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Mike shares his love for The Simpsons and classic movies he discovered watching the show as a kid after they did parodies of them. He gives his list of perfect parodies of famous films executed on the show during the 90’s. Mike talks to Director Andrew Davis about how he felt after the Simpsons parodies his movie The Fugitive, working with Tommy Lee Jones and Harrison Ford and how he feels about people watching his work on phone screens. In the Movie Review, Mike shares his thoughts in the new Netflix movie Leave the World Behind starring Julia Roberts and Ethan Hawke. The movie is about a family vacation that gets interrupted by two strangers bearing news of a blackout. As the threat grows, both families must decide how best to survive the potential crisis, all while grappling with their own place in this collapsing world. Mikes lets you know why this movie ultimately let him down after starting gout with so much promise. In the Trailer Park, Mike continues with his Godzilla fandom and breaks down the big action in Godzilla x Kong: The New Empire which is the fifth installment in the Monsterverse series of movies.

 

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Episode Transcript

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Speaker 1 (00:00):
Hello, and welcome back to Movie Mike's movie podcast. I
am your host Movie Mike, and if there's something that
I could love almost as much as I love movies,
it would be the Simpsons. And in this episode, I
found a way to combine those two loves. I'm going
to share with you six perfect parodies of iconic movies
that the Simpsons did back in the nineties. We'll also
talk to the director of The Fugitive and I'll let

(00:20):
you know the way those two things tie in. That
movie is celebrating its thirtieth anniversary, so we'll talk to
Andrew Davis about working with Harrison Ford and Tommy Lee
Jones in the movie review. If I can only do
one part of this episode, it would be talking about
Leave the World Behind on Netflix. Ah, that movie made
me feel so many things. And in the trailer Park,
continuing my Godzilla kick, we'll talk about Godzilla and Kong

(00:42):
the New Empire. Thank you for being here, Thank you
for being subscribed, Shout out to the Monday Morning Movie crew.
And now let's talk movies. In a world where everyone
and their mother has a podcast, one man stands to
infiltrate the ears of listeners like never before in a
movie podcast a man with so much movie knowledge, he's

(01:03):
basically like oh walking IMTB with glasses from the Nashville
Podcast Network. This is Movie Mike Movie Podcast. If you
know me, you know that I love The Simpsons. I
was born in the nineties, grew up watching them all
the time, even when my parents didn't want me to.
And I credit any ounce of funny that I have,

(01:24):
even if it's just one percent funny, to The Simpsons
and what I've learned about writing and just the essence
of comedy by watching the show in my studio right now.
One of my favorite things I have in the back
wall if you watch my videos on YouTube or TikTok,
is a sign Simpsons script from one of my favorite
episodes ever that I got as a Christmas gift and
the only other podcast I could probably do an entire

(01:46):
thing I would be a Simpsons podcast, but that would
be so niche, even more so than movies that I
don't do that. And I've been trying to do an
episode like this for a while now, but it wasn't
until I had an interview opportunity with the director of
The Fugitive. Name is Andrew Davis, and I thought, oh man,
the way I learned about that movie was by watching
The Simpsons. So I wanted to share with you six

(02:07):
times at the Simpsons parody day movie back in the nineties,
and in most cases, since I was still a kid
watching all of these episodes, this is how I learned
about a lot of iconic movies because at the time,
when I was a kid watching these episodes, I didn't
realize that they were doing a parody of something. I
just thought, oh man, the Simpsons have the best writing.

(02:28):
How did they come up with this stuff? But as
my love of film grew and I started to realize, oh,
these are based on movies, I in turn would go
and watch these movies because I wanted to see what
the source material was. So I feel like this probably
happened to a lot of people, that we were exposed
to movies on The Simpsons without knowing it. So let's

(02:49):
get into it. Here are six examples of Simpsons movie parodies.
The first one I want to share with you was
from an episode called twenty two Short Films about Springfield,
Season seven, episode twenty two, and and the movie this
entire episode is really based on is Pulp fiction. This
is one of the best animated episodes of any show,
and I'm biased here because of how much I love

(03:10):
the Simpsons. But what this episode is is a series
of twenty two different short stories inside of one episode.
So each story is a minute, a minute and a half,
sometimes two minutes, sometimes a few seconds, but it's showing
you all the lives of the characters. And the thing
that's so great about this episode as how they are
all intertwined. One scene ends and that serves as the

(03:31):
kickoff for the next scene. But what this entire episode
really is is a loose parody throughout the entire thing
of pulp fiction, mostly with the interactions with Chief Wigham
him eventually chasing the criminal snake and they get into
this brawl and end up in somebody's basement, and that
is where the main focus of the parody of pulp
fiction takes place. But I just love that the Simpsons

