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May 27, 2024 35 mins
The best of the Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show Hour 1.

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Speaker 1 (00:00):
Thank you for listening.

Speaker 2 (00:01):
This is the best of with Klay Travis and Buck Sexton.

Speaker 3 (00:05):
Buck, I wanted to talk about this because we mentioned
it yesterday. The Senate has passed a ninety five point
three billion dollar payment your tax dollars going to fund
the border and protect the border of Ukraine, Taiwan, and Israel.
Twenty two, I believe, is the number Republican senators supported

(00:31):
this bill. It's now moving on to the House. Yesterday
I was reading and I just want to ask you.
I want all of you to think about this as
a broad idea. We are now thirty five trillion roughly
in debt.

Speaker 1 (00:48):
When the Tea Party started.

Speaker 3 (00:51):
And became an issue, we were at ten trillion dollars
in debt. So we're averaging adding about a trillion dollars
a year to our national debt. I saw a report
from the Congressional Budget Office I was reading about it yesterday, Buck,
that we are on pace to have a fifty four

(01:15):
trillion dollar federal deficit a decade from now. And my
son is sixteen years old. He's a sophomore in high
school and he's just starting to study economics. And we
were having this conversation recently, the dollar is the default

(01:36):
currency for the world. What happens if suddenly our foreign
adversaries who own trillions of dollars in American debt, what
happens buck if one day they just decide they're not
going to buy the debt that we are constantly issuing

(01:58):
out there.

Speaker 4 (01:59):
What you're talking about, that is the death of the dollars,
the global reserve currency, and the end of American dominance
in all respects, including our quality of life that we
have gotten very used to in this country where we
can be these massive consumers and get deeply indebted and

(02:20):
it doesn't really affect things for us. I mean, part
of the problem is, yes, we complain the economy is
not as good now as it should be, But you've
spent some time in countries I'm sure where you see
what real economic deformation looks like or real economic reversal
looks like, and it is a shocking thing. It is

(02:41):
a devastating thing to that nation. And I think that unfortunately,
right now, we don't have a system that will allow
this to turn around. We don't have people who are
willing to make decisions today that take the future into account.
This is a function of math isn't an interesting There
are so many people who are much more concerned about climate,

(03:04):
it seems, than about the debt these days. One of
them is a real thing that is not a real problem,
meaning climate is changing, it has always changing, Yes, of
course it changes. There's no real threat to humanity into
us whatsoever. The other thing is a mathematical certainty that
the debt burden will become so heavy that it will
crowd out other spending and it will change the lives

(03:28):
of the American people in future generations in ways that
we would really hate to see, and that can of
course lead to social unrest, civil unrest, all kinds of
other problems as well. But I can sit here and
talk about it, and we could talk about where the
debt was and the Tea Party era in twenty ten
versus where it is now. I think it was what
was it, ten trillion?

Speaker 1 (03:49):
We've had five trillion in debt since the Tea Party.

Speaker 4 (03:53):
So, you know, we talk about this, and look, you
know one way that one way that Trump hit Ron
desantists right away and it was effective was Ron wanted
to cut entitlements. Even among Republicans. This is some real
talk even among Republicans you want to win, say you
won't touch entitlement spending, you say you won't touch the
retirement age. As long as that continues, we're just gonna

(04:14):
get I mean, that's for me. I don't want to
be overly fatalistic about it, but maybe maybe that's what
I'm being. Until people feel pain, they won't change. And
the problem with this is once you start to feel
the pain, then the change.

Speaker 1 (04:25):
Is too late, too late. It's all too late.

