and newly pregnant with my
son and um. I remember talking to Wendy McClendon. We
were doing some kind of flashdance thing, and you know,
we're talking about female directors and how they would just
like to have more of them. Um, but there were
so few and they were always working, and I was like,
and we just had a really nice chat about it.
And I think a lot of the actors at that

(53:28):
point on that show trusted me with me and it
took a long time, but they I think a lot
of people put in a good word. And you know
how these things happen, it's kids, mean and timing, and
so I literally had I ended up sending Adam Goldberg
a bunch of my stuff, but I was like, probably
not gonna here, Like you know, I was really kind
of at the end of my rope of like I

(53:48):
don't know how I'm going to get into this, and um,
I had literally just had my son. This is four
years ago. I just had my son, and the day
after I gave birth, my agent called it said, I
know this isn't very timing, but they'd like to give
you an episode of The Goldberg's and it shoots in
seven weeks. And I was like, awesome, sign me up.

(54:10):
And I looked at my husband. I was like, I
don't know, what do you think. He's like, Well, how
first of all, how you feel you can you can
reserve your right to say no, you know, even a
couple of weeks if you don't feel well. I was.
I had a really easy berth by second and I
was like, he's like, but I think if you should
do it, He's like, I will make sure this child lives.
You should do this, And so I was like pumping

(54:33):
and going to work and yeah, so that was my
first one. And then luckily, very thankfully, they liked what
I did and they've had me back a bunch and
done some other stuff too, and so good for you.
She's hysterical that Wendy. Wendy is the best. Oh man.
I was such a fan of her, especially on Renee
and then Sean uh Is Sean Jane Brownie is to

(54:55):
me is a living cartoon character. And I say that
in the mo phenomenal possible way you can imagine. He's
the sweetest little lamb. He's not changed at all. He's
talked to him last week. He's he's incredible, such a
such a fun guy. But it's like he's so happy
to be there, you know, he's just still. Yeah. I
have an amazing picture I will give to the Pond

(55:17):
Meats World Show Instagram of Christine and I at one
of those bowling events that we went to, and Andrew
Keegan was there, and Ksey Keegan was there, and I
am wearing a Batman Returns T shirt. Of course you are,
of course sounds and it's a great picture of Christine
and I and um. I have so so many of

(55:38):
my little T G I F nineties memories involve you,
Christine and and even though we can't remember exactly how
we met, you are just an indelible part of my
my teenage hood. And well say for all of you,
I have like very specific when with whether it's like
you sleeping over at our apartment, I think you can
over for sleepover once or like will like I think

(56:00):
I helped you move, or I helped you did help
someone you helped me move. It was it was Marsden
and somebody and we and you all just showed up
to help me move from one apartment to another in
the same building. It was like having to move one
floor up. Yea, like filming you know, Buck Naked Arson,
that was like one of the best experiences ever had

(56:20):
asn't actor. It really sticks out there is like one
of my was that at redwood Shire. Yeah, we shot
a movie right after Boy Mee's World ended. The summer
after we shot a movie at my parents property. It
was one of the first high def digital films ever.
Like we got that, we got the cameras that George
Lucas said like not taken for Phantom Menace. We got
the other cameras, but they were like it was like

(56:41):
the new latest technology. We shot a feature in twelve days,
which back then was just unheard of to make something
that quick. Now it's kind of standard. But back then
we shot all my parents property. But we just had
so much fun. We're just like camping out and like
staying up until sunrise because we're shooting nights. So much fun.
And then you brought me on Hollywood Arlings, which is
just fun, which is just a ton of fun. Yeah,

(57:04):
that was a really fun job, I have to say,
you know, like getting to do something like that with
people you love and bringing all you know friends in
and like just the improv nature of that show. I
don't know why more things aren't like that. Um, I
was just because more people won't allow it, because because
the networks and stuff don't allow it. That's that's the
answer to that. Unfortunately, and I mean even as a

(57:26):
rehearsal process, even as a director, I think about, you know,
having people talk about their characters or talk in character
about who they are. I mean, it's such a valuable
tool to have and I wish that there was, you know,
more rehearsal time to do stuff like that, or even
just improv scenes between characters, because I think it's I mean,
it was just really the best. Christine, tell everyone where

(57:47):
we can find you and where we can see you,
and tell us about your podcast with Stacy. Yes, um,
you can find me on Instagram at yolacon Yo Lincoln
Um and our podcast he's called We have an Instagram
it's called Keenan and Laken Give you Deja Vu. I
love it, And that will be coming out shortly. We
have like a few more episodes to film in season one.