(03:52):
always committed to doing things line for line, scene for scene,
and this is a great example of that. So here's
the digal interaction in pulp fiction between John Travolta and
Samuel L. Jackson. You know what a funny thing about
Europe is what it's the little differences. Example, you know
what they call a quarter pound with cheese in and

(04:15):
what did they call it? They call it royal with cheese.
Roy Yeah with cheese, And then the Simpsons just did
a straight up parody of that in this episode. You know.
The funniest thing though, it's the little differences. Example, well,
McDonald you can buy a Krusty burger with cheese, right,
but they don't call it a Krusty burger with cheese.
Shut out all out of that, call it a quarter

(04:35):
pounded with cheese, a quarter pounded with cheese. I love
this episode. That's why I wanted to share this one
with you first. Next up, number two. The movie that
they parodied here was The Shining, which came out in
nineteen eighty and this episode comes to us from season six,
episode six, tree House of Horror five. Now, I could
do an entire series on just the horror movies that

(04:57):
they parodied in all of the Treehouse of episodes. That
is really what these episodes are known for. But I
remember discovering The Shining because of the Simpsons and because
of this episode, which this is one of their best
Halloween episodes ever. It was so iconic that I remember
the promos that ran on TV for this episode. So
in this episode, much like in the movie, the Simpsons

(05:18):
family heads off to be the caretakers of mister Burns's
spooky winter lodge, and then when Homer gets there, he
discovers that he doesn't have a supply of beer and
he doesn't have TV, causing him to go crazy, and
much like Jack Nicholson in The Shining, goes and tries
to kill his family. And the thing I love about
the Treehouse of Horror episodes, at least back in the
nineties is they had three different segments that were entirely

(05:41):
self contained, so they were able to take the entire
Shining movie and take all the best, most iconic parts
of that and do it in about six to seven minutes.
They covered all the iconic scenes like the blood and
the elevator, the twins at the end of the hallway,
the scene at the bar in the lodge, seeing the
deranged right on the typewriter. But hands down, the best

(06:02):
gag they did was the iconic here's Johnny seen So
here's the original from The Shining, Here's Johnny, and here's
the version from The Simpsons Johnny, So I put this
one at number two at number three from the episode
Cape Fear, which is season five episode two. Well you

(06:23):
guessed it. They did a parody of the remake, which
came out in nineteen ninety one, starring the one and
only Robert de Niro, So much like in that movie,
Krusty's X sidekick Sideshow Bob returns to Springfield to get
revenge against Bart after Bart exposed his murder plot, sending
him to prison. So in the real movie Cape Fear,
at least the nineteen ninety one version, Robert De Niro's

(06:44):
character gets sent to prison for fourteen years. The attorney
in that movie knowingly withholds information that would have had
him acquitted, so the entire time he holds it against
him in prison. So then he gets out and then
stalks this lawyer and his family who originally defended him.
The nineteen ninety one k Fear was a remake of
the nineteen sixty two movie, and both of those movies

(07:05):
were based on a book called The Executioners that came
out in nineteen fifty seven. But this episode came out
back in nineteen ninety three, so I really don't remember
when it originally aired, but I do know the first
time I watched it, much like the other ones I've
been telling you, I had no idea that it was
based on a movie. And it wasn't until much much
later that I saw just a still of Robert de
Niro in the theater, laughing and smoking a cigar that

(07:27):
I thought, Hey, that looks a lot like that scene
from the episode with Sycho Bob doing the exact same thing.
And then I realized, oh, it's a movie. So here's
a little bit of that scene in the nineteen ninety
one movie. What it's a Robert de Niro in that
theater with the family. They're all watching Problem Child, which

(07:50):
was an odd choice for a movie, and he is
laughing and smoking a cigar. And this is how the
Simpsons did a parody of that. Man's so rude. Yeah,
if you don't mind, we're trying to watch the mover.
How am I getting my head out of this toe? Oh? Really, no,

(08:13):
that's too much. And I think that right there is
a great example of the misdirection I learned by watching
The Simpsons, because they're doing a parody and in the
film they get upset because he's being obnoxious, distracting everybody
from enjoying the movie. The Simpsons take that and they
do the same thing, but then they flip the script
because Homer becomes the more obnoxious one, to the point

(08:36):
that he gets a rise out of the guy who
is ruining it for everybody in this situation. That was
side show Bob, voiced by Kelsey Grammer, who hands down
is one of the best voice actors, not just that
Sideshow Bob, but he also plays and voice beasts in
the X Men movies, but hands down even more so
than Fraser. My favorite role of his is when he
voices sideshow Bob. So this one had to make it