Speaker 4 (04:27):
And this is where we are. You know, think about that.
Ivan Trump has said, I won't touch your your social security,
I won't touch your Medicare, I won't touch you know,
entitlement spending, I won't touch a retirement age. And that's
a Republican from outside the establishment. And anyone who would
run against him in this primary, or you know, anyone
who going forward is running as a Republican, they know

(04:47):
they'll lose if they say they want to touch any
of those things. And you bring that up down. People
always say, Clay, I've paid into this my whole life.
Medic social security is fixable, and that's doable. You just
make some change, You do a little bit of means
testing for rich people, and you raise the retirement age
a couple of years. You figure out when you do that,
you get out the actuarial table. It's not the end
of the world. Medicare is a big problem because people say, oh,

(05:10):
I've been paying into it. The average person, the average
person takes out twice in medicare, spending what they pay
and do over the course of their lifetime, and a
vast majority of that spending comes in the last six
months of life. Yeah, so we have to fix these
things somehow. But you know, you say you want to
fix it, you're a bad person. You say you want
to change it. You know, you and I are getting older.

(05:32):
You know at some point we're gonna want medicare too.
I want it to be there, and I want it
to be a functioning program for people. But I don't know. Man,
we sit here, we talk about it. Look at this
foreign spending we're doing.

Speaker 1 (05:44):
Why are we giving?

Speaker 3 (05:44):
That's why it ties in.

Speaker 1 (05:47):
Give me any of these countries.

Speaker 4 (05:48):
And notice, is there anyone who has been more vocally
in support of Israel, well, period, but also since October
seventh than we have been on this show.

Speaker 1 (05:58):
I don't think yesterday.

Speaker 4 (05:59):
I tell there's a look what do you mean you're talking?
Israel's a wealthy country. Why are we giving Israel sixteen
billion dollars? Why do we give it three billion dollars
every year? And it's not just Israel? Why are we
giving sixty billion dollars to Ukraine? Why do we have
the foreign aid budget that we have in total? What
are we are you getting for this?

Speaker 1 (06:17):
I agree completely, and I think it.

Speaker 3 (06:20):
Look if you want to give to charity, because let's
be honest, that's basically what we're doing here, then most
of you, if you run ran your household, you wouldn't
go in debt to donate to charity. In fact, your
husband or wife, if you sat down at the table

(06:40):
and you said, hey, for part of our budget this year,
I want to give five thousand dollars in charity on
the credit card, every single one of you out there
would look at your spouse like they were absolutely insane
if you wouldn't do in your household what the United

(07:01):
States government is doing for our entire household and buck.
I don't see this as democrat. I don't see this
as republican. I don't see this as independent. To me,
anyone voting to give one hundred billion dollars, rounding up
from ninety five or ninety six billion to foreign countries
when we are thirty five trillion dollars in debt. I

(07:25):
think your analogy with global warming is a really good one.
One of the biggest issues in life, this is me
giving you a little bit of a ted talk, is
most people fear things which in reality are not threats
to them, and you spend a lot of time being
fearful of things that are never going to be an

(07:47):
issue in your life. You and I are in our forties.
I've got three kids, sixteen, thirteen, and nine. I'm building
a beach house. I've said before I ain't worried about
the rising oceans. All right, maybe it's going to be
an issue for my beach house. If so I was wrong,
I'll deal with it. I am insanely worried about the

(08:07):
fact that at some point in my kids' lives, maybe
even some point in my life, we're going to be
one hundred trillion dollars in debt. And if you don't
think that our adversaries out there are not planning on
bankrupting this country, everybody wants to talk about, oh, there's

(08:28):
a new threat from Russia.

Speaker 1 (08:29):
Oh, there's a new threat from China today.

Speaker 3 (08:32):
The big looming asteroid that is aimed right for America
that is in danger of obliterating this country is We're
going to have fifty five trillion dollars in debt a
decade from now, and then just the interest on our
national debt is going to become soon the biggest single

(08:56):
expenditure that this country has.

Speaker 4 (08:59):
There's a long history, there's a long history of this
of fiat currency. You can go back and even look
at the usage of paper currency in you know, China,
over a thousand years ago. I mean, there's when once
they start printing it in paper, and once the money
has no intrinsic value is not backed by anything, what happens.