(58:09):
You know, she's a lawyer, you guys, she could get
exactly a criminal case and she's like, I'm sorry, I
got to put these people away and I'm like real
work to do. Yeah, so so very soon probably sometimes
fall incredible. Well, thank you so much for being here
with us. Always fun to catch up with you. And um,
you're you're a mom inspiration. We didn't even get to

(58:31):
talk about the fact that you have two beautiful children
in a fantastic husband, but you're always like such an
inspiration for me, both both work wise and personally. Um,
I just said, I look at you in so many ways.
Thank you for being with us. So good to see
you guys. Bye bye. I don't like her the worst.

(58:58):
She is just terrible, isn't she. Yeah, she's just you
know what. One of the things I just love about
her so much is never once do I have a
single memory of her where she's ever been anything other
than just totally her. She is one of the most authentic,
genuine people. There's no airs about her. She's just who like.

(59:21):
Who you see is who you get. She's always smiling,
always smiling, and helpful. When I was pregnant with Adler
and I knew absolutely nothing about what was about to
happen to me, I knew, I knew, you know, your
first time mom, you don't know anything. She was one
of the only people to pull me aside and say, listen,

(59:42):
here's gonna be some things you're gonna need to do,
and here's gonna be how you're gonna feel, and here's
what's what's going to happen? And and I don't want
you to feel blindsided by it. And she just gave
me and she put me in touch with people who
were able to like I mean, she was phenomenal and
um yeah, I mean I've talked to her about directing
stuff like I I and I remember because she was
saying she she was shadowing on Girl Meets World. Yeah,

(01:00:06):
I knew when she was trying to get into directing,
and I remember, you know, watching her do it and
now to see the amazing career she's had, um and
we'll continue to have, is is just wonderful. But I
also has to be said, a wonderful actor. I never
watched that, I said. I realized as we were going
into this was like I don't think I've seen a
single episode, which is you know, maybe not that crazy,

(01:00:29):
but I don't know what that show. I mean, I
have like an image of like it was a family show,
you know what I knew, But it was really working
with her an acting class and then working with her
on Buck Naked Arson. I just she is such a
good actor. And I always always thought like just like
always brought professional attitude, like you said, super positive but genuine,

(01:00:49):
but then also just talented, like she could make a
scene come alive. Such a good actor. She's incredible. So
I'm so glad that she joined us for that. And
our next episode will be that we are are recapping
season one, episode fourteen, the b Team of Life. It
aired originally January, so we will see you all later
in the week with that. Um, you can follow us

(01:01:12):
on Instagram pod Meets World Show and you can also
buy our March March pod Meets World Show dot com.
And um, we get your emails this uh this last week.
I'm not gonna say what yet, but boy did we
get a lot of emails. It out one particular subject

(01:01:33):
and void did we here? Um, so I would like
to say email us, but unless you're gonnote if if
you write, write about anything other than the Lama pen.
We know about the Lama pen. Okay, we got it.
I don't know what that is. If somebody could send
in some emails about that, I'd appreciate Pod Meets World

(01:01:56):
Show at gmail dot com. If you insist on writing
more about the Lama pen, we will have to close
the email down. Thank you guys for being with us. Well,
I think It's you. We Love you All. Pod dismissed.
Pod Meets Worlds an I heart podcast produced and hosted
by Danielle Fischel, Wilfred l and Wryter Strong Executive producers,
Jensen Cart and Amy Sugarman, Executive in charge of production,

(01:02:19):
Danielle Romo, producer and editor, Tara sud Batch, producer, Jackie Rodriguez,
engineer and Boy Meets World super fan Easton Allen. Our
theme song is by Kyle Morton of Typhoon. You can
follow us on Instagram at Pod meets World Show or
email us at pod Meets World Show at gmail dot
com
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