(08:57):
at number three. At number four, the episode is Bart
of Darkness from season six, episode one. Hands down, I
think my favorite season of The Simpsons ever. I still
have the box set of DVD's, which is how I
was exposed to a lot of these episodes watching them
on DVD with the commentary. Without the commentary, I know
these episodes so much that I could quote the deleted scenes,

(09:20):
primarily from season six, but that's the episode. The movie
they are paroting here is Rear Window, which came out
in nineteen fifty four from director Alfred Hitchcock. So how
they parody this movie is Bart breaks his leg at
the beginning of summer vacation so has to spend the
entire thing from his bedroom and he becomes really isolated
and weird, and he gets these binoculars and just starts

(09:42):
creeping in on everybody's windows in Springfield. They even do
a direct parody because one of the windows he peeps
into is actually Jimmy Stewart's character from Rear Window. But
much like his character did in that movie, Bart discovers
that his neighbor ned Flanders may have merged his wife
and kids. So this entire episode plot point for plot

(10:04):
point is essentially Rear Window, except he's spying on everybody
with the telescope. So that's why I added this one
at number four on my list. At number five, the
episode is Bart's friend falls in Love from Season three,
episode twenty three, and the movie they are parting here
is Raiders of the Lost Arc, which came out in
nineteen eighty one, and there is no better representation of

(10:25):
how great the Simpsons were in the nineties than this
scene alone, even if it wasn't a movie parody. And
what I love about this episode and the movie tie
in is that this starts from the very beginning of
the episode, and it's something they really don't do anymore
of taking big, bold wrists like this, and the way
that they were able to parody this scene basically with
all the major elements from Raiders of the Lost Arc

(10:49):
with in that movie, it's Harrison Ford stealing this precious
artifact and then escaping because as soon as he moves it,
the entire thing comes crashing down and it was booby trapped,
so he has to get out of there with his
life as all these things are trying to kill him.
In this episode did a great job of doing exactly
what they did in that movie. The way the Simpsons
did it is Bart was trying to steal Homer's big

(11:11):
old change jar that he had in his room, and
as soon as he grabs it, Homer starts chasing him
in his underwear. So you have Bart running through the
house and at one point Homer in his underwear is
barreling down the stairs and he essentially looks like the Boulder,
and Raiders with the Lost Arc you have Maggie shooting
darts at Bart and Homer much like they do in
the Harrison Ford scene. But hands down the best part

(11:33):
is whenever Bart tries to escape from the garage, Homer
slams on the door to have it come down, and
just in the nick of time, Bart gets through and
still has time to reach back and grab his hat
like Indiana Jones did. So here's just a little bit
of that scene. That is such a great way to

(12:05):
start an episode and just a great way to pay
homage to such an iconic film, which is something that
Simpsons have done throughout the history of the show, even
in the Simpsons movie in two thousand and seven, working
in other movie references inside of that movie. It just
shows you how sophisticated their writers are. And if you
think that all the people who write for the Simpsons

(12:27):
are a bunch of dummies. In the original run of
the show back in the nineties, back in the Golden Age,
there were all mostly Ivy League students, primarily Harvard graduates.
One of the most famous Simpsons writers all time was
Conan O'Brien himself, who is a really smart and intelligent guy.
But you take people with all that book smart knowledge
and make them write comedy, it just puts it on

(12:50):
an entirely different level. And I think that's why throughout
the history of the show you have all these references
and parodies of movies that you have to be a
nerd to under stand and to even know where to
look to find these. So I think watching The Simpsons
so much as a kid just attributed to my love
of film, And now looking back on all the influential

(13:11):
film that they have parodied over the years, they are
some of the greatest movies of all time that I
may not have discovered if it wouldn't have been for
this show, because combined with me rewatching all these episodes
on DVD, that led to the first incarnation of Netflix,
where you would actually go online and get DVDs delivered
to your house. That's what I would do. I would

(13:31):
just go through this big list of Okay, here are
all these iconic movies I've seen on The Simpsons. Now
I have to watch the real movie. So the final
parody I want to share with you is from an
episode called Lisa's Rival, which was also in season six,
episode two, and they parodied the movie The Fugitive, which
came out back in nineteen ninety three starring Harrison Ford
and Tommy Lee Jones and it's celebrating its thirtieth anniversary