(09:22):
Inflation happens, and inflation we all know what that does,
particularly to those who don't hold assets. And then that
the political this is the problem we're in right now,
the political mechanism to check it, even in a republic
like ours, right even in a system where the people
who are suffering from the inflation, who are suffering from

(09:43):
these decisions are the ones who are supposed to be
able to make it right, no one can win and
get the power they need to solve the problem. Because
the person who says, keep eating those treats, they won't
make you fat, keep eating a whole chocolate cake every night,
there's no problem with it. That person wins because they're
appealing to the immediate and they're appealing to the sense

(10:06):
that I get mine. I'm not worried about what comes
down the line. That is what it is. Bipartisan in
this country. It is the truth. And you're not even
really here. You know, we're hopefully going to elect a
president who's obviously far better than Joe Biden. Donald Trump's
not going to touch the debt anyone, to anyone, take
bets on that one. Not gonna touch the debt. He's
going to spend a lot. Just Donald Trump spend six

(10:28):
trillion dollars last year in office. Everybody, I know it
was COVID.

Speaker 3 (10:31):
I know.

Speaker 4 (10:31):
Oh, we can't. We can't blame Trump for anything. Look,
I love the guy. I'm hoping he's gonna be president.
But if we're talking about the debt, you know, this
is the situation, folks. I don't know, man, I just
we are a bummer on Valentine.

Speaker 3 (10:46):
I just I think it ties in so much with
the failure that we have from our elected officials. We
are thirty five trillion dollars in debt, and they are
telling us it's anti American if we won't take out
one hundred billion dollars in additional debt and send it
to foreign countries to protect their own border while our border.

Speaker 1 (11:10):
Is wide open.

Speaker 3 (11:12):
And this to a large extent, and the Senate is bipartisan,
and I just look at it and I say, no
one would run their family finances like the United States
government does. And just think about it. If you donate
to charity is a fabulous thing to do. If you
were donating five thousand dollars to charity on your credit

(11:33):
card that you didn't have, and you were going to
have to pay interest on that donation, none of you
would do it. And if you had a spouse that
suggested it, you would tell them that they're crazy.

Speaker 1 (11:45):
Well, certainly your on American.

Speaker 4 (11:48):
Your analogy is is actually people are saying, hey, let's
do something really nice for some other family. Let's do
something really nice for some other family, because it's going
on someone else's credit card. And that's what people don't realize.
It's actually our credit card. It's the credit, the faith
and credit of the American people, and we're all in

(12:11):
it together on the dollar. It's not even a partisan thing.
I don't want the dollar to collapse for any of us,
because then it collapses for all of us.

Speaker 3 (12:19):
And also to then argue that if I'm opposed to that,
I'm not an American, that it's an American to be
opposed to spending one hundred billion dollars on somebody else's border.
If we had a budget surplus, that's a conversation we
could have.

Speaker 1 (12:36):
We don't have a budget surplus.

Speaker 3 (12:38):
In fact, I'm concerned that all of this is going
to blow up one day. We're going to try to
sell debt and there ain't gonna be a buyer, and
what happens, then lookout, I mean look out in a
big way.

Speaker 2 (12:51):
You're listening to the best of Clay Travis and Buck Sexton.

Speaker 4 (12:57):
Welcome back into Clay and Buck. We're going to be
closing up shop here and I wanted to tell you,
remind you if I could, that it is a great time.
So first of all, subscribe to Crocket Coffee. Go to
crocket Coffee dot com. Please subscribe, get your coffee from
us because we love you, We love America, we love patriotism,
we love American history. Don't get it from some communists,
some nameless, faceless brand that's trying to fund DEI and

(13:21):
all kinds of woke initiatives. Plus, our coffee taste better
than yours. You say, wait, is that really true? Try it?
You'll see for yourself. Crocketcoffee dot com. Sign up, go
check it out, and you will be very pleased that
you did. Also, the Clay and Buck podcast feed is phenomenal.
We got the Tutor Dixon Show, Carol Markowitz Show, Sean

(13:41):
Parnell's Show, Lisa Booth Show. I mean, we got shows
on shows and they are all fantastic. These are all
hand pick talents from the world of conservative commentary and
they do a great job. So you get our podcast,
of course, which we hope you all listen to on demand,
down with the iHeartRadio app to do so, and we
will be good to go from there. Let me see

(14:04):
what else do I have here for you? Clay, I
was in New York City of the weekend visiting family.