(13:53):
right now, And I forgot how good this movie was.
I just rewatched it and it reminded me how much
this movie attributed my love of thrillers. The movie is
about Harrison Ford's character who gets accused of killing his
wife then goes to prison for it. As they are
transporting him to prison, the bus crashes and he escapes
and becomes well a fugitive. And then Tommy Lee Jones'

(14:15):
character is relentless in capturing Harrison Ford and getting him
back to prison. But the entire time, Harrison Ford is
using that time while he has escaped to prove his innocence.
So it's a great movie directed by Andrew Davis, and
that leads us to our interview now with Andrew Davis,
who is the director of the movie. He is known
for making sophisticated thrillers like this. Like I said, The

(14:36):
Fugitive is celebrating its thirtieth anniversary this year and had
just released on four k UHD for the first time ever.
I have a copy. Now we get into an entire
discussion of why physical media is so important. But the
movie went on to receive seven Oscar nominations, including Best Picture,
Best Actor for Harrison Ford and Tommy Lee Jones ended
up winning for Best Supporting Actor. Back in nineteen ninety four,

(14:59):
Andrew Davis was also nominated for a Golden Goal for
Best Director. In addition to this movie, he also directed
one of my favorite movies from my childhood, Holes, which
ironically just celebrated its twentieth anniversary. So all the movies
I know in love are getting older, much like me.
So for my final item on this list, we're actually
going to talk to Andrew Davis how he feels about

(15:20):
the Simpsons doing a parody of his movie The Fugitive,
and then we'll get into him talking about working with
Tommy Lee Jones and Harrison Ford. The first time I
learned about The Fugitive was watching them parody the scene
from the Damn. I'm telling you, I didn't do anything.
I don't care. So I got to know, as a director,

(15:46):
how does it feel when the Simpsons parody your movie?
It's wonderful. I mean, I knew that I had sort
of made the big leaves when I was in San
Francisco and I picked up MED magazine and talked about
underslush for undersea, and then there were then then shortly
thereafter was the stugitive. When they started making fun of you,

(16:07):
it's either because they like it or they hate it,
and in these cases they like. The line they chose
to use was the Tommy Lee Jones line, I don't care.
I didn't kill my wife. I don't care. In the script?
Was that supposed to be a big moment, a big
because it's a key turning point in the entire movie
of him in the beginning saying how he doesn't care
right or wrong, but it all comes back around. Was

(16:29):
it supposed to be that impactful in the script? You know,
this is a controversial line because I've read articles where
Harrison's talked about, well, there were pages and pages of
dialogue and we decided to throw all that out and
just say I don't care. And Tommy thinks he created
that line. Jeff Stewart doesn't remember exactly how it happened.

(16:50):
He thinks he created that line. And now somebody found
an old draft, a Walter Hill draft, where it says
I don't care you're a fugitive. So whoever came up
with it seems, you know, it's It reverberates so much
because this is basically saying, my job is not to
decide whether you're guilty or innocent. It's just to bring

(17:11):
you in. You know. My job is to bring you
in and let the course decide, and let the justice
Department decide. And so that's why. And then and then
in the story of course, Tommy develops his empathy for
this doctor who's still trying to save people, still trying
to run an investigation. It doesn't you know. So he
realizes this doesn't make sense. Why would the guy be

(17:31):
doing all this if he's if he's trying to just disappear.
In the movie, Tommy Lee Jones character is just relentless,
And I got to imagine that Tommy Lee Jones just
has that like I just picture him being like that
in person. So is that how he actually just approached
the character and was like around set? Well, you know,
he's a professional actor, you know, he's not someone who

(17:52):
who carries that character when he goes home tonight, you know,
to eat dinner. He's able to just bring it to
the set and play it on the set. He basically
became the godfather to those marshals. He was he was
the leader. He was their boss, he was was his family,
you know, so that that helped him have that that

(18:12):
banter back and forth to everybody. I just think, you know,
he's a very smart guy who figured out how to
how to how to have this role be part of him.
And you know, this is a role that's triggered to
many other characters. And you know, you look at Men
in Black, that's that's a different version of Gerard. Now
in the movie, Harrison Ford and Timi Lee Jones, they

(18:32):
don't have a lot of screen like screen time together
because it's all the cat and Mouse gave him him
trying to capture him. Was there any like rule on
set that they couldn't be around each other because they
would take away from the illusion, It would take away
from that tension of where their character needed to be
in that mindset. No, No, I mean, you know, we
were together on the damn we were together in the tunnel.

(18:53):
We were together of course at the end of the movie. Yeah,
but you know it wasn't like, oh, you can't get
near each other because you may become friends and it'll
ruin your relationship. You know, they're they're too sophisticated to
deal with that. You know, they really didn't have much
time together, and yet they really appreciated working together on
the movie. My favorite thing about the movie is the

(19:14):
tension that it build really from the very beginning, Right
at the very start of the movie, I'm immediately sucked
into this story and I want to take the ride
with these characters. I want to know, when making a
thriller like this, how do you create that tension? Is
it on the page in the script, is it in
the moment when you're filming it, or is it an
a post where you just feel that tension. It's all

(19:34):
the above, it's all the above. All those elements have
to work. You know, the basic story and the caring
about this guy who's unjustly accused. This guy was there
given as part of the whole basis of Lena's Robla,
going back to, you know, the basis of the story
that was created here for the TV show that became

(19:54):
so popular that we adapted it. And then you know,
on the set every day we came up with things
that sort of enhanced and embellished what we were trying
to do. And then, of course, in post production, with
all this footage available and brilliant editors and a great soundtrack.
It sort of all comes together. When the movie gets

(20:15):
nominated for Best Picture and you're up against Shindler's List.
Do you ever think of yourself, should we have put
this movie out in a different year? I did? I did?
I think, how are you going to be a story
like that and a film that was that well made?
But you know, you know, probably if Schindler's List wasn't
out that year, we may have won. But it's okay,
I mean, but the legacy of the movie goes on.

(20:37):
I feel like it inspired an entire genre in the
nineties of trying to create a thriller like this. If
you were to go back to making your very first film, ever,
what is the one thing you would do differently about
your first film? It's very interesting. Did you say that?
Because I just came back from a screening of my
first film. Stony Island is being re released, and we

(20:58):
had a screening at the Cisco Center. It's available on
all these platforms. If you look at Stony Island, you'll
see the Fugitive. You'll see a lot of the textures
of the fugitive are in my first film, and they
carried on to other films through Above the Law to
the package chain reaction. Those are all films that were
shot in Chicago and have this kind of reality of
the city and the people in the city. And what's

(21:19):
interesting about Living on the Blue ray? The four K
Blu ray is so good looking and it actually looks
better than the original movie, I think, and as people
can get their hands on that Blu ray and get
the right player, they can experience the movie. I just
talked to somebody who said he was blown away by
how the quality of what it looks like today. So

(21:41):
in some ways it's got it's been reborn. I mean
that is music to my ears because I am such
a stickler about quality, and I tell people, when you're
just streaming all these things, you're losing out on the quality,
or if you're not going to see it in theaters,
you're not seeing it the way it was meant to
be seen. So for a movie like The Fugitive, when
you hear somebody maybe seeing it on their phone, what
does that make you feel? Well, glad that they can

(22:02):
follow it on their phone and they still care about it,
But it makes me feel like they're not getting the
full effort in the full effect of what the movie is.
You know. So when now in a sixty five inch
monitor with the Blu Ray, it's looking better than it
even looks in the theater. So watch it at home. Everybody,
get that Blu Ray. My final question for you was
working with Harrison Ford. Is there ever an urge to

(22:24):
call him Han or Indy at any point? No? Call
him Harry. That was his name in high school. People
came to visit the set, who went to Harry? How
are you Harry? Well? I appreciate it. I love the movie.
Hope everybody gets a chance to check it out on
Blu ray and see it how it was meant to
be seen, if not even better. Thanks a lot, nice
making you, Mike. Thank you. Let's get into it now.

(22:45):
A spoiler free movie review today, we're talking about Leave
the World Behind, which is on Netflix. It's also in theaters.
This is a review that I've been waiting to do.
And when I say that, it's because either I was
so passionate about a movie. I loved it so much
I can't wait to share it with you. The other reason,
and I say that, is because I was so infuriated

(23:05):
by a movie that I cannot wait to tell you
about it. Which is this one? This is the one
I was infuriated with because I love movies about the
end of the world, one of my favorite genres. I
think about the end of the world all the time.
My most reoccurring dream is the world ending of things
coming from the sky, and I've had that in my
life since I've been like thirteen years old. Torments me.