Speaker 1 (14:10):
Do you miss it?

Speaker 3 (14:12):
As a wifelong New Yorker who now lives in Miami,
there's a lot of people who've made that move.

Speaker 1 (14:15):
Do you miss living in New York City?

Speaker 4 (14:17):
I still have so much nostalgia for the place. I
go around, and it feels more comfortable for me than
any other place in the world still because I know
it better. It doesn't. It's interesting. The longer I'm away
from it, the more it feels like a lot of
the complaints about the dirtiness of the streets and situation

(14:39):
on the subway, that's all true. In fact, Ginger also
known as Ginger Spice, that's what's on her driver's license.
She was with us, which was great because you got
to spend time with my little almost four year old
nephew and they had a lot of fun. He loves
fluffy Ginger. Who doesn't. But she was kind of a
head turner, more so than usual because the city streets

(15:01):
were so dirty. And then also we're a little wet
from the rain that we got her little booties. And
let me tell you, you put little little rubber boots
on your dog and all of a sudden, everybody's just like,
oh my gosh, are those little rubber boots on your dog?
The answer is yes, that's right. We want to keep
her little paws nice and dry, so we people stopping
even more so than usual. I want to hang out

(15:21):
with her. But it was also an indication I think,
unfortunately the city streets are not in good shape. It's
not a city that is on the rise the way
it was i'd say fifteen years ago, when things were
just humming in New York City it was doing so well.

Speaker 3 (15:37):
Did you see, speaking of things that used to be
doing well, this story, I just can't believe it's real.
I don't even know if you saw it. Did you
see the Oregon trans runner, this dude who won the
Oregon women's high school state title and they booed him

(15:58):
as he crossed the finish line. But for all these
people out there who keep saying, we're gonna have Riley
Gaines on the show tomorrow and we'll have this conversation
with her, for sure.

Speaker 1 (16:07):
But for all these.

Speaker 3 (16:08):
People out there, you speak about just things that you
wouldn't have believed were possible. People say, oh, I don't
know why you care about this.

Speaker 4 (16:17):
Yeah.

Speaker 3 (16:17):
For the number of times that they say, I don't
know why you care about this. And then there's a
state champion who's a dude who's just beating girls like
this is crazy. And the fact that there were people booing,
yet they're voting for politicians that make this real is
got to be sort of a incongruous. And the same
way with New York City, where when you look around
and you see how bad it's become, San Francisco, Portland, Seattle,

(16:40):
you have to blame yourself because people are voting for
these policies to be put in place. But I just
keep wondering when the reality is finally going to take
and you're gonna get a Juliani in all these different
cities type who just comes in and says, you knuckleheads,
let me fix what should be an amazing place. Just
by we're seeing true justice and a little bit of sanity.

Speaker 4 (17:03):
I worry that some places are are too ideologically ossified
and are to maybe have too many dumb people to
be honest, low information voters, and also just start to
think that these places have to be like this. And
I think I don't know if I mentioned the show.
My little brother went to Japan recently just for fun

(17:25):
with his wife. They just have never been. I've always
wanted to go. I don't go, No, no, I love it.
We might have to do Clay and Buck live from
Tokyo at some point all of a sudden, our engineers
would be good. Yes, but no, I think that would
be a lot of fun. What I have no idea
what time it would even be over There would be
very different timetable. But to be in a country, this

(17:45):
is one thing I can take from everyone I know
who's been there, and I think it matters for Americans
and it's important that we hear this. A country of
over one hundred million people where there is effectively no
violent crime, no trash in the streets, no disorder, and
no dysfunction, that it is possible, in fact, you can

(18:07):
be And this is not some little you know. It's
one thing to say, oh, there's an island to the
South Pacific where there's no Yeah, well, you know, if
three hundred people live there and they all know each
other and there's no one else coming or coming or
going really except for wealthy tourists, that doesn't really count.
Japan is as a country with over one hundred million
people where you can basically I don't know, I mean
it's probably it's definitely under one hundred murders a year.