(23:26):
So I love movies about the end of the world,
movies that do it well, let me say, and that
is exactly what this movie is about. And the cast
is amazing, the one and only Julia Roberts, Ethan Hawk,
Maherschela Ahli. Those three actors combined alone should make it
just all out enjoyable. And then you have Kevin Bacon
thrown in there, who I feel is the X factor

(23:47):
in that casting, because maybe if it was eighties nineties
Kevin Bacon, I'd be like, oh, yeah, it's gonna be great.
But now when I see Kevin Bacon cast in a movie,
I start to question their decision. The movie is based
on a book, and I know that I'm gonna get
it to some things I didn't like about it, And
people are gonna yell in the come and saying it's
based on a book. If it's based on a book,
they should have fixed the things while making the movie

(24:07):
that the book got wrong then. But it's also from
the executive producer and director of Mister Robot, which lines
up perfectly with the material we have here in this movie.
So what it's about is Julia Roberts and Ethan Hank
are married. They're living in the city and they decide
they want to go away for a weekend and a
really fancy airbnb. They're spending a weekend away with their kids,

(24:29):
enjoying life. They're out on the beach one day and
this giant ship just comes onto the beach where they are,
and it's really weird, but they think nothing of it
at the time. And then some other weird things happening
with their cell phones networking with a Wi Fi being down,
and this movie just starts to create all of these
weird elements and all of this mystery. And then they

(24:49):
get a knock in the middle of the night and
it's Maherschelo Ali's character, who is the actual owner of
the home, and he gives them a story on why
he shows up on their doorstep. So this one has
to be very careful with because I don't want to
ruin it for you, because I will say at the
start of this that I was still highly entertained by
this movie. I would even say oddly entertained by it,

(25:10):
because again I love movies about the end of the world.
And then you have Marshall Ali's character, who is there
with this daughter, so you have them two coming together
with Ethan Hank, Julia Roberts and their two kids. What
this movie did very early, I would say, in the
first thirty minutes. So I don't think this is spoiling anything.
But I realized that the movie had bitten off more

(25:30):
than it could chew, and I just it just hit
me that I knew that all the little things it
was setting in place, it was never going to be
able to deliver on everything that I wanted as far
as answering all the things. It reminded me of one
of my favorite shows of all time. Lost. People either
love or hate that show, mainly because at the end
of Lost, you don't get all the answers of what

(25:53):
happened on the island. I am on the other side
of that that I loved Lost, and I believe that
it was more about the journey than the destination was lost.
They had such great characters that I bonded with, and
I felt like I went through a lot of things
through the course of that show that even though the
finale was what it was, I found that the journey

(26:15):
getting there I enjoyed. I experienced something that you can't
take away from me. So for me, that entire show
isn't ruined because I didn't know what a smoke monster
was at the end of it. So in that case,
I had a more rational approach. In this case, with
this movie that's two hours and twenty minutes, almost two
and a half, there were so many things going on
and so much mystery being built that it never really

(26:37):
fully satisfied me. Throughout the movie, they're trying to figure
out why all of these catastrophic and weird events are
happening around them. There's also a lot of tension between
all of the characters, primarily between Julia Roberts's character and
myherschel Ali, of her not fully trusting him for some
odd reason and him kind of having this dark, hidden
pass that he's not being fully upfront with them. Either.

(26:59):
So there's a lot of back and forth between just
characters not trusting each other, but also them trying to
figure out why they don't have internet. Is it just
a blackout? Is it something bigger? And throughout the entire movie,
there's just all these things just getting bigger and stronger
and bigger and stronger until you wait for it for
the big thing to finally happen and it's fully revealed

(27:20):
exactly what is going on here. And I would have
to say that I have never wanted to know the
ending more while watching a movie. This was one that
I was like, I gotta see it through to the end,
just because I need to know how this movie ends.
So credit to them for hooking me in and creating
all this mystery to really make me want to finish
a movie, which is really important with a Netflix movie

(27:42):
right now, they're so focused on their completion rate that
this is a movie that will get you to want
to watch the entire movie. That being said, it felt
like it was doing an impression of m Night Shyamalan
mixed with Jordan Peel. Those are two directors who do
a movie like this really well. We're getting some big
mystery and then there's gonna be some overarching theme or

(28:04):
overarching message that the movie was trying to convey. It
never really had its own distinctive style that I was
just kind of craving. It really tried to do it
through the use of cinematography. Now, if I have to
give this movie just gold stars for it's because of
how great it looked visually. That is really what had
me suck in in this movie. That I found myself
saying a lot throughout it is how did they get

(28:27):
that shot? They did it a lot at the start
of the film. The first instance was when the family
was driving out in their jeep to the rental house
that there was a camera move that went from outside
of the car into the car. You get a glimpse
of every member of the family, and then the camera
is outside of the car. So I feel like that
was some trickery with some fake windows, But there were

(28:47):
a lot of shots like that that were really jarring,
maybe a little bit too much, too flashy, that they
were trying a little bit too hard to create that
style of going from horizontal to vertical inside the house
to outside of the house. You also see like all
the levels of the houses the camera would pay from
top to bottom, so visually there was a lot to

(29:07):
look at, and I have to respect their commitment to
making this movie look and feel unique because it keeps
your eyes on the screen. It was almost like they
filmed this movie incursive. It is hard to review this
one spoiler free because primarily my issue with it was
not being satisfied by the ending. And the reason that
is is because for a movie to take me on

(29:27):
a two and almost half hour journey and to not
have any closure, even if it was based on the book,
and that's exactly how the book ends. I was left
with cinematic blue balls after watching this movie because the
story started out with so much promise, building all this
mystery and me trying to figure it out on my
own by the character's actions and picking up on things

(29:50):
you said this here and you said that there, Are
you lying? Are you telling the truth? Are you really
who you say you are? And then to get to
a point where not only are none of those those
questions answered, but the grand scheme of thing just felt
like a waste of time. That is the biggest takeaway
of this movie. It felt like, what was the point
of going on this journey with these characters to get

(30:12):
to this destination that I wasn't any better off than
when I started this movie, and this movie just felt
like it was trying to be something else, like Netflix
attached themselves to this story because they wanted another bird
Box that was gonna get people talking by creating this
psychological end of world type movie to recapture that energy
of a movie that everybody watches and talks about, which

(30:33):
I have seen a lot of people watching this movie,
but have also seen people having that same reaction I had,
of being pretty let down by the time you watch it.
That being said, even though I didn't love this movie,
I would still encourage you if you, like me, were
intrigued by the trailer of wanting to give this movie
a chance. Maybe it's because you love Julia Roberts or
Ethan hank Commercial Ali. I still think this movie is entertaining.

(30:57):
But I'm here just to warn you about a movie
that starts out with so much promise and will probably
leave you disappointed because it's not even that it's a
full on bad movie in its own right. It's still
an entertaining movie and probably did what it set out
to do. It just wasn't for me and just didn't
leave me feeling good at the end. So based on

(31:18):
entertainment value and also based on the fact that you
did have a good cast here. The acting was actually
on point throughout this entire movie. But being what it is,
I give leave the world behind three out of five blackouts.
It's time to head down to movie Mike trailor Paul Ah. Yes,
I am now in full Godzilla geek out mode. After

(31:41):
last week I shared with you my five out of
five film Godzilla minus one. Still highly encourage you to
go check out that movie. But now right after that,
I guess they did this perfectly the time out with that,
but we got the trailer for god Zilla and Kong
the New Empire, which I gotta say, after watching Godzilla

(32:03):
Minus one and seeing the trailer for this movie, and
even though I love the Monster Verse, it just doesn't
look the same. It's hard to go back. It's like
how I imagined a dog would feel if you were
to give him wet food and then revert back to
giving him dry food. They're like, I want the wet food.
That is how I feel now about Godzilla. I've seen
them in the best version and done at such a

(32:25):
cheap price, which now they are saying that it costs
even less than the reported fifteen million dollars to make
that movie. So it is just incredible to me still
that you can make a movie that looks like that
for so little money, which fifteen million dollars is still
a lot of money, but not when it comes to
making movies. And then I see a movie like this

(32:45):
which is easily gonna cost almost ten times that, because
cong versus Godzilla costs around one hundred and fifty five
million dollars to make, and by the looks of this trailer,
they probably uped it just a little bit because you
have so many more monsters running around fighting each other.
So what the premise is in this movie. It's now
Kong and Godzilla teaming up to fight this other big

(33:07):
Kong like creature who was more violent and just a
lot more hardcore than Kong. And what you have in
this trailer is something that I was not really expecting
to see because when these movies started out, this monster
verse back in twenty fourteen with Godzilla, they were a
lot more grounded and they were a lot more focused
on the human element and their connection with all the

(33:29):
monsters in those movies, So, whether it be the Godzilla
movies or even like Kong, because when you look back
on the twenty fourteen Godzilla, which really changed the landscape
of the Monster verse and how we receive these movies,
they were a lot more rooted in the human characters,
and with every movie they'd kind of gotten a little
bit more and more away from that. And I think
that's also what led me to love Godzilla vers just

(33:50):
Coung so much, because it was really just them two
being the main characters in those movies, and now here
in this trailer it almost looks like you don't need
the humans whatsoever, because there are so many monsters fighting
each other and Kong and god Zilla teaming up that
it almost feels like it's going the way of the
Fast and the Furious movies, where you just get right
to the action and you get to the ridiculousness of

(34:11):
all these sponsors just fighting. So this movie is coming
out next year. Before I get into more of my thoughts,
here's just a little bit of the trailer. This world
has more secrets than we could possibly imagine. What it's not,
that's not cong con can't stop this on his own.