(18:29):
In the whole country. I mean the number of murders
is absolutely infinitesimal. Then the crime is so low. And
I bring it up not because oh why can't we
be like Japan, No, we're very different. I understand that
we don't have to accept these things that we accept
in American cities.

Speaker 2 (18:43):
Now you're listening to the best of Clay Travis and
Buck Sexton.

Speaker 3 (18:49):
Welcome back in Clay Travis Buck Sexton show. I got
an angry email for you, Buck. So gay Travis. He
has cleverly changed my name from Clay to gay. Literally
this is the email. So gay Travis and and Couck
Sexton he has changed from Buck to cock. That's not

(19:11):
as soon as I saw it. I'll be honest with you.
I get a lot of very positive emails from you guys,
but the negative ones really do make me laugh more.

Speaker 4 (19:21):
So, I swear I knew that was coming. I knew
that was like, I knew that was next up. Go ahead.

Speaker 3 (19:26):
So gay Travis and Cuck Sexton are against recreational cannabis
because then people will be smoking in places they aren't
supposed to. You mean, like I don't know, all caps
alcohol the most dangerous drug in the United States every year,
and then he ends with it's.

Speaker 1 (19:44):
All about alcohol.

Speaker 3 (19:46):
If alcohol is legal, no reason all drugs shouldn't be. Now,
go be a hypocrite and sip a glass of whiskey
like I know you will. You guys are a fn joke. Okay,
on behalf of Gay Travis and Cuck Sexton. What I
would suggest here is, to my knowledge, Buck, no one

(20:08):
ever like the legalization of all drugs. Is I think
a crazy arguments. No one has ever had a beer
a beer and died. Nope, I don't believe it's ever happened.
No one has ever had a glass of whiskey to
my knowledge and died. Now do people often abuse alcohol, Yes,

(20:29):
but you have to abuse alcohol for a long time
and drink a lot of it. And we have a
lot of laws that would keep people from being able
to abuse alcohol. And when you violate the law, you
deal with the consequences. There's a big difference between fentanyl
and buffalo trace.

Speaker 4 (20:47):
Just talking and I'll tell you you know why. First
of I would just say to all the people that
would be considering you know that they'd be writing in
right now. Hopefully they will work up the enthusiasm and
the motive to write a full email to us who
are in favor of the lead weed legalization. I used
to hold their their view. I mean I really for

(21:08):
many years, and so I want to be very clear
about this. I was pro. I was never pro legalized everything,
because that's insane, because I knew from the scientific side
of things that fentanyl is just it's just far more dangerous.
It's you know, it's far more addictive, far more dangerous,
so you can.

Speaker 1 (21:24):
Die the first time you use it. If you can
die the first time you use something, in my opinion,
it shouldn't be illegal.

Speaker 4 (21:29):
I mean to say that fentanyl is like weed, it
would be like saying, you know, a daisy rider BB
gun is the same as a fifty caliber machine gun,
Like what's the difference. There's enormous difference, Okay, enormous difference
between them. But I used to hold this position, and
I think unfortunately we've we've run the experiment now and
the pro weed side of things greatly overstated the benefits

(21:54):
and greatly understated the downside. And that is what I
experienced as somebody who was pro marijuana legal pro sorry,
marijuana legalization sounds like I've been smoking marijuana. Legalization for
the last decade or so. It has had it's hurt
in New York City, it has hurt the state of Oregon,
every place where they have done this. It brings degenerates

(22:14):
into communities, It brings degenerate businesses that bring all these
people into residential areas. It increases crime. It is a
bad thing, and you could say, oh, well, you know
what was going on before. What was going on before
was you basically weren't going to get arrested for smoking marijuana.
But if you were doing it somewhere out in the open,

(22:35):
you could get arrested for smoking marijuana. So at least
there were some All my friends were in New York
City growing up, by the way, pretty much got arrested
for smoking weed. None of them had records. It wasn't
a big deal, but you had to, you know, avoid
the cops in public. Drinking a glass of wine does
not affect anyone around you. Also, I would say your
conduct can affect people if you get too drunk. Smoking

(22:55):
weed is a disgusting and filthy habit. Unfortunately, it filter's
out in the air. Other people have to smell it.
Kids smell it. It's gross. I am I know I'm
upsetting some people this. I am adamantly opposed to marijuana.

Speaker 3 (23:09):
I'm not as strong as you are, but I do
think it's funny that we shut down basically all cigarettes
smoking because we're like, we can't have anybody smoke cigarettes.
We can't allow people even to smoke cigarettes outside of
buildings in particular places. You almost never see My kids
react to somebody smoking cigarettes like like somebody might as

(23:30):
well shoot it up heroin. They're like, oh my god, Dad,
did you see that person smoking a cigarettes? It's relatively
rare now, and we simultaneously have put it in a
situation where people smoke weed.

Speaker 1 (23:41):
All the time everywhere.

Speaker 3 (23:44):
And the other thing I would add is we did
prohibit alcohol and it didn't go very well at all
in this country. And we balance in all facets of life.
This is what we used to do pre COVID. We
balance equities. I'm teaching my sixteen year old how to dry.
We could make the speed limit in the United States
fifteen miles.

Speaker 1 (24:05):
An hour and no one would ever die in a
car accident.

Speaker 4 (24:08):
This was my COVID argument. They are trying to get
down to zero deaths. From COVID. I was like, this
is insane. All cars should be limited, you know, governed
at five miles an hour. Can't go blow you know
you'll get there. What's the big deal? You'll get there
at five miles an hour. Why don't you get there
so much faster? No Clay. I think also you could
make kind of a civilizational argument. Maybe this is going

(24:28):
too far, but Western civilization and all the prosperity and
the advances and everything was built in societies that, let's
be honest, flourished with booze, nicotine, and caffeine. Okay, weed
was not a part of the There was not a
helpful part of the equation. All right, this is not
like something that has existed while we've been flourishing and

(24:48):
growing and building. So again, I've just experiencing in a
New York city. You know what happened to play in
this happened in my neighborhood. A weed store pops up,
and in New York I think it's decriminalized. It's not
really legal, by the way, it's all illegal under federal law. Still,
so there's a huge issue with nullification of federal law

(25:08):
that comes to all of this. But what happens is
the store moves into your neighborhood and then all of
a sudden you find yourself saying, well, who's going to
that store? And what kind of people are gathered around?
And now they're smoking weed on your block. And now
they start dealing outside the store because they've got other store.
It's just spirals. It's bad. It's like, why, why do
you not want a porn shop on your corner, same

(25:29):
reason you don't want a weed shop on your corner.

Speaker 3 (25:32):
I think it's interesting too. They to your point, because
of federal law, these companies. I was reading about this
this morning, and I've heard about this from several law firms.
The weed companies can't have access to banking, so they
just trapped. They almost entirely are moving money via cash,
and they have to have these I think there was
a big article in the New York Times I was

(25:53):
reading this morning where in order to pay out employees,
they don't have payroll processing. They have to give them
all cash, and so they have to have these massive
implements of security to move everything around because unlike much
of modern commerce, they still aren't all set up. Now
I wanted, yeah, I was gonna play.

Speaker 1 (26:14):
Should I play Scarborough here? Let me play Scarboro.

Speaker 4 (26:17):
Let's pray Scarborough minute? Because we want to talk you
mentioned commerce. Let's play Scarborough when we come back. So
we talk a lot here about the need to align
with conservative values and to spend money with companies that
share your values, right, all of our sponsors, for example,
but we also want to be a part of this
movement and building a parallel economy that is all about

(26:38):
patriotism America and shares the values of this audience was paramount.
So Clay and I came together and we decided, you
know what, let's start a company. Let's start a company
where we're going to sell a premium product to this audience,
to all of you, that embodies the spirit of America
and Clay. That's how we came up with Crockett Coffee,
which we are launching today here on the show. We're

(26:59):
excited about it. You get to Crocketcoffee dot com. But
Clay talk a little bit why Davy Crockett, right, that
was the inspiration for this coffee brand. Then I'll tell
everybody how delicious it is.

Speaker 1 (27:08):
I'm drinking right here.