(34:34):
He won't be alone. Is that a mini can Ah? Yes,
it looks like we're getting baby King Kong in this movie.
So you have some stars returning like Rebecca Hall and
Brian Tyree Henry, who I love. Doesn't look like Millie
Bobby Brown is coming back for this one, which I'm

(34:54):
really okay with. She can go back and maybe finish
Stranger Things so we can all get some closure there.
But even she's done with that series, so maybe she
doesn't like any of these movies whatsoever anymore. If I
hadn't have seen Minus one before seeing this trailer, I
probably would have been a lot more excited for this.
But I have to say my palette is just not
itching for a movie like this right now, even though

(35:14):
I'm currently rewatching all the Monster Verse movies. I just
finished King of Monsters and it's just not the same.
Like those movies are fun and entertaining, But to realize
that there could be a much more sophisticated version of Godzilla,
I'm like, oh man, they should really get some different
filmmakers here. But the thing that's troubling me about this
trailer is how ridiculous it looks, and whenever they come

(35:35):
out with like a baby King Kong, or if they
did a baby Godzilla, it just feels a little bit
cheesy to me. And like I said in my review,
I'm not the biggest King Kong fan. I'm much more
into Godzilla. I'm not the biggest fan of his look.
In this trailer. They chose to make them pink, which
maybe they're trying to level them up a little bit.
It's like you went Super Saiyan that references for all

(35:57):
my Dragon ball Z fans. So maybe they just wanted up,
you know, level them up a little bit and make
them look a little bit more hardcore. I just feel
like they revealed a little bit too much of the
mystery of this movie in this trailer, really trying to
sell us on the big visuals and all of the
fighting and all of the crazy locations that it looks
like they're going into. It just feels less and less

(36:17):
like a movie grounded in reality. I realizing I'm saying
this about a Monster Verse movie, but it looks like
it's just grounded a little bit, less and less in reality,
and more so just a bunch of animals kind of
fighting out in the middle of nowhere, but there is
one scene that did give me hype, and even with
saying all this, I'm gonna go watch this movie in
theaters and love it and take it for what it is.

(36:38):
But the scene of Godzilla and King Kong like running together,
and to think just how much those characters have evolved
from being you know, big and slow and they don't
really move that fast, especially Godzilla as he's ripping through cities,
to just fool out sprinting. That is what I look
for in a movie like this. I guess. The other
problem I had with a look at this trailer is

(37:00):
how much it reminded me of Transformers Rise of the Beasts.
It almost looks hand in hand identical. There's one scene
in particular where either it's Kong's hand or the villain
in this movie. It comes out from the ground and
it has like this mechanical look to it. I thought
I was watching a new cut of Transformers Rise of
the Beasts. So these movies feel so similar to me

(37:21):
that I think I'm gonna have the same kind of
experience going to watch them. Which Transformers Rise of the
Beast was a fun time at the movies this summer,
but it didn't really leave me like wanting more of that,
or it didn't really enrich my life in the way
that the early Transformers movies did. So I just kind
of feel like this one is getting away from having
any real story to it and instead just kind of

(37:42):
being WWE wrestling with Kong and Godzilla. So again, the
movie is called Godzilla and Kong the New Empire and
it's coming out in theaters next year on April twelfth,
twenty twenty four. And that is this week's edition of
movie Line Tram or Bar, and that is gonna do
it for another episode here of the podcast. Before I go,

(38:03):
I gotta get my listeners shout out of the week.
I encourage you if I made your top five most
listened to podcasts of the year, to tag me in
your Instagram story or send me a DM with a
screenshot making your top five. And this week I got
a shout out silas Pace, who I'm right there in
is top five most listened to podcasts of the year,
and he said I'd probably be higher if I put

(38:23):
out more episodes than a week, So maybe I can
work on that because there's a lot of spoiler episodes
that I would like to do really diving into some
details of some movies I've watched recently. So thank you
Silas for being a top listener this year. Thank you
listening right now being a part of the movie crew.
What does that mean? It just means you share your
love for the show on social media. Tag me and
your Instagram story at Mike Distro, comment on my TikTok

(38:46):
to get next week's listener shout out since we had
an interview this week, comment on my TikTok and Instagram
with the cop emoji. So many great movies coming out
this month, so it's a great time to be a
part of the podcast and share it with a friend
who you know shares your love for movies like we
all do on this podcast, so they can be a
part of the fun. Thank you, and until next time,
go out and watch good movies and I will talk

(39:07):
to you later.
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