Speaker 3 (27:09):
You're history nerds, as you all know, and Buck's holding
up the mug. And one of my childhood heroes was
Davy Crockett, and his motto was be sure you're right
and then go ahead. And there have been so many
companies out there, and I know you guys have experienced
this that are afraid to own what many of you

(27:30):
out there listening right now believe in at least half.
I think a lot of times the stuff we're saying
as seventy five or eighty percent of the marketplace. And
we didn't have a coffee on this show, and you
and I both like coffee. I stopped drinking soda for
the most part because my wife was on me, Hey,
you got to get healthier, and gotta get healthier.

Speaker 1 (27:49):
So I drink coffee every day. I'm drinking coffee right now.

Speaker 3 (27:52):
I've got Crockett coffee in my mug in my glass here,
and I think you guys are gonna love it, and
I think you're gonna love everything the brand stands for.
We're going to donate profits proceeds to Tunnel the Towers
as a part of giving back, and we want to
build something in this universe where we don't all we
love our advertisers, but we don't want to always have

(28:13):
to rely on an advertiser to give us the ability
to say everything that we want to say every day.

Speaker 4 (28:19):
Well, and the other thing is we're going to be
building out with some of our favorite people in this space.
We will Crockett Coffee. First of all, you know, the
Tunnel to Towers Foundation connection is so important to us
because we just love what that organization does and stands for.
In a portion of the proceeds will go to Tunnel
to Towers. You set this up with them, they couldn't
be more excited about the partnership as well. Another thing

(28:40):
is we wanted this to be a top tier coffee,
meaning the actual roast, the actual beans. Is I'm a
coffee fanatic, maybe even a little snobby about having to
have good coffee. I don't like coffee that isn't high quality.
And that's what we took months and months and months
to find the best beans, the best roaster, the best
coffee we possibly could. And that's why you go to

(29:01):
Crocketcoffee dot com and you can have it ship to you.
Please join up a lot of you can subscribe and
then it will be shipped to you every month. But
another thing Clay. A part of the mission here is
we're going to have other folks that we know friends
of ours in the space, who are also going to
be partners of ours, to be selling Crockett down the line.
We will never abandon the conservative space. We will never

(29:22):
abandon patriotism. This will always be there for those who
share our values to drink and those who want to
become down the line evangelist for the brand can do
so so. Crocketcoffee dot Com, Crockett Coffee dot Com, please
go sign up. I'm drinking out every day. I have
been drinking out every day for weeks. It's absolutely delicious.
But we want to help build and this is the

(29:43):
first and many projects we're going to be involved in
that help build a parallel economy, a conservative patriotic.

Speaker 2 (29:49):
You're listening to the best of Claytrapvis and Buck Sexton.

Speaker 4 (29:53):
Welcome back in to Clay and Buck. I really appreciate
all of you who are already checking out Crocketcoffee dot Com.
Thank you so much for that. I drink it every day,
Clay drinks it every day. Our friends and family already
have been tasting it and making sure it's perfection, and
we are hoping that as many of as possible please
this is I mean, it's us, it is of us,
it is aligned with your values. And the story of

(30:15):
Davy Crockett's amazing. You know, it had a big resurgence.
Clay just the history of Davy Crockett about seventy years
ago when Disney became really interested in it. And he's
a fascinating guy in his life. I don't even realize
there was a time when Davy Crockett was talked about.
Not not only did he run for Congress and became a
member of Congress, there were some people in Tennessee who

(30:38):
approached him to be a possible presidential candidate. That was
talked about. I mean, he was a guy who came
from a cabin in the woods and moved from one
cabin to another and had some very hard breaks in
his life and was just had such a force of
personality and really became a frontier legend. And we just
thought the spirit of Davy Crockett was so exceptional that

(30:58):
it was a perfect embodiment of the brand and what
we wanted to represent, and.

Speaker 3 (31:03):
Also just believing in American exceptionalism, in American greatness. There's
so many brands out there that would be afraid to
even have an association with someone from American history because
they're like, oh, my goodness, Davy Crockett, he was in
the eighteen hundreds.

Speaker 1 (31:18):
He's a white guy. He must be awful.

Speaker 3 (31:21):
We want everybody out there with the pioneer spirit, with
an embrace of risk taking and a frontier mindset to
really kind of We've talked about the show a lot,
Lewis and Clark, how I still think the Lewis and
Clark Expedition would become the most popular show ever. We've
talked about Yellowstone. I think there's still very much of
a frontier mindset in many parts of this country that's

(31:42):
having its back turned on.

Speaker 4 (31:44):
And taking risks and building it yourself. I mean, that's
another part of this. We have so much admiratio you
guys all know. I even talked about Elon Musk, admire
what he has done and what he chose to do
for the good of the country. With X it wasn't
to make money formerly Twitter, but also whether it's Rumble
or truth, Social and these and all of our brands

(32:05):
that we work with here on the show that we
do advertisements for, they are doing this. They are building
this economy because we will never have true freedom, we
will never have constitutional, constitutional governance in this country if
the people with the purse strings are basically lunatic leftists
who can just shut you down at the prop of

(32:26):
a hat. And that's what we've seen for a lot
of different people and a lot of different brands out there,
and you know, a lot of different brands out there
in the world. We all know about the wokeness canceling people.
So we are creating an unsinkable aircraft carrier of patriotism
and free speech with this company and hopefully embodying that
build it yourself FRONTI your spirit. So that's how we

(32:47):
came together with it.

Speaker 3 (32:48):
And this audience knows better than anybody what they did
to Rush, because really he was the first person that
they tried to cancel by coming after him for the
opinions that he shared. And we love the advertisers that
we have, but this is not bucket me taking a
licensing deal. We started this company from zero, uh, and
it we are you, me and your brother, like we're
running it so like this is legit our company. This

(33:12):
is not some crazy shadow thing where we're taking money
like this is we we have the equity, we have
the company, and we want to build a great American
coffee brand. Yea.

Speaker 4 (33:21):
And I hope that other top conservative voices will want
to be a part of what we're doing as well.
And what you know, that they'll be able to look
at us as as a possible sponsor for them as
we grow that will never say, oh someone wrote an
angry tweeted us, And we don't know. We don't know
if really the Constitution is something we can support with

(33:42):
our you know. So that's and this is the for
We have other projects in mind as well, you know
that we want to be a part of, but for
right now, this is the centerpiece. And like I said,
also raising money for Tonta Towers. So it's it's it's phenomenal.
We're really looking forward to it and you know, appreciate
all of you are who are subscribing at Crockotcoffee dot com.
So with all that said, Clay and will remind some
folks later on the show about all this speaking of

(34:06):
the parallel economy, or rather needing money to keep the
fight going. You see, Trump posted the full one hundred
and seventy five million dollar bond did while he's appealing
the civil fraud penalty against him from the state of
New York. The you know you brought up Rush before.
I don't think the left has ever mounted such a

(34:26):
all of the above like economic warfare campaign against one individual.
The closest thing would be when they were trying to
attack Rush Limbaugh for so many years, you know, trying
to attack his advertisers, and Rush, because he was superhuman
in his own way, was able to just keep pushing through,
keep building the movement. But what Trump is pushing through
right now is just he's running for president. He's got

(34:49):
the four criminal trials outstanding, and one hundred and seventy
five million dollars he's had to put up for bail.
Who has one hundred and seventy five million dollar bond.

Speaker 1 (34:56):
They have to post, and how about Buck.

Speaker 3 (34:59):
In thirteen days, the trial in New York City starts,
so that is going to be up on us very quickly.
We'll see whether that's going to have any substantial impact
or not. We'll break all that down for you. Thanks
to all of you. By the way, Mason is following
the Google analytics within two minutes of us doing the
mention over a thousand.

Speaker 1 (35:19):
Of you were on the website, so I.

Speaker 3 (35:21):
Can't promise that it's not going to crash, but that
is a testament to how many of you are willing
to immediate.

Speaker 4 (35:28):
Try to make a crash. All of you should go
to the site, go check it out, rockocoffee dot com

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